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playaboy

Feb 26, 2015, 12:25 PM

Post #1 of 55 (12134 views)

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US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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If you don’t like what you are about to read, don’t shoot me I am just the messenger. Below is contact information for you to direct your questions.
With all the discussions on web boards about car importing, brokers, facilitators, bad paperwork, and outright rip-offs, I tried to get to the real “legal” bottom of this mess. I think I have had some success in getting information. Six months ago I started discussions with executives at the Dept of Commerce, Homeland Security, CBP and Mexico Desk Officer, International Trade Administration.
This is about USA laws and regulations, not Mexico’s. I focused on the “export” issue. The following are email discussions getting to the point.
This was my initial official request for an “Advisory Opinion”.
.

Issue

Do all vehicles imported into Mexico have to be formally exported from the USA? Are there exceptions to the law posted at the CBP web page; http://www.cbp.gov/trade/basic-import-export/export-docs/motor-vehicle

Background

There are approximately one million Americans living in Mexico. These expats residents of Mexico have to learn to abide by a completely new set of laws, regulations and customs in their new home. As Americans, we still are subject to USA laws too.

Mexico requires foreigners to obtain permits to drive their foreign plated vehicles in the country. These permits are usually issued for a period up to six months. Because of a loophole in the Mexican customs laws, certain residency visas available in the past to Americans allowed them to keep their US plated car in Mexico beyond the expiration date on the permit. Many expats were able to drive their cars with expired USA plates for years.

In 2013, Mexico implemented a massive overhaul of their Immigration laws. Because of these changes, many American residents of Mexico lost the loophole allowing them to drive their cars. They were to remove the vehicles from Mexico or if eligible to import/nationalize the vehicles. Many of expat residents were caught off guard by these changes. People were not sure what to do.
Facilitators, seeing an opportunity, have appeared out of the woodwork offering all kinds of solutions. "100's of US-plated cars - previously taken into Mexico on a supposedly temporary basis, are being converted into a Permanently Imported Mexican vehicles via a “paper-only” process without ever going back to the USA border for formal export. Other solutions have lead to many expats being ripped off for substantial amounts of money.




Question

When does one have to comply with CFR 192? What are the consequences of not complying? If someone has imported their car into Mexico and has not exported the car from the USA, can they come forward and retroactively comply?


This is the response from executives at CBP in DC.


In many cases, it sounds like these individuals should have formally exported the vehicles from the U.S. (i.e., they did not submit Electronic Export Information (EEI) via the Automated Export System (AES) (unless exempt i.e. valued under $2500) and did not present the title/ownership documentation to CBP prior to export). Some of these vehicles have been in Mexico for years, but a loophole in Mexican law allowed the expats to drive the vehicles without being registered there. Due to recent changes in Mexican law, the vehicles must now be registered in Mexico. An individual residing in Mexico temporarily, such as on a work or student visa should contact the Mexican Embassy or the appropriate Mexican authorities to obtain their import and/or vehicle registration requirements.

After further discussing this with our attorneys, we have the following responses to the questions---

1) When is a vehicle exported?
Pursuant to CBP regulations 19 CFR 192.2, the vehicle and required documentation must be presented whenever a person “attempt to export a used self-propelled vehicle.” “Export” is defined in 19 CFR 192.1 for Part 192 purposes as “the transportation of merchandise out of the U.S. for the purpose of being entered into the commerce of a foreign country.” We generally do not consider Part 192 to apply when someone drives their vehicle foreign for a short period of time and returns to the U.S. It appears that some of the vehicles in question were “previously taken into Mexico on a temporary basis.” However, it also appears that many expats were able to drive their cars with expired U.S. plates for years. If a vehicle is driven in Mexico for years, then we would not consider that to be temporary (unless subject to a work or student visa) in nature and, therefore, we would consider that to be an export under Part 192. Regarding the Foreign Trade Regulations (FTR) (requires the EEI filing via the AES), goods are considered exported when they are sent or transported out of a country. See 15 CFR 30.1. However, temporary exports are generally exempted from filing EEI if they are exported from and returned to the United States in less than one year (12 months) from the date of export. See 15 CFR 30.37(q).

