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rlysens

Dec 20, 2015, 1:37 PM

Post #1 of 13 (8919 views)

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relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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Hi all,
Would it make sense to sell our brand new Subaru and buy an older used car (Honda Pilot) before we drive down to Sayulita, Nayarit?
A beat up Honda might be less of a target, gives us more space, is easier to maintain, and if things go really wrong we’d lose less value. Also, the Honda can be nationalized, although I doubt it's a good idea. The Subaru can not.

Maybe I’m just overthinking it and should just keep things simple: drive down in our own Subaru, and not worry too much about how well a new Subaru will fare in Mexico compared on and old Honda Pilot.
What do you guys think?
/Ruben.



rvgringo

Dec 20, 2015, 2:06 PM

Post #2 of 13 (8915 views)

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Re: [rlysens] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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Forget nationalizing. Consider that if you will reside in Mexico as a Residente Temporal, you will have your US car there for up to 4 years, before having to remove it from Mexico when you transition to Residente Permanente and can only drive Mexican vehicles. Other than that, only you can decide.


RickS


Dec 20, 2015, 7:16 PM

Post #3 of 13 (8880 views)

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Re: [rlysens] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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Short version: Keep the Subaru
Longer version: Less of a target for what? An older Pilot could easily be targeted equal to or more than a Suby. A new Subaru is not going to need any maintenance for a long time and you can't get much "less maintenance" than that. Subaru does have a presence in Mexico these days and anybody can 'change oil'.

You will take a beating selling a new car so soon. Why waste that money? As RV said, you'll probably have to remove any US car after 4 years. Sell it NOB then.

So, yes, keep it simple and don't overthink this any longer.


hunteradvisor


Dec 21, 2015, 4:48 AM

Post #4 of 13 (8843 views)

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Re: [rlysens] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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We did have a volunteer who drove down in her Subaru & it was a disaster.
In PV she went for an oil change where all of the taxi drivers go, they were not familiar (apparently) with her make and used the wrong filter or something. Long story minus details, she was delayed driving back north for 5 months waiting for the part she needed and had no car to use. A friend finally brought it down. Not only expensive the mechanic took no responsibility for it.
Keep in mind not all Hondas can be nationalized either, check the vin first. We had to take ours out.
Good luck!
Isabel
www.RanchoSolyMar.com


Gringal

Dec 21, 2015, 7:11 AM

Post #5 of 13 (8817 views)

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Re: [hunteradvisor] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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I's sell the Subaru, and it's painful to suggest that since I'm a real Subaru fan after owning three of them in the U.S.
Great cars.

However, anyone can work on a Honda, and they're all over the place in Mexico. You will want parts to be readily available.
As someone else mentioned, four years from now you'll need to have a Mexican plated car and you'd probably take a bigger bath on the Subaru at that time than selling it now while you're still in the States.

Good luck and welcome to Mexico!


AlanMexicali


Dec 21, 2015, 7:31 AM

Post #6 of 13 (8814 views)

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Re: [Gringal] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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In Reply To
I's sell the Subaru, and it's painful to suggest that since I'm a real Subaru fan after owning three of them in the U.S.
Great cars.

However, anyone can work on a Honda, and they're all over the place in Mexico. You will want parts to be readily available.
As someone else mentioned, four years from now you'll need to have a Mexican plated car and you'd probably take a bigger bath on the Subaru at that time than selling it now while you're still in the States.

Good luck and welcome to Mexico!



In the city of San Luis Potosi I have seen 2 large Subaru dealerships and new ones and older ones all over the place. No big deal to have a new Subaru here, even a new Mercedes or BMW, they are all over the place.

In Guadalajara and el DF even more new expensive luxury vehicles are a common sight. I certaintly wouldn´t worry about being a target because of US plates and a new Subaru in Mexico.


RickS


Dec 21, 2015, 9:09 AM

Post #7 of 13 (8793 views)

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Re: [AlanMexicali] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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I'm sure we can all give an anecdotal story of one car or another.... I have a friend who has a Subaru in Mexico and has never had a lick of problems.... but I stick to my recommedation of keeping the NEW Subaru. I had another friend with a Lexus Hybrid for years and never had any problem even with that. As Alan suggests, there are Subaru dealers in Mexico these days so even if one doesn't have quick access where they live, parts are available. I personally would rather have a newer car with 'statistically' no problems to fix than an older car that probably is going to have something to fix.

But, at the end of the day it is going to be what the OP is comfortable doing that counts. He/she has certainly gotten diametrically opposing answers here. But that's why one asks!


