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MarisolEnPlayas

Nov 30, 2002, 10:58 AM

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What brought you to live in Mexico

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What was the overwhelming reason you decided to move to and live in Mexico? Was it financial gain? Was it a yearning for something different? Was it the sun? The people? Political views? A "laid back" lifestyle?

Also, have you lived in any other countries besides your own country of citizenship? Do you know any people that have changed their citizenship to Mexican from the citizenship of their birth?

Do you travel from Mexico to other countries to "get away," for vacation? Or do you simply go home for vacation?

My father once told me that moving and learning about new places helps one provide meaning to their own place. When my father finally achieved some successes in his life, my family traveled to other places and I remember seeing things in so many countries that provided me with a sense of deja vu, and I didn't understand why, because I was aware that it was "foreign" to me. Oddly enough, even living in Jamaica was not foreign to me, nor Europe, nor anywhere else I've lived. I think that experiencing the world provides you with a sense of comfort no matter where you live if you approach the country without expectations and find a way to blend.

What I love about Mexico, is that it reminds me of "old Americana," when children used to play in the streets-games like "hide and go seek" or "kick the can," when children had the opportunity to be just that, CHILDREN. In San Francisco, some of the "sophistication" of the city, seemed to erase that option for children and that saddened me.



Paul Rodriguez

Nov 30, 2002, 6:18 PM

Post #2 of 25 (4965 views)

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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My reason for moving to Mexico is multifaceted: yet, basically, I am tired by the change that has come over the United States. We seem politically to be moving to a more democratic form of government - sometimes it seems like mob rule. I discern a very fascist trend both on the left and on the right.

In addition, as you pointed out, we have become so much of a consumer culture that we have carved out each segment of society and pitch our you need to buy this or that to it. Children are enticed with electronic toys, games and so on. Adults (men and women) are studied to find their fears, needs, wishes or dreams and then they pitch whatever product they can to make the victim think that this will give it to them. Of course, it doesn't, but then there is always a new and improved model to entice them again.

I'm tired of the television programming that deals with excitement rather than with entertainment. It seems that a program must jar, agitate, scare or horrify to be any good. The commercials explode with lights, banners and loud music, while the image morphs into something else. It's like being schizophrenic.

I am tired of not finding neighborhoods - finding people living in an isolated way in their house or backyard, and never coming out to meet their neighbors. I find them isolated again when they get into the car and drive away, usually alone while listening to the radio.

I am wearied by 5 and 6 year old copying the latest teenage fad (whether it be hair cuts, clothing or mannerisms.) It's like kids don't know how to be kids. I also am very tired of the political police pouncing on anyone who may say something that is not on the approved list of words.

In Mexico, I find people who are still real. Yes, they have all the faults and problems of other people, but they are different from the people I have lived with here in the U.S. I went to war and gave years of my life for my country, but I am seriously considering adding a Mexican citizenship to the one I currently have.

I guess I have more than answered you question. I'm sure that there will be many who will disagree with what I have said. Nevertheless, that's where I'm coming from.

Paul


Roses5410


Nov 30, 2002, 6:26 PM

Post #3 of 25 (4899 views)

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Re: [Paul Rodriguez] What brought you to live in Mexico

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You've hit the nail right upon the head!
I love taking pictures...check out my prints for sale @ http://Rosacalaca.dpcprints.com/


MarisolEnPlayas

Nov 30, 2002, 6:28 PM

Post #4 of 25 (4869 views)

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Re: [Paul Rodriguez] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Paul,

I admire your response. It is not for others to agree or disagree with you on YOUR reasons for moving, because they are just that...YOURS.

I like to see where people are coming from and I think this is a positive statement about Mexico.

Marisol


Rolly


Nov 30, 2002, 7:03 PM

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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The reason I live in Mexico has a name – Enrique Valdepeñas. But first a little background to this story.