2) Can U.S. expats who legally imported vehicles into Mexico in the past come forward now to fulfill the export requirements (submit EEI and present the title or other ownership documentation)? Individuals may choose to contact the closest port of export to inquire about explaining their situation and processing the vehicle for export. However, penalties may apply depending on the circumstances. The violations occurred when the exporter failed to comply with Part 192 and/or failed to submit the EEI if it was NOT deemed a temporary export. The regulations in Part 192 provide for a $500 penalty against an exporter who has exported a vehicle without complying with the regulations. Under the mitigation guidelines, this penalty may be mitigated to between $50 and $250 for personal exportations. For FTR violations, things are a bit trickier. Under the FTR, a $10,000 penalty can be assessed for failure to file EEI. Under the mitigation guidelines, these penalties can be mitigated to between $750 and $2,500.

When the individuals contact the port to inquire about processing the vehicle for export, they may use my name or Tammy Golden as a reference if there are any questions raised about penalties and so forth. Every situation may vary so we can’t use one answer to fit all situations. We can review the circumstances of the case and assist the field with facilitating the decision if there are problems.

Let me know if this helps or if you have further questions.

Carla D’Onofrio, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Program Manager, 202-344-1196

Tammy Golden, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Program Manager, 202-344-3804



To quote from Tammy “CBP regulations are CBP regulations and need to be followed. The 12 month period Carla mentioned is under Census regulations and it is CBP’s responsibility to enforce Census regulations among others too”. The CBP agency expects all (including personal cars for personal use) used vehicles that are out of the USA for a period of more than 12 months to be presented to a “port of export” (Border) for processing a formal export.

This is the official USA CBP position. If you have any questions contact the people above.

This does not have anything to do with Mexico importing laws and regulations.

Attached are a Dept of Census Export Flyer and an official CBP export FAQ that has been posted before.


(This post was edited by playaboy on Feb 26, 2015, 3:49 PM)
Attachments: Flyer Exporting Vehicles to Mexico.pdf (140 KB)



NEOhio1


Feb 26, 2015, 3:24 PM

Post #2 of 55 (12093 views)

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Re: [playaboy] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Well then that is rather definitive. If you want to keep your US-plated vehicle, the only course of action is to be a Temporado and return to the border once a year so you don't mess with the 12 month return clause.

It costs more in fees and travel, but you have the car you want. Cost benefit analysis results will vary.


DigYourself

Feb 27, 2015, 2:10 PM

Post #3 of 55 (12011 views)

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Re: [playaboy] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Well let me ask you this - If we were to cross the border in Texas tomorrow, permanent residency visas in hand, would someone on the US side tell us we need to export our vehicle ?

In addition - the PDF you provided states that rules changed in like March 2013.


chinagringo


Feb 27, 2015, 2:16 PM

Post #4 of 55 (12008 views)

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Re: [cuerna1] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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I would think the following statement from above answers your question:

"The CBP agency expects all (including personal cars for personal use) used vehicles that are out of the USA for a period of more than 12 months to be presented to a “port of export” (Border) for processing a formal export."
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



playaboy

Feb 27, 2015, 3:06 PM

Post #5 of 55 (12003 views)

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Re: [cuerna1] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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In Reply To
Well let me ask you this - If we were to cross the border in Texas tomorrow, permanent residency visas in hand, would someone on the US side tell us we need to export our vehicle ?

In addition - the PDF you provided states that rules changed in like March 2013.


Don't ask me, I am no expert. Try asking the CBP ladies listed in my post above. There are direct contacts with phone numbers you can call. After you speak with them, let us know what they say.


DigYourself

Feb 27, 2015, 3:12 PM

Post #6 of 55 (12002 views)

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Re: [playaboy] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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So - a US citizen leaving the US with a permanent resident 'visa' is NOT told at the border that they need to export their vehicle ? What if you were heading to the tip of Chile ?


playaboy

Feb 27, 2015, 3:31 PM

Post #7 of 55 (11992 views)

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Re: [cuerna1] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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In Reply To
So - a US citizen leaving the US with a permanent resident 'visa' is NOT told at the border that they need to export their vehicle ? What if you were heading to the tip of Chile ?


