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Bothshallrow

Sep 6, 2017, 9:27 AM

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Attorney

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We are going to San Carlos for a one year probationary period, to see if it's a good fit for our relocation.
I have read that instead of trying to jump through all the hoops and paperwork to obtain the proper, legal papers (card) for residency (if we decide to stay) that hiring an attorney to assist is the quickest and best way.

Has anyone here had experience with this, and what are the usual and customary attorney fees etc.



joaquinx


Sep 6, 2017, 11:03 AM

Post #2 of 13 (589 views)

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Re: [Bothshallrow] Attorney

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We are going to San Carlos for a one year probationary period, to see if it's a good fit for our relocation.
I have read that instead of trying to jump through all the hoops and paperwork to obtain the proper, legal papers (card) for residency (if we decide to stay) that hiring an attorney to assist is the quickest and best way.

Has anyone here had experience with this, and what are the usual and customary attorney fees etc.


If you are going to enter Mexico as a tourist, the Tourist Permit (FMM) is good for only 180 days and can only be reissued at the border. To get a Residencia Temporal or Residencia Permanente, both processes are initiated outside of Mexico usually at a Mexican Consulate near you home in the US or other country.
_______
My desire to be well-informed is currently at odds with my desire to remain sane.


Bothshallrow

Sep 6, 2017, 11:40 AM

Post #3 of 13 (583 views)

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Re: [joaquinx] Attorney

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Thank you for the reply, it is appreciated. I have researched this topic and understand what you posted. I guess I am asking if a Mexican Attorney could save us some of the struggles, many have experienced by aassisting in the application steps and process. A Mexican Lawyer working with the Mexican counsulate (in the States) to help expedite the application might make it go smoothly (paperwork) and bridging the language barrier.
I have read that different cities could possibly impose various interpretations of qualifying factors (financial etc.) I read Boston and Chicago are very stringent and Las Vegas and Phoenix are a little more gentle.


joaquinx


Sep 6, 2017, 12:36 PM

Post #4 of 13 (576 views)

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Re: [Bothshallrow] Attorney

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I believe that you're making this too complicated. There is very little information that you need to present to the consulate. You need proof of income, usually in the form of six months of banks statements, passports, and birth certificates (?). Before you go off getting a lawyer who lives in Mexico to deal with a consulate in the US, go to the nearest consulate and ask them what they need. A face to face meeting is best as these consulates don't respond well to emails nor telephone calls.
_______
My desire to be well-informed is currently at odds with my desire to remain sane.


rvgringo

Sep 6, 2017, 1:36 PM

Post #5 of 13 (567 views)

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Re: [Bothshallrow] Attorney

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Thank you for the reply, it is appreciated. I have researched this topic and understand what you posted. I guess I am asking if a Mexican Attorney could save us some of the struggles, many have experienced by aassisting in the application steps and process. A Mexican Lawyer working with the Mexican counsulate (in the States) to help expedite the application might make it go smoothly (paperwork) and bridging the language barrier.
I have read that different cities could possibly impose various interpretations of qualifying factors (financial etc.) I read Boston and Chicago are very stringent and Las Vegas and Phoenix are a little more gentle.



RickS


Sep 6, 2017, 2:25 PM

Post #6 of 13 (561 views)

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Re: [Bothshallrow] Attorney

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NOTE: I wrote this earlier in the day but I guess it did not Post.....

If it were me, and I was going for a 1-year stay to see if it is 'a fit', I would NOT apply for a Residence card and all that process entails at this time, but would rather just go in with a 180-day Tourist card FMM. Yes, before the end of that 6-month period one will have to drive back to the border to cancel that one and get a new 180-day FMM but from San Carlos that is not a big problem... and maybe you would want to do some shopping anyway.

Also, if you do NOT plan on driving your vehicle any farther south than Guaymas, and therefore out of the "Sonora Only Free Zone", you would not even have to get a temporary vehicle import sticker, TIP.

If you do plan on driving past Guaymas you can get the TIP online... and for that matter the Tourist Card also, prior to leaving. They will be shipped to your US address in just a couple of days after you complete your application.

