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megamail

Feb 1, 2014, 5:55 PM

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treating a brick deck

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I wonder if anyone out there has experience with bricks breaking down in composition. we have a concrete deck which is also the roof for our living room and dining room. The contractor put a one inch brick onto top of the concrete, I guess to make it look more finished. well over the five years here the brick has been breaking down, like to a powder. in an effort to save them I painted them with a red impermiazante. most of the areas are OK, but the areas where water comes off the the tile roof has really peeled away. now what to do. any advice would be most welcome. This is on the ocean, so everything needs constant maintenance.



Adios

Feb 2, 2014, 10:10 AM

Post #2 of 11 (22713 views)

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Re: [megamail] treating a brick deck

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Our newly acquired home has several kinds of brick and stone walls, fireplaces, walkways etc. I have slowly been sealing them with FesterBond (Adhesive for Concrete). It ain't cheap - I got some at 325 pesos per galon and some at 550 pesos. But I liked it because I could just open the can and use it and not have to mix 3 different components together and worrying about using it quickly.

I just finished a wall which had orange cinder-block like bricks. Some of the bricks were "sandy". The wall looks great now.


sparks


Feb 2, 2014, 10:51 AM

Post #3 of 11 (22706 views)

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Re: [megamail] treating a brick deck

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The about 3/4"x10x10 brick tiles they put on my roof were to add slope and insulation. They were then covered with a cement wash to protect them and detour water. Since has been painted with impermeabilizante. Never had to do with looks.

Chip them out and replace the crumbling ones is probably best

Sparks Mexico Blog - Sparks Costalegre


megamail

Feb 4, 2014, 12:32 PM

Post #4 of 11 (22639 views)

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Re: [sparks] treating a brick deck

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thanks so much, I have now discovered that impermiazante is not meant for decks where you have moving furniture or people, so more thought needs to go into this. thanks for your suggestions


megamail

Feb 4, 2014, 12:34 PM

Post #5 of 11 (22637 views)

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Re: [charlie131120] treating a brick deck

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thanks charlie,
I will check out fester bond... one component, I like that...
meg


rvgringo

Feb 5, 2014, 8:27 AM

Post #6 of 11 (22603 views)

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Re: [megamail] treating a brick deck

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You may want to follow the advice given by Sparks: Chip out and replace any that are in poor condition. Then, if you are going to use the roof for foot traffic and furniture, consider adding glazed ceramic floor tiles. They will stand up to your needs. They will also eliminate the need for impermializante every few years, etc.


AlanMexicali


Feb 5, 2014, 8:46 AM

Post #7 of 11 (22600 views)

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Re: [rvgringo] treating a brick deck

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In Reply To
You may want to follow the advice given by Sparks: Chip out and replace any that are in poor condition. Then, if you are going to use the roof for foot traffic and furniture, consider adding glazed ceramic floor tiles. They will stand up to your needs. They will also eliminate the need for impermializante every few years, etc.


In 2009 I remodled my 30 year old house in Mexicali. I replaced 300 of the thousands of 6X6 clay floor tiles with a bargain priced tile both inside and out, The floors inside and back patio, steps and sidewalks had them. I also added a 15 ft X 15ft covered patio which I tiled with 250 12X12 saltillo [ladrillo] cheap tiles.

3 years later the rain running off my roof deterioated the tiles that where under the patio roof and house roof.

The 30 year old tiles I had replaced did not deterioate after rain runoff from the roof. I replaced them because they were cracked and chipped.

In conclusión I discovered some tiles of ladrillo [brick] have far too much sand filler in them and that is why they are cheap to buy.

If I had spent more than $0.50 US each on the 300 6X6 and $0.70 US each on the 250 12X12 ladrillo tiles I would not have had this problem.


(This post was edited by AlanMexicali on Feb 5, 2014, 8:47 AM)


megamail

Feb 5, 2014, 8:59 AM

Post #8 of 11 (22588 views)

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Re: [rvgringo] treating a brick deck

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we've been thinking about that too. but aren't they slippery when wet?


sparks


Feb 5, 2014, 10:27 AM

Post #9 of 11 (22575 views)

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Re: [megamail] treating a brick deck

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Bathroom tiles are azulejos antiderrapante non-slip tiles and there may be variations. With lots of water probably still slippery. Problem is I would tear up all that old tile and the impermeabilizante before putting down good tile. You might just try impermeabilizante with the fiber material and repair worn parts every couple years

Sparks Mexico Blog - Sparks Costalegre


rvgringo

Feb 5, 2014, 11:12 AM

Post #10 of 11 (22565 views)

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Re: [megamail] treating a brick deck

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If that is a concern, use textured tiles designed for sloped surfaces, like carports or sidewalks, etc. Not all glazed tiles are smooth.


megamail

Feb 5, 2014, 11:29 AM

Post #11 of 11 (22562 views)

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Re: [rvgringo] treating a brick deck

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great thanks for that info. I didn't know there were such things
 
 
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