I suggested you call CBP., either Tammy or Carla. Ask them what you are required to do at the border when moving out of the USA

Then post what they tell you.

There are a GIZILLION laws and regulations in the USA. It is your obligation to find out how the law pertains to your situation. The cops are not their to warn you, they are there to bust you. Then as an American you can have your day in court. Ignorance of the law has never been a defense...


chinagringo


Feb 27, 2015, 3:40 PM

Post #8 of 55 (11992 views)

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Re: [cuerna1] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Again from the previous quote, it doesn't appear that the US cares so much about where you are taking the vehicle but rather how long the vehicle will be out of the Country. If you are asking: "why wouldn't they tell you?" I would say this falls into your area of responsibility to know the rules & regs. They don't make you take a class on what you can bring back when you re-enter the US since this too would be your responsibility to do the research.
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



DigYourself

Feb 27, 2015, 3:50 PM

Post #9 of 55 (11983 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Sorry- Let's hear from those expats who get 'bit' by these 'new' regs (and their entire stories).


chinagringo


Feb 27, 2015, 4:31 PM

Post #10 of 55 (11961 views)

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Re: [cuerna1] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Well, please excuse me?

It just so happens that we broke the current rules & regs when we had an Oregon plated vehicle at our Mexico house for 7 years. How would people's stories of being bit or the fact that they were not compliant change the fact that these are the regs currently in effect? Does the fact that people may have been doing things wrong and getting away with it become an excuse for being ignorant of the law?
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



rvgringo

Feb 28, 2015, 9:40 AM

Post #11 of 55 (11902 views)

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Re: [cuerna1] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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In Reply To
So - a US citizen leaving the US with a permanent resident 'visa' is NOT told at the border that they need to export their vehicle ? What if you were heading to the tip of Chile ?

No, neither CBP nor Mexican authorities will tell you much of anything until it is too late.
If you hold a Mexican Residente Permanente Visa, you are not allowed to have a foreign plated car in Mexico, anyway.



(This post was edited by rvgringo on Feb 28, 2015, 9:44 AM)


YucaLandia


Feb 28, 2015, 10:02 AM

Post #12 of 55 (11895 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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In Reply To
Well, please excuse me?

It just so happens that we broke the current rules & regs when we had an Oregon plated vehicle at our Mexico house for 7 years. How would people's stories of being bit or the fact that they were not compliant change the fact that these are the regs currently in effect? Does the fact that people may have been doing things wrong and getting away with it become an excuse for being ignorant of the law?


Good questions that likely have no clear answers.

Remembering the context: These US vehicle export rules have been on the books for roughly 20 years. Homeland Security/CBP/Census Bureau updated them in 2013 to remove the $2,500 valuation exemption, and have the rules apply to all US-plated vehicles.

As of April, 2014, Homeland Security/Customs & Border Patrol had no idea that Americans were taking their cars into Mexico, without using a licensed customs broker, and leaving them outside the USA for years.

Homeland Security/CBP imagined that because they were doing some exports of US-titled cars (the cars being handled by customs brokers), they imagined that all US-titled cars were being appropriately exported. When CBP supervisors and managers heard about the big gap in their enforcement nets in April, 2014, they started a chain of actions and events that led to the joint efforts and joint Oct. 2014 requirements with the Mexican Govt. to start requiring that all US-titled vehicles being imported into Mexico, be first required to go through Homeland Security's/CBP's export and have the US title stamped as cancelled.

Under these historical twists and turns, CBP was not previously enforcing the law - as Neil found with his US vehicle left in Mexico for 7 years.

Now that the Mexican Gob. has fully-functioning computer databases at INM & Aduana - that track our movements/dates and track our Mexican addresses etc, and now that the Mex. Gob. is electronically sharing that information with Homeland Security/CBP for the first time ... Can any of us predict how these things will play out, especially concerning US vehicles that have been outside the USA for more 12 months?

We'll have to wait & see what stories are reported from Americans bringing their old US-titled vehicles back into the USA.
So far, we've seen no reports of either govt. enforcing these US vehicle export rules on US cars returning to the USA.

