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Michelle

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

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Mexicans getting a US visa...

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I am curious about what entails a Mexican to get a visa for the US. I know that they need to make an appointment at the US embassy, and there is an interivew involved. I am curious about what kinds of things they ask in the interview, what are they looking and asking for, what do you need to show that you will return, etc. Any and all information about this process is greatly appreciated- Thanks!



andrew

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

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Mexicans getting a US visa...

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All the formal requirements for showing that one will come back to Mexico are deliberately vague - otherwise, it would be all too easy to fake them. In the end, the consuls, essencially randomize, based on how "persuasive" the applicant is (in fact, there is a formal directive instructing them to pay more attention to impressions than to documents). I would say that it is important to be very clear and consistent on what is the reason for travel and what are the reasons that would ensure coming back to Mexico, never vacillate, still have all possible documents handy (just in case). You never know what can sway the consul - a friend of mine in South Asia got her visa by claiming that she was planning to inherit her father's seat in a legislature (don't try this one here, though!)! (tells you how stupid things can become, though - she never planned either to overstay her visa OR to go into politics, but the lie worked to persuade the consul of the truth). In case of a rejection - don't let it stand, it would complicate your life enormously, try appealing, anything. Sometimes it does work, more often than you might think. If both of you are actually planning to live in Mexico - and the fiance visa is not suitable, for some reason - then during the appeal (not before, this could be risky) you may, actually, bring up your own role in this and try to advertise your own ties to Mexico, assuming they are solid enough (did work for a friend - he had just bought an apartment in DF, so they, eventually, gave a tourist B visa to his fiance). <p>As for the border crossing: it is very unusual for someone to be denied entry with a valid B visa, though it can happen. More likely, there could be a short detention, while they clarify things (especially, if the person's name coincides with the name of someone who had been deported or is otherwise inadmissible, but also in other circumstances - I've been detained for about an hour and a half when the border guy didn't like the picture on my visa). Same things apply - be confident and clear on why you are traveling - usually, things go through fine even in this case and they would rebook you on another flight if you miss a connection. In case you feel deportation is imminent and unavoidable request "voluntary departure in lieu of deportation" - if they grant it, it is much better than having a deportation on your record. Just don't do it simply because you panic - this would be the high form of stupidity, and could be suspicious in itself. Everything in this last paragraph you, most likely, won't need.<p>


Rolly

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #3 of 6 (3123 views)

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Mexicans getting a US visa...

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The process is so subjective that it is almost impossible to foresee what will be asked or looked at. Nevertheless, I will venture where a wise man wouldn’t and give you some of the things I have learned from friends who have been through it.<p>The number one thing the interviewer wants to feel secure about is that the applicant is not going North to work or to stay, that there are strong ties to bring him/her back, and that there is no financial incentive for him/her to stay in the USA. Having a spouse and bunch of kids does not provide that assurance; in fact, family responsibility is the #1 reason for going North to work. Owning a car and a home are good points. But the two best ones seem to be several months of bank statements showing gobs of money on deposit and a letter from his/her employer stating that the employee has permission to take time off for this trip and that a job will be waiting when he/she returns. It seems that owning your own business is a good point if you can prove that it is profitable.<p>One friend told me he was told, as he was being refused, that he needed to have the equivalent of US$ 5,000 in the bank for at least three months. That is the only time I have heard an exact dollar amount given. I know others who were not asked for bank information at all. <p>An almost always asked question is Why do you want to go to the US? “To visit my husband” is not nearly as good an answer as “To go to Las Vegas on vacation.”<p>I hope this helps, but remember getting a visa to the USA is not the result of following specific rules, rather it is 100% the subjective feelings of the interviewer.<p>Good luck (you'll need it)


Tom in Nogales

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #4 of 6 (3124 views)

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Mexicans getting a US visa...

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I'm not an expert, but have helped my in-laws get their US visa. By help, I mean call up the number, set up the appointment, fill out thier forms and, then, driving them to the consulate. They get very nervous and anxious when having to deal with US authority. I was more of an emotional support, more than anything. Which helped them, because if they are nervous in front of the consular agent, this sets off red flags for the agent.<p>Mainly what consular agent is interested to know is if they are going back to Mexico, that is, not stay in the US. My mother-in-law was asked if my spouse had any kids to take care of. No kids, so no problems. Purpose of their visit, (visit, shopping). My father-in-law was asked about his job, his home. Have they paid their real-estate mexican taxes. How they felt about Mexico. They also mentioned that she had an ailing father and kids to take care of, but in Mexico. Don't know if this helped, but I'm sure it didn't hurt.<p>Great economic solvency is not really issue as they just want to see a stable and rooted life being lived in Mexico (my in-laws don't even have a mexican bank account), but they sufficed the consulate agent and were granted the visa. Wasn't that bad.<p>Then my sister-in-law went with her two young kids and husband, she had been granted a US visa when she was young but was expired, went and applied. At the interview, showed her IMSS health insurance cards, home title (they have an Infonavit home) and reciepts of paid real-estate taxes. Their car title and various current utility bills, and were also granted visa.<p>The problems come in when they don't have a stable or can't prove they have a stable life. Then, they get denied.<p>Hope this helps, but the main issue is long term stability, as far as I have seen.<p>Good luck.<p><p>: I am curious about what entails a Mexican to get a visa for the US. I know that they need to make an appointment at the US embassy, and there is an interivew involved. I am curious about what kinds of things they ask in the interview, what are they looking and asking for, what do you need to show that you will return, etc. Any and all information about this process is greatly appreciated- Thanks!<p>


Mereja

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #5 of 6 (3126 views)

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Mexicans getting a US visa...

