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Carley

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

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US Citizen in Mexico, moving back to US with Mexican Husband

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Hello,<p>I am a US citizen currently living and working in Cancun, and recently got married to a Mexican man. My husband and I went to Merida a few weeks ago to get his tourist visa as we have a trip home planned for a couple weeks this fall. They only gave him a one entry temporary visa, since they said normally he wouldnt qualify since we don't have a house or a car here, and they advised us to apply for the resident visa. Since we were planning on moving back probably next year anyway, I will be starting the process of applying for his resident visa, with myself and my sister as the joint sponsor. I am just looking for anyone who has had experience dealing with this who might have any advice for us, as this whole process looks a little overwhelming.<p>Thanks, and feel free to email me at dahlca@yahoo.com



alex

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #2 of 5 (993 views)

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visas 'n stuff

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First check out the INS website and investigate the requirements for the "new" K-visa. One of the last things Clinton did before he left office was approving a new class of visa that allows a spouse and minor children to live in the US with the petitioner while the paperwork is in process. This may be important to you depending on when you plan to return to the US permanently. There will be tons of forms to fill out, many of them with the same information and you will be asked to submit the same forms on more than one occasion. You can do all this paperwork without the aid of an immigration attorney, just be very cognizant of the details. I used a form-filler-outer at www.formsassistant.com to manage the paperwork. What you do is enter all your information into a database, then call up a form and it fills it out for you, then print it out. It costs some money, but I say its a reasonable amount.
It is unlikely that your sister, as a co-sponsor, will have any influence on your ability to qualify as the petitioner.
Figure 18 months from start to finish, you mileage may vary.
Alex


Carley

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #3 of 5 (993 views)

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visas 'n stuff

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Thanks for the info Alex. I will check out the K visa stuff, since all I was aware of is the resident visa, which for us would be a conditional one since we have been married less than two years. The reason I say I will have my sister as a joint sponsor is because, according to the paperwork I got from the Consular office in Merida, the sponsor has to prove that they make 125% of the poverty level for the US. Although I make decent money for Cancun, it is not enough to meet that requirement, so we will need a joint sponsor that will say they will support him if something happens. You estimate 18 months, have you been through this process?
Thanks for any info
Carley<p><p>: First check out the INS website and investigate the requirements for the "new" K-visa. One of the last things Clinton did before he left office was approving a new class of visa that allows a spouse and minor children to live in the US with the petitioner while the paperwork is in process. This may be important to you depending on when you plan to return to the US permanently. There will be tons of forms to fill out, many of them with the same information and you will be asked to submit the same forms on more than one occasion. You can do all this paperwork without the aid of an immigration attorney, just be very cognizant of the details. I used a form-filler-outer at www.formsassistant.com to manage the paperwork. What you do is enter all your information into a database, then call up a form and it fills it out for you, then print it out. It costs some money, but I say its a reasonable amount.
: It is unlikely that your sister, as a co-sponsor, will have any influence on your ability to qualify as the petitioner.
: Figure 18 months from start to finish, you mileage may vary.
: Alex<p>


alex

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #4 of 5 (993 views)

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yep, I did it

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It took me nearly two years, but four months of that was spent collecting all the relevant documents, having them translated from Spanish to English by approved translator, notarized copies,etc. This was before filing the first piece of paper with INS. To immigrate my wife and daughter, using no attorney, cost about $2000 USD altogether including travel to Juarez, Chihuahua.
Alex


Carley

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #5 of 5 (993 views)

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Thanks

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Alex, <p>Thanks for responding to my messages. It's good to know I'm able to talk with some people who have been through this, since the whole process seems pretty overwhelming after reading the info on the ins.gov website. I am planning on starting this in late October, so I may be posting more questions then.
Thanks again.
Carley<p>
:
: It took me nearly two years, but four months of that was spent collecting all the relevant documents, having them translated from Spanish to English by approved translator, notarized copies,etc. This was before filing the first piece of paper with INS. To immigrate my wife and daughter, using no attorney, cost about $2000 USD altogether including travel to Juarez, Chihuahua.
: Alex<p>
 
 
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