Happy Trails,
steve
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com


playaboy

Feb 28, 2015, 10:05 AM

Post #13 of 55 (11893 views)

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Re: [cuerna1] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Sorry- Let's hear from those expats who get 'bit' by these 'new' regs (and their entire stories).

These are old regulations. Maybe you can be the one to get caught and tell us your story.


DigYourself

Feb 28, 2015, 11:43 AM

Post #14 of 55 (11879 views)

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Re: [playaboy] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Seems this has been your mantra for nearly 2 years now. In that time I can't recall a single instance, on any forum, where someone with a properly nationalized vehicle has run into trouble for not having exported on the US side.

As best I remember it was Robert65 who first brought this item into focus. He routinely traveled across the Mexican-Texas border. That was in 2013.

I'm afraid I can't recall the crossing process (on the US side) when we crossed. If anyone had asked - 'what are your intentions ? how long will you be in Mexico ?' - we would have answered - forever. Perhaps we were asked. No one said please export your vehicle.

I can come up with a couple reasons for tracking vehicles leaving the US :
- revenue
- capturing stolen vehicles - or those involved in crime.

Our 15 year old vehicle - which is our baby - was today valued at less than $30k MXN at the dealership we are considering for the purchase of a new one.


(This post was edited by cuerna1 on Feb 28, 2015, 11:55 AM)


robt65

Feb 28, 2015, 1:54 PM

Post #15 of 55 (11857 views)

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Re: [cuerna1] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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. . . . . .yep, still making those trips every the months or so for my VA care, still crossing in the Reynosa area and still have never been approached by any federal CBP person as I entered Mexico. Maybe Mexico that you use has such a CBP person upon leaving the USA but personally I have never been approached by one, except one time in Laredo to assist in lane changes on Christmas day to facilitate traffic.
It still puzzles me as to why so many ex pats appear to think it is the responsibility of the USA Federal Government to hold our hands and explain every single detail about entering a new country for the rest of your life when the USA has absolutely nothing to do with and not responsible for another country's import export laws, immigration laws or taxation laws.?
Why jump all over Playaboy when all he has done is to provide folks with a solid (CBP head office phone number and name(s)) to get the correct information? Heck, pick up the phone and make a call. What are you going to do if you do get stopped and fined when you try to re-enter? Call playaboy? So give it a try. . . . . . . and please let us know. If you are still not sure as you get to the window, let the guy know about your time in México without legally exporting your car, he might just remind you about those flashing lights you saw a moment ago (photographing your cars plates) and redirect you to a secondary point for checking your cars papers. So give the name and numbers provided a call. Heck, it will take less time and trouble than all the time you have spent here honking on Playaboy about the subject and you will have the gospel answer for sure. Then you can head NOB with a clear conscience and breeze along through, . . . . . . . . . or maybe not. You might just want to keep a few, no more than a few extra bucks in your pocket . . . . . . just in case. I don't know if the CBP takes debit / credit cards or not.
I expect to return again NOB in a few more weeks. I will make a pointed effort to ask the agent I roll up to about your questions. In fact if you wish I will print out a copy of your questions to playaboy and ask him / her for a definitive answer and let you know their answer . . . . .. .if you wish? By the way . . .should I get his or her name for you?
Regards,
Robt65


playaboy

Mar 2, 2015, 6:14 AM

Post #16 of 55 (11750 views)

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Re: [cuerna1] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Robt65's thread on his experience in nationalizing his wife's car is the most complete essay written on any web board. Everybody should read it again. http://www.mexconnect.com/..._latest_reply;so=ASC

The best reason to follow normal processes and nationalize your vehicle at the border is to avoid fraud. If you use a broker that exports/imports your car, at the border, you have a 99.98% chance of having all the correct papers. The hundreds (maybe thousands) of people that were defrauded and got bad paperwork, used facilitators with "other methods" to nationalize.

Cuera1, it never really has been about "exporting"! It was never about the $500 fine if CBP caught you! It is about avoiding getting ripped off by facilitators. What are the virtual importing facilitators doing now? They are telling their pigeons to wait for the next amaparo or change in the SAT regulations. Some are still collecting money and handing out bad paperwork.