In 1991 I was living in Tarzana, a barrio of Los Angeles. I lived on the remains of an old farm place – an acre of land, a 1930 farm house with an oversized 2-car detached garage which also had a small, simple maid’s room, shower and kitchen. I started and operated my engineering business out of the house. As the business grew and I added one, two and then three staff, I faced the decision to rent an office or move myself. Not wanting to pay more rent, I reluctantly I moved into the garage apartment. To call it primitive would make it sound better than it was. The shower was in the kitchen which was on the other side of the garage from the bedroom where the toilet was in the clothes closet. Smile

About six months after I moved into the garage, for one of my spring clean-up fun days, I picked up a young (25) day laborer at the local curb-side hiring hall. He was sitting on the curb looking so sad; he looked like he really needed work. I asked if he spoke English. He replied with what I later learned were his only English words: “Yes, I speak English.” Despite the language barrier, Enrique was a good worker, so I asked him back for a second day. Then I found a few other tasks for him which led to his being around for a full week. At lunch each day, with the help of my bilingual secretary, I talked with him and became impressed with his intelligence, just as I was impressed with his work efforts.

By the end of that week I was sure I had found a guy who had far more on the ball than being a curb-side day laborer, except he didn't speak English. He said he averaged finding work about two days a week (=$100). So I made him an offer: attend ESL school (English as a Second Language) each morning and work for me each afternoon and Saturdays. Thus he could learn English while earning more money than he was making from the street.

At first his tasks included mostly cleaning the office and the yard with an occasional handyman repair job. I had not yet thought of remodeling the apartment. That idea grew slowly as I observed his skills, and as I grew more unhappy with my home scene. I became convinced that we could turn that garage into a swell bachelor’s pad . Enrique's reaction was “Sometimes you are very smart, but always you are crazy.” A comment he continues to make to this day (sometimes he's right).


Well, we did. It took seven years because one of the rules I laid down was it must be a pay as we go project – no debt allowed.

Enrique originally went to Los Angeles in the late 1980’s for the purpose of making money to build a house for his family. When I met him in 1991, he had already purchased the land in a new development area of Lerdo. During the seven years that he worked for me remodeling the garage and lots of other things, he saved enough money to build his two bedroom house, so he went back to Lerdo, built his house, and got on with his life back home with his wife and 3 kids. I helped with the plans and the electrical system for his house. And then I closed my business and retired.

About 3 years later, my landlady of 20 years decided to sell “my” place. I was forced to leave my happy purple house. I considered various options, among them was Enrique’s invitation to move to Lerdo and live with him and his family. During those years that we worked together, Enrique and I had developed a strong father/son relationship, so the idea of spending my old age with him and his family was very appealing.

I was in serious need of a new adventure in my life. So why not? I don’t speak Spanish, but that had never been much of a problem on my many visits with friends in Manzanillo over the preceding ten years.

I was not very happy about leaving the place Enrique and I had built, but I have never regretted moving to Mexico. I’m here for the duration. And Enrique and I are building another house together, and I love it!

I do enjoy going back to the old country once in a while, but I’m always happy when I’m headed south toward home.

Today Enrique speaks English and is a citizen of the USA. We sometimes talk about that chance meeting and wonder how different our lives would be today except for that May morning in 1991.

This story continues on my website.


Rolly Pirate


Bill in NC

Dec 1, 2002, 6:53 PM

Post #6 of 25 (4777 views)

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Quality of care, for my mom, with early-onset dementia, now in late stage.

In 2000 mom's nursing home was having some severe problems. One day I turned on the local news and the headline was her home couldn't accept any more residents until they remedied their deficiencies.

I was tired of having my 85 year old grandmother call me almost daily upset with mom's care in that home. Other homes that could take her (mom was private pay!) weren't any better.

I chanced to run across a newsgroup posting by a retired gringo who with some others (who had run homes here in the U.S.) now offer long-term care in the Lakeside area (please note I have no connection other than being a satisfied customer)

I visited with my siblings in January 2001 and to make a long story short mom has been down there almost 2 years now.

Mom now resides in a small geriatric clinic with a caregiver ratio more than twice what I could find here in the U.S. for less than half the money.

(I'm not sure I could get the same care here in the U.S. for any amount of money)

Everyone in the family is very happy, and I sleep better at night.


CanMex

Dec 1, 2002, 7:01 PM

Post #7 of 25 (4781 views)

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Re: [Paul Rodriguez] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Paul,

Amen, to all of that.

