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Craig

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

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Potential move to Lake Chapala area

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Hi -
Thanks in advance for any/all replies to this message. My wife and I are in our mid-30s and considering a move to the Lake Chapala area. I lived in Mexico City for most of 1995 on a job assignment. After living and traveling through a good portion of Mexico, I studied and learned quite a lot of Spanish - I would say I am 80% fluent. My wife has a Masters Degree in Art History - she studies in Italy for 2 years.<p>I mention all of this to say that we are familiar with living outside the U.S. (we currently live in Connecticut - but I'm originally from Texas). We have done well enough financially that we can pay cash for a nice home in the Lake Chapala area, BUT I would still want to find a decent paying job to continue to save for eventual retirement. So in a way, we'd be living in paradise, but I'd still need to work for normal living expenses and to save for retirement.<p>My question is this - how is the job market in the Lake Chapala area (including Guadalajara or other areas within a reasonable commute)? Are there jobs available for young professionals?<p>Thank you very much for any/all information!<p>Craig



Uncle Donnie

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #2 of 5 (3370 views)

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Potential move to Lake Chapala area

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As far as I know, many of the younger folks (under 55 or so)who are working have set up their own businesses in this area.<p>I know of some lawyers who are working as "legal assistants" or some like title for local lawyers.<p>A lot of folks have set up computer repair services, some work as photographers, there's a chef or two, a mechanic from Canada, and in the past there's been a doctor or two (may still be), financial consultants, but the overwhelming (well, almost overwhelming) number of working gringos seem to be in real estate sales or development, or the arts.<p>If you look on the jobs listing area of Mexconnect you'll see that most of the jobs offered are either technical or require quite a bit of experience, and most of them are somewhere other than here.<p>The Chapala/Ajijic area isn't really a hotbed of industry so Guad might be more realistic. I understand that a group of gringos have recently come up with an unpublicised idea to build an industrial park in the area so maybe by the time you get ready to move they'll have despoiled this area enough to provide a job or two.<p>Good luck.<p>UD<p><p><p><p><p><p><p>: Hi -
: Thanks in advance for any/all replies to this message. My wife and I are in our mid-30s and considering a move to the Lake Chapala area. I lived in Mexico City for most of 1995 on a job assignment. After living and traveling through a good portion of Mexico, I studied and learned quite a lot of Spanish - I would say I am 80% fluent. My wife has a Masters Degree in Art History - she studies in Italy for 2 years.<p>: I mention all of this to say that we are familiar with living outside the U.S. (we currently live in Connecticut - but I'm originally from Texas). We have done well enough financially that we can pay cash for a nice home in the Lake Chapala area, BUT I would still want to find a decent paying job to continue to save for eventual retirement. So in a way, we'd be living in paradise, but I'd still need to work for normal living expenses and to save for retirement.<p>: My question is this - how is the job market in the Lake Chapala area (including Guadalajara or other areas within a reasonable commute)? Are there jobs available for young professionals?<p>: Thank you very much for any/all information!<p>: Craig<p>


Craig

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #3 of 5 (3371 views)

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Potential move to Lake Chapala area

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Uncle Donnie - thank you for your feedback! I'll continue my research on the opportunities. Is it a reasonable commute from lake chapala area to Guadalajara? Say 45 minutes or less?<p>: As far as I know, many of the younger folks (under 55 or so)who are working have set up their own businesses in this area.<p>: I know of some lawyers who are working as "legal assistants" or some like title for local lawyers.<p>: A lot of folks have set up computer repair services, some work as photographers, there's a chef or two, a mechanic from Canada, and in the past there's been a doctor or two (may still be), financial consultants, but the overwhelming (well, almost overwhelming) number of working gringos seem to be in real estate sales or development, or the arts.<p>: If you look on the jobs listing area of Mexconnect you'll see that most of the jobs offered are either technical or require quite a bit of experience, and most of them are somewhere other than here.<p>: The Chapala/Ajijic area isn't really a hotbed of industry so Guad might be more realistic. I understand that a group of gringos have recently come up with an unpublicised idea to build an industrial park in the area so maybe by the time you get ready to move they'll have despoiled this area enough to provide a job or two.<p>: Good luck.<p>: UD<p><p><p><p>: : Hi -
: : Thanks in advance for any/all replies to this message. My wife and I are in our mid-30s and considering a move to the Lake Chapala area. I lived in Mexico City for most of 1995 on a job assignment. After living and traveling through a good portion of Mexico, I studied and learned quite a lot of Spanish - I would say I am 80% fluent. My wife has a Masters Degree in Art History - she studies in Italy for 2 years.<p>: : I mention all of this to say that we are familiar with living outside the U.S. (we currently live in Connecticut - but I'm originally from Texas). We have done well enough financially that we can pay cash for a nice home in the Lake Chapala area, BUT I would still want to find a decent paying job to continue to save for eventual retirement. So in a way, we'd be living in paradise, but I'd still need to work for normal living expenses and to save for retirement.<p>: : My question is this - how is the job market in the Lake Chapala area (including Guadalajara or other areas within a reasonable commute)? Are there jobs available for young professionals?<p>: : Thank you very much for any/all information!<p>: : Craig<p>


Uncle Donnie Don Adams

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #4 of 5 (3373 views)

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Potential move to Lake Chapala area