IF you still wish to go the Residency route, you really don't have to have an attorney. Tons of people do it alone. You could go to any US Mexican Consulate. They can/will give you the requirements. Once you go to the Consulate you will get preliminary paperwork for Residency. From that point you have 6 months to enter Mexico and once in Mexico 30-days to report to the nearest INM office to San Carlos.... 'probably' Guaymas but maybe Hermosillo. After that visit you will wait for some period of time... 4-8 weeks?.... before your Residente Temporal visa will be available for pickup at the INM office. During that period you may NOT leave Mexico unless you get an approval letter from INM.

Even with a Residente Temporal visa, one must have a TIP to venture south of Guaymas and out of the Senora Only Zone.


(This post was edited by RickS on Sep 6, 2017, 2:31 PM)


playaboy

Sep 7, 2017, 6:33 AM

Post #7 of 13 (533 views)

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Re: [Bothshallrow] Attorney

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Thank you for the reply, it is appreciated. I have researched this topic and understand what you posted. I guess I am asking if a Mexican Attorney could save us some of the struggles, many have experienced by aassisting in the application steps and process. A Mexican Lawyer working with the Mexican counsulate (in the States) to help expedite the application might make it go smoothly (paperwork) and bridging the language barrier.
I have read that different cities could possibly impose various interpretations of qualifying factors (financial etc.) I read Boston and Chicago are very stringent and Las Vegas and Phoenix are a little more gentle.


When I applied for my RP I used attorney Spencer McMullin. He guided me on the application process at the consulate and INM in Chapala. It was a quick and easy, I didn't go through any of the horror stories some of my friends have experienced that self-processed.

As Rick stated you are in the "no hassle zone". I have seen a Banjercito office in Empalme on hwy 15. You could process a TIP there if you want to go south. You might even be able to cancel one too.

Enjoy the shrimp.


Bothshallrow

Sep 7, 2017, 7:06 AM

Post #8 of 13 (529 views)

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Re: [playaboy] Attorney

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Mahalo nui Playboy, as I have read hundreds of message board posts from people who went it alone and had many difficulties. This process is so important and life changing (obviously) that legal assistance might be well worth the $$$. We don't even prepare our own tax returns anymore, and we pay those CPA fees every year. I believe paying for this assistance (one time) and making sure it's correct would be well worth the pesos.

We will make up the legal fees by cooking a few more meals at home.

Thanks for the reply......Bothshallrow


DavidHF

Sep 7, 2017, 7:24 AM

Post #9 of 13 (525 views)

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Re: [Bothshallrow] Attorney

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The process at a Consulate in the USA to get a Residente Temporal is simple and easy. The process at INM in Mexico to go from Temporal to Permanente is done in Spanish and can involve some bureaucratic BS which makes a facilitator (or Immigration attorney) often helpful.

Get your RT on your own. Then, should you decide to become permanent, hire a facilitator.


Bothshallrow

Sep 7, 2017, 7:48 AM

Post #10 of 13 (523 views)

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Re: [DavidHF] Attorney

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Mahalo, friend ******


joaquinx


Sep 7, 2017, 10:53 AM

Post #11 of 13 (511 views)

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Re: [Bothshallrow] Attorney

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Handing over documents, getting your picture taken, fingerprinting, etc. is not that difficult. Many have done this. Try it yourself before shelling out pesos for someone to direct you to a photographer and telling you to ink your fingertips.
_______
My desire to be well-informed is currently at odds with my desire to remain sane.


addtocart

Sep 8, 2017, 6:58 AM

Post #12 of 13 (478 views)

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Re: [Bothshallrow] Attorney

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Mahalo, friend ******

Are you in Hawaii? Here, the word is "gracias". Having said that, if you have money to burn get a Mexican lawyer. Maybe you'll get one who doesn't keep you on the string needing more information, etc. until your money runs out.


rvgringo

Sep 8, 2017, 8:06 AM

Post #13 of 13 (474 views)

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Re: [addtocart] Attorney

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Frankly; It would be foolish to engage a Mexican attorney to intercede with a Mexican consulate in the USA. Worse than foolish, maybe foolhardy. He will just fleece you & forget to tell you that he probably knows less about immigration than you do.

If you cannot deal with applying at a consulate yourself, you will never survive living in Mexico. Sure, there is a learning curve. It is wiser to learn by personal experience than to remain helpless. The helpless get fleeced.
 
 
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