Luc


juan david


Dec 2, 2002, 8:18 AM

Post #8 of 25 (4737 views)

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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My first Canadian escape adventure took me from Winnipeg to El Salvador for three years. Never looked at things entirely the same way after that....good opening here for anyone who wants to take a shot! Also lived in England and have had the good fortune to travel extensively around the world. All of which is to say that you develop a different way of looking at not only your own country and society, but others as well. Maybe a good bit more open, honest and accepting of the goods, bads and not importants. There are a lot of things that I value and respect about Canada, not the least of which is the opportunity it provides people who are willing to go after whatever it is that they want out of life. As for choosing to live in Mexico, this wasn't as big a leap as some other choices. It's not so far away if/when a little homesickness strikes in the first couple of years. Also, Mexico appeals to that "one more adventure" thing and the language is not so daunting as other languages. The climate beats the **** out of Canadian winters and the Mexican cultural experience is outstanding. As my wife and I talked about retiring in Mexico we shifted from "why Mexico" to "why not Mexico" At that point it was pretty much a done deal.

Ian
" let sleeping dogs lie"


arbon

Dec 2, 2002, 9:05 AM

Post #9 of 25 (4730 views)

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Marisol your new image was saved "canvas size" not image size,is this attachment what you wanted.?
Attachments: marisol.gif (7.65 KB)


MarisolEnPlayas

Dec 3, 2002, 3:12 PM

Post #10 of 25 (4636 views)

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Re: [arbon] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Arbon,

I sort of like the anonymity...I was thinking now that even a blank canvas might be nice. It allows others to color me the shade they want and gives them the feeling of being empowered...

Marisol


LaFenix

Dec 8, 2002, 6:38 PM

Post #11 of 25 (4552 views)

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Re: [ian] What brought you to live in Mexico

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I moved to Mexico for most of the reasons you all mentioned. I am scared to death about the turn in our government. As a professor of history I can see we are truly back in the gilded age of the 1880's to 1920's. Todays energy barons are the past's railroad giants.

However, I have always dreamed of living in Mexico as Mexican and Latin American history are my fields of expertise. I am comfortable in the culture and feel at home and at peace here in Playas de Tijuana. I have only been here six months but it is enough to know I won't go back to a world that does not value family and children as special spirits instead of a soccer trophy.

So I work over there and have the best of both worlds as I do understand the wrongs of our society there will turn around.


jturpen

Dec 10, 2002, 4:56 PM

Post #12 of 25 (4460 views)

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Marisol ...

I do not currently live in Mexico ... years ago I made frequent visits and loved that feeling that is described/defined by those who responded. As I sit here replying to your post, the television is running a news story about 'What would Jesus drive'. Does the insanity ever end?

I was born in the post-WWII timeframe, grew up in the socially explosive 60's and 70's. I have lived in many states in the US (currently in Idaho) and as others have pointed out the USA is slipping day by day into a very strange place. Only time will tell what will be the outcome ...

From all that I read on the forums (and the many research efforts I have done) ... Mexico has some serious problems ... but I will soon trade the ones in the USA for those of Mexico. It is all about the human experience ... and all the Mexicans I know are better humans ... plain and simple. I pray that Mexicans will never 'Americanize' themselves.



Joe


JudyinKC

Dec 10, 2002, 6:48 PM

Post #13 of 25 (4442 views)

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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We aren't moved to Mexico yet, but plan to be by the middle of March. I don't think I could express any better than you and the others have the reasons that we are moving there. We did live in Brazil for 10 years and much of Mexico's culture is similar. Speaking Portuguese fluently would making communicating in Brazil easier than it will be in my less than halting Spanish (my husband speaks much better), but I will learn. In our quest for a place to settle in Mexico we had an experience much like Rolly's meeting Enrique. We met a family that is as close to us now as any of our family in the U.S. They have made our preparations for the move so much easier than if we had been totally on our own. Thanks for your comments on your reasons.


tabascoone

Dec 10, 2002, 7:45 PM

Post #14 of 25 (4426 views)

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Well I was hesitant to reply since I do not currently live in Mexico but ,I see that I have company.

I am American, born in the U.S. of hispanic heritage and Mexican by marriage. (yes, my soulmate is a beautiful Tabasqueña)

My reasons for moving to Mexico? the people, the food, the music, the weather, the attitudes, the traditions, and most important the Mexican people prioritization of values as it should be family, religion, friends, etc, etc, where the center of existence is not around you but around the things you value most.