This whole vehicle situation has been a hardship for a lot of expats. It really gets compounded when you get robbed of a large sum of money trying to comply with the changing laws. Then you have to pay again to comply with the law.

This whole discussion is mute since Mexico now requires USA export paperwork before they will process importing a car. http://www.sat.gob.mx/...Paginas/opcion09.htm


RickS


Mar 2, 2015, 7:10 AM

Post #17 of 55 (11734 views)

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Re: [playaboy] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Unfortunately I do not read Spanish well enough, and I can find that particular webpage at all when I go to their English version.

Can you point me to an English version of this page? (Google cannot translate because it is not text but rather a 'picture')

Gracias


DigYourself

Mar 2, 2015, 7:13 AM

Post #18 of 55 (11733 views)

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Re: [playaboy] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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... and I wasn't 'jumping all over you'.

We did a lot of research when we nationalized our car - which was at a time when no one anywhere had mentioned the need to export on the US side. We called Aduana at that time, said we wanted to nationalize, lived no where near the US border and they gave us the name of a very large group - with offices in several cities in the US and Mexico. They handle a lot of things other than cars. We did not return to the border but were required to visit Aduana DF for inspection, pictures etc.It was a long drawn out process, particularly getting the plates in our home state. They scrutinized our pedimento at SAT. We met with them. The broker got involved. Everyone blessed the pedimento, we got our plates. When the whole thing was behind us I said - gosh it is a shame we couldn't take care of all that at the border when we first came across. That just wasn't happening.

I'm not looking for trouble, quite the contrary. It makes sense that the US border patrol study every vehicle leaving the US for theft, crime etc. Ok so there was a law apparently on the books for years which was not enforced. There are probably many, most of which I'm sure are quite arcane.

Our car will never see the US again. At 15 years old we wouldn't want to risk breaking down along the way (of the car or us). If the US is interested in tracking ALL cars that have EVER left the US permanently then perhaps they should do it through the embassy. When you go to renew your passport complete a questionnaire or something. Or work out something with Aduana where the expat visits an office closer than the US border.

Just my 2 cents.


playaboy

Mar 2, 2015, 7:43 AM

Post #19 of 55 (11724 views)

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Re: [RickS] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Rick, here is Intercasa's translation. http://www.chapalalaw.com/...pdate-december-2014/


cbviajero

Mar 2, 2015, 8:24 AM

Post #20 of 55 (11712 views)

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Re: [playaboy] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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In Reply To
Robt65's thread on his experience in nationalizing his wife's car is the most complete essay written on any web board. Everybody should read it again.

Unfortunately it's outdated,according to recent posts only 2006/2007 are eligible for nationalization,mine is a 2005...


playaboy

Mar 2, 2015, 1:01 PM

Post #21 of 55 (11671 views)

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Re: [cbviajero] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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The process outlined is not outdated. It is basically the same today as 2 years ago. It is only the model years allowed and the emission cert requirement that is different.


playaboy

Mar 16, 2015, 6:36 PM

Post #22 of 55 (11487 views)

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Re: [playaboy] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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Beside the names and phone numbers I posted earlier (here they are again.Carla D’Onofrio, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Program Manager, 202-344-1196, Tammy Golden, U.S. Customs and Border Protection Program Manager, 202-344-3804) I wanted to add an email address.

CBP has just created this brand new email address for all expats questions pertaining to their USA export requirements. So if you have any questions about the export/import process or want to know your USA legal obligations you can get the straight answers here.

cbpvehicleexports@cbp.dhs.gov


Moisheh

Mar 27, 2015, 4:40 PM

Post #23 of 55 (11279 views)

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Re: [playaboy] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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That rule came into effect when NAFTA became law. Canadians that export cars to Canada have been following that rule. Canada will not allow you to import the car until the title is canceled. I would imagine that Mexico was also supposed to follow that rule. There is a new glitch in the export process. You need to have some sort of Customs #. A US citizen can apply for this but Canadians just use a broker. US customs take all these things very seriously and the fines are huge. It is part of the electronic data transfer BS for exports and imports. Just ask a trucker who arrives at he USA border without the proper papers!