Mexicanbill

Dec 21, 2015, 1:07 PM

Post #8 of 13 (8756 views)

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Re: [rlysens] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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We have driven a Suburban to Puerto Vallarta twice and were unhappy on many different levels. One the last trip north we sold it and drove back in our Subaru. We love it, as it is small enough to park anywhere, can turn on a dime and is easy on the gas. As for repairs, There are two major shops in downtown PV where we get our oil changed without any problem. We have also had a tire repaired there after picking up a broke screw on the road after a rain shower.
If you need parts, there are as close as Guadalajara and take a couple of days shipping or you can go to the Subaru dealership there and have the work done, however that also could take a couple of days.
If you love your Subaru, as most of us that have one do, then that might be your best option..you want something you can enjoy.
Chef William aka MexicanBill


chicois8

Dec 22, 2015, 1:06 PM

Post #9 of 13 (8669 views)

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Re: [Mexicanbill] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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I am in Guayabitos with my 2015 Outback and loving it, with out the 10% crap in the US gas I am getting 38 MPG although I wish Pemex had USA gas pricing,LOL
There is a dealer in Guadalajara where parts are available, even oil filters and FEDEX could have overnighted a filter in a day...And with the US Government giving the Subaru a superior rating for safety and the almost 9" ground clearance I have no tope fears....
Rincon de Guayabitos,Nayarit
San Mateo, California


RickS


Dec 23, 2015, 9:20 AM

Post #10 of 13 (8616 views)

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Re: [chicois8] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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.... or just bring down a couple of air and oil filters when you come and you'll be set for several years.


Mexicanbill

Dec 23, 2015, 4:37 PM

Post #11 of 13 (8589 views)

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Re: [RickS] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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We even remove and vacuum the air filter every 6 weeks or so and it is doing just fine. With all the dust, that might be something to consider for a little longer life of the filter.
Chef William aka MexicanBill


YucaLandia


Dec 24, 2015, 10:45 AM

Post #12 of 13 (8526 views)

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Re: [rlysens] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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As a part-time mechanic both here (SOB) and NOB, I'd give a different set of answers.

Either: Pick the vehicle you really like, and go with that emotionally-satisfying choice, because if things go less-than-ideally, you're only responsible for yourself.

or
Our personal best advice is to decide, ahead of time: Do you intend to keep the vehicle in Mexico, full-time, for a long time?

If so, buy a vehicle here ... and short-circuit a whole bunch of import problems, Temporary Import Permit (TIP) problems, parts problems, repair problems, etc.

Say you cheerily drive the Subaru for a year or 3, and then some fool in the far right lane suddenly turns left - diagonally cutting across center & left lanes, and hits you (as you have zero control over what others do).

If you are lucky enough to have a Subaru dealership nearby, then you wait weeks for parts, and get your car back in a month or 2.

If you're unlucky, and you get walloped out in the boonies, expect to wait a few days, enjoying "adventures" in some rural Mexican isolated Timbuktu ... with smiling Zapatistas sharpening their machetes ... or maybe even sitting in some Narco-terror-war-zone ... waiting to find & get an expensive tow back to the USA or waiting to get towed over to some far-off dealership,

Is this a likely scenario? Nope...

If you make choices based on "likely scenarios", then also skip buying car insurance, because the most likely scenarios are: "You will NOT likely have an accident, so why bother with insurance?"

Do you buy car insurance, when the law does not require it?
Do you buy the bare-minimum of car insurance coverages?

.
Note that none of the extra-difficulties of having an exotic foreign car happens if you buy some reliable, common brand of car in Mexico, to keep and then use it for years in Mexico.

=========================

Alternate Scenario:
You buy a Nissan or a Ford in the USA, choosing a model that's very-common in Mexico, expecting that "Sure, they'll have parts and service all across Mexico."

Reality: Almost all Mexican Nissan models and almost all Mexican Ford models are somewhat different than their NOB versions. ... Different serpentine belts & pulleys (6 grooves vs 5 grooves) ,,, different starters- as the US Ford uses a Motorcraft starter, while the Mexican version uses an exotic Prestolyte starter ... because your Mexican Ford bell housing comes from Argentina.

Same issues happen with Mexican Ford & Mexican Nissan alternators, brake calipers, etc, as the Mexican versions often use different parts suppliers than the US and Canadian Ford factories. ... as even the clutch-release bearing arms can be different.

I've only worked on 6 different US Fords, and 8 different US Nissans - to personally have to deal with these specific starter, alternator, brake-caliper, T/O bearing replacement, serpentine belts etc. issues, but I suspect my experiences are not unique.

Alternately, all these issues vaporize like the morning-dew if you buy a Mexican vehicle.

Merry Christmas,
steve
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com


rlysens

Dec 24, 2015, 11:13 AM

Post #13 of 13 (8518 views)

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Re: [all] relocating to Sayulita, in a new Subaru or an old Honda

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OP here. Very interesting and diverse responses. I'm glad I asked.
We decided to hang on to the Subaru. We'll stick to a TIP for a while. Once we're reasonably confident that we can make things work in Mexico, we'll sell it NOB and buy a proper Mexican car.
Thanks for all the responses and Feliz Navidad!

Ruben.
 
 
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