Recently I went on a business trip to a border town in Mexico, traffic came to stand still in my way to teh hotel while a procession honoring the virgen of Guadalupe was uner way, and NOBODY seem to be bothered with waiting. then in the way back to the states, another traffic jam, in this case while a procession of kindergarden kids (all in the city) was underway to welcome Christmas. again, nobody seem bothered, instead all I saw was smiles, no road rage for sure. I couldn't help but smile and can't wait until I move down South in the next couple of years (when I retire from the military).

During that same trip I receive the best restaurant service I could have asked for, not talking about the food now, thought it was excellent as well, but the attitude and friendliness of the hostess, made me smile from teh moment I walked until the restaurant, you CAN'T get that kind of service in the states, or at least not as of often as I have received similar service in Mexico. Yes.. everything revolves around the Mexican people, my kind of people.

Thanks Marisol for bringing the subject up, great replies, it just makes me want to move sooner. Feliz Navidad Everyone!


Elaine


Dec 11, 2002, 10:26 AM

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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I am not in Mexico, yet. Looks like I will be there some time in the spring. The main reasons, that I'm looking at Mexico as a place to hang my hat, are the climate, the people, the adventure. I am also concerned at the way life is going in the USA, the way our freedoms are being eroded. AND, I want my 15 yo son to see more of the world than he can if he stays in the USA. I want him to see that other kids can live and be happy without tons of TV and video games. He complains when I won't buy him everything he sees on TV or hears of from his friends. I was able to block a lot of that when he was younger, but it gets harder to do as he gets older. I think the best lessons of his life will be learned in Mexico, and they won't be in a classroom! I want him to see that people can be happy without all the whistles and bells that American advertising would have him believe are necessities!

***********************************************************
When one door closes, another opens. Some people are so busy looking at the door that has closed, they don't see the door that has opened. Keep looking for those open doors.
***********************************************************


esperanza

Dec 11, 2002, 1:38 PM

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Re: [Elaine] What brought you to live in Mexico

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This post troubles me for a variety of reasons. It's hard to think that life in Mexico might be held over a typically American teenager's head as an example of...how shall I call this...the cheerfully less materialistic? Most of the kids I know here in Mexico want what the kids want in the USA~a razor scooter, video games, CDs, DVDs, and a portable player for them, stylish clothes with the 'right' labels, makeup, et cetera ad infinitum. TV is ominipresent here, and with it, commercials, and with those, the same kinds of consumerist desires that exist in the States. In fact, in large part it's the USA that creates the products as well as the commercials that impart the desires. All those whistles and bells this poster mentions? I call them cultural imperialism, and in my mind it's one of the less attractive attributes of the USA.

What I notice about some expatriates, current and wannabe, is a vague and amorphous desire to live with 'the people' of Mexico in 'the adventure' of Mexico. One of the things I believe today (although I'm open to changing this belief, but you'll have to convince me) is that life wherever it is lived is an adventure, people are people no matter their latitude and longitude, and that wherever I go, there I am. In other words, it's more about what's inside me than it is about what's outside me...and it's definitely more about me than it is about 'them'. Mexico is not a geographic cure for what ails us.

I agree that life in a culture other than one's native culture gives an invaluable perspective on life in general. The old saw "Travel is broadening" is still true. But life in Mexico isn't junior year abroad, and it isn't an object lesson in different value systems, although new values may be learned along the way. How much better to have imparted those values to one's child prior to making this kind of move, and how difficult that is!

And the climate? There are large sections of Mexico where the climate is harsh, frigid in Winter and scorching in Summer~and those conditions are made harsher by the lack of creature comforts to which most people from the USA are accustomed. Obviously we don't have blizzards and sub-zero Farenheit temperatures, but with the exception of certain areas, it isn't eternally Spring here. Be careful where you decide to hang that hat!