YucaLandia


Mar 28, 2015, 8:54 AM

Post #24 of 55 (11207 views)

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Re: [cbviajero] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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In Reply To

In Reply To
Robt65's thread on his experience in nationalizing his wife's car is the most complete essay written on any web board. Everybody should read it again.

Unfortunately it's outdated,according to recent posts only 2006/2007 are eligible for nationalization,mine is a 2005...


People who want to import foreign cars into Mexico should not be restricted by some limited posts with incorrect/incomplete information or "rules" that don't necessarily fit either NAFTA rules nor what's done at the border.

Consider reading this short article NAFTA Agreement Effects on Importing US/Canadian Used Cars into Mexico :

Note that the past 6 years of NAFTA law/treaty clearly prohibits Mexico from enforcing their "8-9 year old vehicle" policy on qualifying US and Canadian NAFTA vehicles. ~ The current NAFTA required rule since Jan.1, 2015 is that "used vehicles that are at least four years old" from NAFTA countries must be allowed for import into Mexico. ~

There has been a discontinuity between generic SAT/Aduana website-information on vehicle imports (covering all vehicle imports) versus NAFTA-based reality since 2009. The sea-port Aduana offices have followed the SAT/Aduana website published rule of allowing just 8-9 year old vehicles, along with enforcing emissions rules.

Rules for driving into Mexico and importing vehicles have been completely different, instead following NAFTA rules, allowing 10 year old NAFTA vehicles in 2009 (per NAFTA) and then allowing 6 year old and older vehicles starting in 2013.

For the past 6 years, NAFTA rules are very clear and easy-to-understand - and Mexico Aduana's vehicle import rules for driving into Mexico have precisely followed NAFTA rules - making the SAT/Aduana website's rules fit only sea-port imports:

=======================================
"North American Free Trade Agreement Annex 300-A

Trade and Investment in the Automotive Sector
Appendix 300-A.2: Mexico
Auto Decree and Auto Decree Implementing Regulations
Used Vehicles
24. Mexico may adopt or maintain prohibitions or restrictions on imports of used vehicles from the territory of another Party, except as follows:
(a) beginning January 1, 2009, Mexico may not adopt or maintain a prohibition or restriction on imports from the territories of Canada or the United States of originating used vehicles that are at least 10 years old;

(b) beginning January 1, 2011, Mexico may not adopt or maintain a prohibition or restriction on imports from the territories of Canada or the United States of originating used vehicles that are at least eight years old;

(c) beginning January 1, 2013, Mexico may not adopt or maintain a prohibition or restriction on imports from the territories of Canada or the United States of originating used vehicles that are at least six years old;

(d) beginning January 1, 2015, Mexico may not adopt or maintain a prohibition or restriction on imports from the territories of Canada or the United States of originating used vehicles that are at least four years old;


(e) beginning January 1, 2017, Mexico may not adopt or maintain a prohibition or restriction on imports from the territories of Canada or the United States of originating used vehicles that are at least two years old; and ..."
=======================================

So, in plain English, Mexico legally agreed under NAFTA, to allow 4 year old and older vehicles to be imported as of Jan. 1 2015 - which fits what's happened at the border these past 6 years.

Again: Note that NAFTA clearly prohibits Mexico from enforcing their "8-9 year old vehicle" restrictions/policy on qualifying US and Canadian NAFTA vehicles.

... Our general advice is:
~ Know all applicable aspects of the troika of US, NAFTA, and Mexican laws, and then
~ Contact a good licensed broker to meet both US export requirements and Mexican import requirements and find out the specifics of how vehicle imports work & cost,

especially if you have a NAFTA qualifying vehicle - 4 years old or older - being imported at the border.

Happy Trails,
steve
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Mar 28, 2015, 10:03 AM)


cbviajero

Mar 28, 2015, 10:43 AM

Post #25 of 55 (11167 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] US Car Export Laws and CBP Interpretation

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I've heard rumors that now only Mexican citizens will be allowed to import vehicles,anybody else heard that?
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