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I pretty much did the same thing for my in-laws. I even hired a lawyer from here who sent faxes to them in Mexico. It didn't work. We also had a travel agency send a letter by fax saying that they had bought round-trip tickets to go to the US. They have a house and land, and 4 grown children and numerous grandchildren in Mexico. They are also in the middle to late 60's, so they are not going to work. <p>It just depends alot on the mood of the person that day and I have also heard that they give out a certain number of visa's and when they meet that number they deny everyone for a while. My husband will be becoming a US citizen, mostly so that his parents can come and visit. And they will be going home. When they went, there was a woman in front of them who obtained a visa because her daughter (who was illegal) was in the US in the hospital. She had nothing to prove anything, but cried alot and was given a visa. My brother in law (who is here legally) was run over by a dump truck and survived, and my in-laws applied to be able to come to see him (2nd application). They had the hospital fax to the consulate the information about him and they were still denied. I also know of a woman who's baby was born with a problem. Her parents started applying before the baby died, but didn't get the visa until after the baby died, but they did get the visa afterwards. Their daughter is also here illegally. I think it just depends on the mood of the person and who interviews you.
Mereja<p>: I'm not an expert, but have helped my in-laws get their US visa. By help, I mean call up the number, set up the appointment, fill out thier forms and, then, driving them to the consulate. They get very nervous and anxious when having to deal with US authority. I was more of an emotional support, more than anything. Which helped them, because if they are nervous in front of the consular agent, this sets off red flags for the agent.<p>: Mainly what consular agent is interested to know is if they are going back to Mexico, that is, not stay in the US. My mother-in-law was asked if my spouse had any kids to take care of. No kids, so no problems. Purpose of their visit, (visit, shopping). My father-in-law was asked about his job, his home. Have they paid their real-estate mexican taxes. How they felt about Mexico. They also mentioned that she had an ailing father and kids to take care of, but in Mexico. Don't know if this helped, but I'm sure it didn't hurt.<p>: Great economic solvency is not really issue as they just want to see a stable and rooted life being lived in Mexico (my in-laws don't even have a mexican bank account), but they sufficed the consulate agent and were granted the visa. Wasn't that bad.<p>: Then my sister-in-law went with her two young kids and husband, she had been granted a US visa when she was young but was expired, went and applied. At the interview, showed her IMSS health insurance cards, home title (they have an Infonavit home) and reciepts of paid real-estate taxes. Their car title and various current utility bills, and were also granted visa.<p>: The problems come in when they don't have a stable or can't prove they have a stable life. Then, they get denied.<p>: Hope this helps, but the main issue is long term stability, as far as I have seen.<p>: Good luck.<p>
: : I am curious about what entails a Mexican to get a visa for the US. I know that they need to make an appointment at the US embassy, and there is an interivew involved. I am curious about what kinds of things they ask in the interview, what are they looking and asking for, what do you need to show that you will return, etc. Any and all information about this process is greatly appreciated- Thanks!<p>


Maria

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #6 of 6 (3124 views)

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Mexicans getting a US visa...

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The Visa does not mean that you will be able to enter the US. Once you get to the USA you need to go through immigration at the airport, and a lot of questions will be asked, if the immigration employee does not like you or is in a bad mood you might be return back home. Remember that the agency of Immigration does noy usually follow the rules and laws written. They are given the freedom to decide who enters or not and they truly do so at their own discretion. So be careful at the airport.<p><p>
I'm not an expert, but have helped my in-laws get their US visa. By help, I mean call up the number, set up the appointment, fill out thier forms and, then, driving them to the consulate. They get very nervous and anxious when having to deal with US authority. I was more of an emotional support, more than anything. Which helped them, because if they are nervous in front of the consular agent, this sets off red flags for the agent.<p>: Mainly what consular agent is interested to know is if they are going back to Mexico, that is, not stay in the US. My mother-in-law was asked if my spouse had any kids to take care of. No kids, so no problems. Purpose of their visit, (visit, shopping). My father-in-law was asked about his job, his home. Have they paid their real-estate mexican taxes. How they felt about Mexico. They also mentioned that she had an ailing father and kids to take care of, but in Mexico. Don't know if this helped, but I'm sure it didn't hurt.<p>: Great economic solvency is not really issue as they just want to see a stable and rooted life being lived in Mexico (my in-laws don't even have a mexican bank account), but they sufficed the consulate agent and were granted the visa. Wasn't that bad.<p>: Then my sister-in-law went with her two young kids and husband, she had been granted a US visa when she was young but was expired, went and applied. At the interview, showed her IMSS health insurance cards, home title (they have an Infonavit home) and reciepts of paid real-estate taxes. Their car title and various current utility bills, and were also granted visa.<p>: The problems come in when they don't have a stable or can't prove they have a stable life. Then, they get denied.<p>: Hope this helps, but the main issue is long term stability, as far as I have seen.<p>: Good luck.<p>
: : I am curious about what entails a Mexican to get a visa for the US. I know that they need to make an appointment at the US embassy, and there is an interivew involved. I am curious about what kinds of things they ask in the interview, what are they looking and asking for, what do you need to show that you will return, etc. Any and all information about this process is greatly appreciated- Thanks!<p>
 
 
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