So...I see a post like this and I sigh a little.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Elaine


Dec 11, 2002, 4:28 PM

Post #17 of 25 (4341 views)

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Re: [esperanza] What brought you to live in Mexico

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I'm afraid you may have read into my post more, and less, than I meant it to contain. Mexico is not being "held over" my son's head. Far from it, he is as eager to experience a new culture as I am. He is looking forward to making many friends and learning to speak fluent Spanish. What I hope he learns is what some people never learn, that different is not necessarily bad, just different. I want him to appreciate and respect other cultures. My son is not a "typical" teen from the USA. Some of that may be because I have home schooled him for several years and he has not had as much "peer pressure" as most public school children have. He has developed his own personality AND values without some other kid telling him what he should or shouldn't do or like. I am quite pleased with the man he is becoming. He is much more than I expected. Some of the things he does and says, impresses me with the degree of maturity he shows and his kindness and compassion for others. Other times, he is just a kid and makes my hair turn gray!

As far as "living with the people", you bet I want to! I lived with the native people when I lived in Japan and Okinawa. I learned to appreciate the culture much more than if I had been surrounded by other people from the USA. My husband has lived in more countries than I have and as many times as he could, he also lived "with the people." It is the best way to really get to know a country and a people.

You are right, life is an adventure no mater where you hang your hat, if you look for the right door. I can not say that I have not enjoyed even one place I have lived and I've lived more than a few places! But, any trip is a lesson, heck, all of life is a lesson, if one is wise enough to learn.

And the climate? I've been watching the weather in Mexico for the past few years and pretty much know what to expect and where to expect it. And if it's not as I expect, well, I'm from Oklahoma and here we say that if you don't like the weather just hang around a day or so and it'll probably change to something you do like. So, I'm flexible.

Creature comforts? I almost laughed out loud when I read that. I now live in a very nice home, but that was not always the case. I would love to have had you see how I lived just a few years ago. Was out in the woods, with a water well that was an adventure in itself just to keep working and not freezing up in the winter. We had indoor plumbing that would go out at fairly regular intervals and then we put the old "out house" to use. I never walked outside after dark with out my shotgun because we had some pretty brave coyotes and mountain lions around. I've raised my own food and processed it. I've raised my own animals and took care of the processing of them for meals. My nearest neighbor was over a mile away any way you went. And during this time it was just me and my son. I took care of us, even when we had a stalker coming around! Why would I live in such a place? Because there is nothing like waking up and seeing deer in your front yard.

I am sorry if my post upset you and made you sigh. It certainly wasn't meant to do so. :)

***********************************************************
When one door closes, another opens. Some people are so busy looking at the door that has closed, they don't see the door that has opened. Keep looking for those open doors.
***********************************************************


jturpen

Dec 11, 2002, 5:37 PM

Post #18 of 25 (4322 views)

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Re: [esperanza] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Esperanza ...

I think I understand the source of your sigh ... but I am not certain. Please let me share a small part of where I come from.

In the past 25 odd years I have known a lady who is a relocated Mexican (let's call her Margaret). She migrated to the US when she was young. She married a man who was in the US illegally and went through all the hoops to get him to be a US citizen. Their family seems to have an endless stream of relatives coming into the area from all parts of Mexico (mostly from Michoacan and Jalisco). There have been many occasions where our families have gotten together and there have hundreds of different people with whom I've chatted (me in my limited spanish and they excitedly in their new language).

I have an advanced degree from San Diego State University in behavioral sciences and have paid close attention to the actions/interactions/reactions of these Mexicans. While each is a distinct and unique individual, they all have a certain shared common zest for life. I have been told from my friends who have been to Europe that there are places there that equate to what I described about Mexicans.

I think what I am trying to say is that while recognizing that there are influences and attitudes that are impacting those birth Mexicans, but from the perspective of 'life values', the US is way behind what is (referencing only my experiences with those mentioned above) 'the human experience' from Mexicans.

Come to think of it maybe it's only those from the central part of Mexico. I know nobody from Oaxaca or those way down near the border places. Just teasing here.

Anyway ... take care

Joe



MarisolEnPlayas

Dec 11, 2002, 6:25 PM

Post #19 of 25 (4315 views)

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Re: [esperanza] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Esperanza,

While I undestand the concerns of Elaine, I have to say I absolutely agree with you. I'm afraid Elaine may find that in many ways, Mexico can be in some cases a great deal more proactive towards trying to obtain the "material goods" in life, and therefore, her son may well fall into a deeper grasp of this behavior.