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Craig, the drive is usually about 35-40 minutes and traffic is usually not bad, although keep in mind that I never go during normal commuter times. Keep in mind that Guad is a huge city and once you hit the city streets (although there's an excellent series of roads that encircle the city)things slow down a bit.<p>Please don't take my advice and observations as anywhere near the entire story because i hope you'll hear fron some folks who actually work down here. I avoided that status as much as possible even before I retired.<p>There are a few U.S. based companies between here and Guad and last year I met some folks from CA who were down here working for one of them. I'm going in tomorrow and I'll try to remember to jot down a couple of names to help with your research.<p><p><p>
: Uncle Donnie - thank you for your feedback! I'll continue my research on the opportunities. Is it a reasonable commute from lake chapala area to Guadalajara? Say 45 minutes or less?<p>: : As far as I know, many of the younger folks (under 55 or so)who are working have set up their own businesses in this area.<p>: : I know of some lawyers who are working as "legal assistants" or some like title for local lawyers.<p>: : A lot of folks have set up computer repair services, some work as photographers, there's a chef or two, a mechanic from Canada, and in the past there's been a doctor or two (may still be), financial consultants, but the overwhelming (well, almost overwhelming) number of working gringos seem to be in real estate sales or development, or the arts.<p>: : If you look on the jobs listing area of Mexconnect you'll see that most of the jobs offered are either technical or require quite a bit of experience, and most of them are somewhere other than here.<p>: : The Chapala/Ajijic area isn't really a hotbed of industry so Guad might be more realistic. I understand that a group of gringos have recently come up with an unpublicised idea to build an industrial park in the area so maybe by the time you get ready to move they'll have despoiled this area enough to provide a job or two.<p>: : Good luck.<p>: : UD<p><p>
: : : Hi -
: : : Thanks in advance for any/all replies to this message. My wife and I are in our mid-30s and considering a move to the Lake Chapala area. I lived in Mexico City for most of 1995 on a job assignment. After living and traveling through a good portion of Mexico, I studied and learned quite a lot of Spanish - I would say I am 80% fluent. My wife has a Masters Degree in Art History - she studies in Italy for 2 years.<p>: : : I mention all of this to say that we are familiar with living outside the U.S. (we currently live in Connecticut - but I'm originally from Texas). We have done well enough financially that we can pay cash for a nice home in the Lake Chapala area, BUT I would still want to find a decent paying job to continue to save for eventual retirement. So in a way, we'd be living in paradise, but I'd still need to work for normal living expenses and to save for retirement.<p>: : : My question is this - how is the job market in the Lake Chapala area (including Guadalajara or other areas within a reasonable commute)? Are there jobs available for young professionals?<p>: : : Thank you very much for any/all information!<p>: : : Craig<p>


Craig

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #5 of 5 (3370 views)

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Potential move to Lake Chapala area

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Don, that's great news to hear there are U.S.-based companies nearby. Thank you very much for jotting down the names of the companies at your convenience. These companies will certainly be a great place to start. Safe travels tomorrow - I look forward to hearing back from you!<p>: Craig, the drive is usually about 35-40 minutes and traffic is usually not bad, although keep in mind that I never go during normal commuter times. Keep in mind that Guad is a huge city and once you hit the city streets (although there's an excellent series of roads that encircle the city)things slow down a bit.<p>: Please don't take my advice and observations as anywhere near the entire story because i hope you'll hear fron some folks who actually work down here. I avoided that status as much as possible even before I retired.<p>: There are a few U.S. based companies between here and Guad and last year I met some folks from CA who were down here working for one of them. I'm going in tomorrow and I'll try to remember to jot down a couple of names to help with your research.<p><p>:
: : Uncle Donnie - thank you for your feedback! I'll continue my research on the opportunities. Is it a reasonable commute from lake chapala area to Guadalajara? Say 45 minutes or less?<p>: : : As far as I know, many of the younger folks (under 55 or so)who are working have set up their own businesses in this area.<p>: : : I know of some lawyers who are working as "legal assistants" or some like title for local lawyers.<p>: : : A lot of folks have set up computer repair services, some work as photographers, there's a chef or two, a mechanic from Canada, and in the past there's been a doctor or two (may still be), financial consultants, but the overwhelming (well, almost overwhelming) number of working gringos seem to be in real estate sales or development, or the arts.<p>: : : If you look on the jobs listing area of Mexconnect you'll see that most of the jobs offered are either technical or require quite a bit of experience, and most of them are somewhere other than here.<p>: : : The Chapala/Ajijic area isn't really a hotbed of industry so Guad might be more realistic. I understand that a group of gringos have recently come up with an unpublicised idea to build an industrial park in the area so maybe by the time you get ready to move they'll have despoiled this area enough to provide a job or two.<p>: : : Good luck.<p>: : : UD<p>
:
: : : : Hi -
: : : : Thanks in advance for any/all replies to this message. My wife and I are in our mid-30s and considering a move to the Lake Chapala area. I lived in Mexico City for most of 1995 on a job assignment. After living and traveling through a good portion of Mexico, I studied and learned quite a lot of Spanish - I would say I am 80% fluent. My wife has a Masters Degree in Art History - she studies in Italy for 2 years.<p>: : : : I mention all of this to say that we are familiar with living outside the U.S. (we currently live in Connecticut - but I'm originally from Texas). We have done well enough financially that we can pay cash for a nice home in the Lake Chapala area, BUT I would still want to find a decent paying job to continue to save for eventual retirement. So in a way, we'd be living in paradise, but I'd still need to work for normal living expenses and to save for retirement.<p>: : : : My question is this - how is the job market in the Lake Chapala area (including Guadalajara or other areas within a reasonable commute)? Are there jobs available for young professionals?<p>: : : : Thank you very much for any/all information!<p>: : : : Craig<p>
 
 
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