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tashby


Apr 3, 2014, 11:56 AM

Post #1 of 10 (12564 views)

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To condescend

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Boy have I hit the wall on this one.

What I want to communicate is the idea, in English, of "I don't want to condescend...." or "I don't want to sound condescending...." meaning behaving or speaking as if from a superior position or intelligence.

The verb condescender exists in Spanish, but doesn't appear to communicate the same idea, and as far as I can tell, simply means to agree to or cede something.

Back and forthing between dictionaries hasn't gotten me very far. About the closest thing I've found is altivo, which I guess means haughty or arrogant.

Any ideas on this? Am I not understanding the verb condescender correctly, or fully?



mcm

Apr 3, 2014, 1:54 PM

Post #2 of 10 (12554 views)

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Re: [tashby] To condescend

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I'll be interested in hearing what more expert Spanish speakers have to say, also, but it one possibility would be ''tratar con prepotencia'' -- to treat (someone) with arrogance. Prepotencia is perhaps a bit stronger than what you're trying to convey, but I do hear it used in similar contexts.


cbviajero

Apr 3, 2014, 4:00 PM

Post #3 of 10 (12546 views)

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Re: [mcm] To condescend

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Maybe (No quiero sonar arrogante or presumido) would work?


(This post was edited by cbviajero on Apr 3, 2014, 4:12 PM)


Maesonna

Apr 3, 2014, 4:19 PM

Post #4 of 10 (12538 views)

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Re: [tashby] To condescend

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I agree you have correctly understood condescender, which doesn’t have the negative connotation that it does in English, and the options suggested for conveying the English meaning of “condescend” are good ones.

I found it interesting to note that apparently in 19th-century English (like Jane Austen), “condescend” in English didn’t have the meaning that it does today, and perhaps was somewhat closer to the meaning that condescender still has in Spanish.

E.g. “She [Lady Catherine] had even condescended to advise him [Mr. Collins] to marry as soon as he could, provided he chose with discretion; and had once paid him a visit in his humble parsonage.” “But she is perfectly amiable, and often condescends to drive by my humble abode in her little phaeton and ponies.”
“He [Mr. Darcy] is the kind of man, indeed, to whom I [Mr. Bennet] should never dare refuse anything, which he condescended to ask.”


Bennie García

Apr 3, 2014, 5:16 PM

Post #5 of 10 (12525 views)

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Re: [tashby] To condescend

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Pedante or presumido will work. Soberbio is another option.


(This post was edited by Bennie García on Apr 3, 2014, 5:33 PM)


tashby


Apr 3, 2014, 6:25 PM

Post #6 of 10 (12512 views)

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Re: [tashby] To condescend

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Thanks everyone! I had a feeling it would amount to groping around for the concept, rather than a synonym. In fact, in my Spanish class today I had to tell my teacher, "I'll get back to you on what I'm trying to communicate." jajaja. Now I can.

Maesonna, thanks also for the reminder of how "alive" English is. Having read all of Austen's books more than once (Eng. Lit. major....guilty), it was a pleasant reminder. A favorite writer of mine. Also, from those examples, it's easy to imagine how the meaning of the word could evolve.


(This post was edited by tashby on Apr 3, 2014, 6:28 PM)


tashby


Apr 8, 2014, 6:16 PM

Post #7 of 10 (12411 views)

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Re: [tashby] To condescend

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Today I gave my Spanish teacher context as to what I was trying to communicate. (He doesn't really speak English.) When I used "pedante"...."presumido"...."arrogante"....y "soberbio", he completely understood what I was getting at. We even talked about how the word has likely evolved in English. Thanks everyone.


zaragemca

May 2, 2014, 12:00 PM

Post #8 of 10 (12130 views)

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Re: [tashby] To condescend

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 Greetings. there should be caution not to confuse the term with the verb, 'CONDENSAR', which mean to make something less fluid, like, Leche Condensada. Gerry Zaragemca
International Club of Percussionists


sioux4noff

Jun 4, 2014, 11:12 AM

Post #9 of 10 (11674 views)

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Re: [zaragemca] To condescend

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In English, we don't confuse condense and condescend so it should be easy to keep them apart in Spanish.


zaragemca

Jun 5, 2014, 11:01 AM

Post #10 of 10 (11633 views)

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Re: [sioux4noff] To condescend

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Welcome. It is different in Spanish, because we use ''region' names for the same subject, depending the country. You brother, Gerry Zaragemca
International Club of Percussionists
 
 
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