I must say that I applaud any mother that is diligently attempting to teach her son the values of being a good citizen, and attempting to demonstrate the disparities of various lifestyles. However, I feel that Elaine may well learn a contrary lesson to the one she is attempting to teach her son, once she moves here. On the other hand, her son may experience some wonderful access to other types of living that will become an asset to his future.

Some people assume that Mexico is a country of the "have nots" and once they move here, learn that there is a great abundance of money is some circles. I suspect that most expatriates do not live in the manner in which the less economically entitled Mexicans live, and therefore, they tend to associate with most folks that have an economic status that is not of what she suspects. I admit freely, that I don't choose to live in meager circumstances, and indeed many of my neighbors have a great deal more than I do economically, and educations that surpass my mere 4 years of University training, which is why they have no problem purchasing the $200.000.00 homes in my neighborhood and purchasing all the anemities that go with this lifestyle.

Others will argue that there are many areas of Mexico, where people do not have this economic status, and that is correct, but I rarely see expatriates living among those people, although it does happen.

Thank you for your post. It clarifies the fact that Mexico is as diverse as any other country and consequently has the same issues.

Marisol


MarisolEnPlayas

Dec 11, 2002, 6:31 PM

Post #20 of 25 (4302 views)

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Re: [Elaine] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Elaine,

Welcome to Mexico! It sounds like you indeed have a healthy grasp of what you are about to experience and other experiences that will make your adaption less stressful.

Your son sounds like my son, a normal teenager with normal expectations. You may find the same types of teenagers down here. By the way, my son is 28 and living in the Bay Area and I underwent many of the same concerns...which is why I now why I have so many lines...LOL
I feel raising children in other cultures is EXTREMELY beneficial to their upbringing. I am a recipient of that, and my son is as well.

I wish you great joy in Mexico!

Marisol


Abq

Dec 11, 2002, 7:13 PM

Post #21 of 25 (4302 views)

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When You're Right, You're Right

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Nice to see such a well thought out post!


Elaine


Dec 11, 2002, 8:28 PM

Post #22 of 25 (4288 views)

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Marisol,

First I might say that my son is not totally absorbed by TV and video games. Our house could pass as a small library and he has read most of the books we have. In fact, he taught himself to read at the age of 3. Surprised the heck out of me and everyone else! That was only the first of many surprises. I really don't like to talk about him that much. I prefer to let people meet him and form their own opinions. Besides, if I brag about him, he'll do something really dumb the first time one of you meets him and I'll look like an idiot!

I am not so naive as to think that all Mexicans live in huts without running water or electricity or that they don't desire the same things that anyone else would. Maybe I should have said that I have had friends from Mexico and further south into Central and South America. I have learned a little about the culture already. I don't know that I've met anyone that I don't like. I may not have liked things that one person or the other has done, but I find it very hard to dislike people.

I'm wondering what it is about Mexico that you seem to be trying to warn me about????? I'm not good at guessing games. Why not come right out and tell me? Seems like there are plenty of people from the USA and Canada that like the area, but maybe all of them are lying about the place????

***********************************************************
When one door closes, another opens. Some people are so busy looking at the door that has closed, they don't see the door that has opened. Keep looking for those open doors.
***********************************************************


MarisolEnPlayas

Dec 11, 2002, 9:26 PM

Post #23 of 25 (4282 views)

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Re: [Elaine] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Elaine,

<I'm wondering what it is about Mexico that you seem to be trying to warn me about????? I'm not good at guessing games. Why not come right out and tell me? Seems like there are plenty of people from the USA and Canada that like the area, but maybe all of them are lying about the place????>

I'm not sure what you mean by this. I don't feel that I was trying to warn you about anything, because it has been my experience in traveling and living in other countries that everyone walks away with a different experience and lessons. I wouldn't presume to figure that your experience would mirror mine, simply because after being told how "dangerous" Jamaica was, and especially Kingston, I found the information and warnings to be illogical, based on my own experiences and years there.

The only thing I openly commented on, was your comments in your first post that appeared to presume that his lifestyle would dramatically change. As Esperanza stated, it's unlikely and I added that based on the areas you probably would find acceptable for living it would be very unlikely, based on the friends he would associate with. That's not to say that you wouldn't choose a house in a more rural area, without the comforts that most Americans would have, but then the experience would STILL be different than that of the Mexicans living in that manner, because unlike them, your son would be endowed with the option to go "home," eventually. Where the Mexicans would never think of that option as indeed it doesn't exist.

Also, with a teenager, it's unlikely that you would really choose to live in that fashion, because it would be highly unusual based on the average lifestyle of the expatriates here. Is that such a mystery?

I don't do guessing games well either. So I tend to tell it like it is. If that is offensive to you, then please understand that it is my particular manner and not intended to be offensive at all. I'm not silly enough though, to not realize that some people read more into what I post than what I say.

Marisol


Elaine


Dec 12, 2002, 10:01 AM

Post #24 of 25 (4257 views)

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Re: [MarisolEnPlayas] What brought you to live in Mexico

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We both may have misunderstood each other's post and, for that, I am sorry.

I do see my son's life as changing when we move to Mexico. Not "dramatically" but quite a bit. I do want you to know that I don't think our experience would be the same as the Mexicans living there. That would be impossible and I did not intend to give the impression that I thought it was possible. I only want to get to know the country and people more than I do now. As far as me living like the average expatriate down there, I fully intend to start out where there is a support group of other expatriates, however, knowing my husband and myself the way I do, that is not where we will probably end up. My Spanish (what there is of it) is very rusty and I need to sharpen it. I have done the unusual all my life and enjoyed it to the fullest, sometimes over the protests of my family. They thought I should marry a nice home town guy and live my life out less than 20 miles from them. I don't think they ever really understood my desire for something more out of life.

I did not take your post as offensive, just puzzling.

The main part of your post that I considered a veiled warning was, "However, I feel that Elaine may well learn a contrary lesson to the one she is attempting to teach her son, once she moves here." If I did take that wrong, could you explain it? I may just be having a "senior moment".

Thanks,

***********************************************************
When one door closes, another opens. Some people are so busy looking at the door that has closed, they don't see the door that has opened. Keep looking for those open doors.
***********************************************************


MarisolEnPlayas

Dec 12, 2002, 1:58 PM

Post #25 of 25 (4244 views)

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Re: [Elaine] What brought you to live in Mexico

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Elaine,

I agree that this form of communication leaves a great deal up to individual interpretation sometimes and error in interpretation and it happens to all of us. It’s delightful when people handle this as wonderfully as you have without becoming rude. And if I offended you then I apologize as well.

When I said the following: "However, I feel that Elaine may well learn a contrary lesson to the one she is attempting to teach her son, once she moves here." I was saying that if your primary purpose in moving to Mexico is to teach your son (very correctly I might add) that people can survive without the luxuries of material consumerism, then he may see that statement is not necessarily true. In other words, it may solidify his feelings that “consumerism is the norm all over the world.”

I think once you move into your community and see the buying trends of many Mexicans, you may sing a different tune. What I’ve found, is that in the communities I’ve lived in, where people are living “the good life,” many of my neighbors are examples of why people (like me, who work in Marketing and Advertising) are now gearing our marketing campaigns towards Latin American market shares. I used to work for Capcom Entertainment in the Bay Area, and we found that Brazilian and Latin American market shares were some of the most lucrative markets, because consumerism has caught on like wild fires in these markets.

Therefore, your son may find that all over the world his interest in CD’s DVD’s and the other things that teenagers crave, is absolutely NORMAL…including Mexico. As a matter of fact, in Mexico, sometimes the teenagers feel they have to possess it first, because they are trying to fit in with a model on television of what they see as “normal American” lifestyles. My neighbors kids for instance, each have a portable DVD MP3 players, simply because they saw it on the computer and felt that they had to be the first to possess this item. They have digital cameras, the latest technology in portable CD players and so many electronics that one wonders if their father has a dedicated investment in the Sony Corporation. Even the parents rushed out to buy the first automotive multimedia entertainment system for BOTH of their cars, and after that, you could pretty much watch each neighbor one by one duplicate the purchase.

This may not be the norm in all neighborhoods, but the areas where families are living in typically “American-style” it certainly is not abnormal. With Latin American Marketing and Advertising campaigns growing in strenght, sadly, I don’t see a trend away from consumerism down here.

Marisol

BTW, I don't think you were having a senior moment, I think your probably read me correct on that statement, if you review what I wrote above.
 
 
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