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jbowler

Jul 10, 2013, 4:01 PM

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solar panels

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After receiving an obscenely high A/C electrical bill here in Mazatlan, I am looking at whether I should invest in solar panels. Does anyone have any experience in this area? My consumption was 13,662 over the past year, but after 12,000 kwh, CFE kicks into a higher bracket so that we are no longer eligible for the seasonal subsidy. Any info on this would be very appreciated.thank you.



rockydog85251

Jul 10, 2013, 4:40 PM

Post #2 of 23 (36181 views)

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Re: [jbowler] solar panels

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There is a company here in MZT that does solar panels..........not sure of the cost. I believe they advertise on whatsupmaz.org. Good luck and give us an update.
Willie


tonyburton


Jul 10, 2013, 4:42 PM

Post #3 of 23 (36179 views)

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Re: [jbowler] solar panels

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This is a topic that has come up occasionally. Our resident expert is Pete Johanson.
For a list of the 65 previous posts about solar panels, see:
http://www.mexconnect.com/...p;sb=score&mh=50


YucaLandia


Jul 10, 2013, 6:01 PM

Post #4 of 23 (36160 views)

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Re: [jbowler] solar panels

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If you are slightly able to do minor constructions, you can import some very fine 200W solar panels from China for roughly $200 USD a panel - because the Chinese government is giving very heavy subsidies to their solar panel producers.

The panels come with fine aluminum frames that are easy to mount.

A good grid-tied inverter costs about $2,000 - $2,500 USD. By using a grid tied inverter to produce 120V AC power, you can then get CFE to change you over to a meter that (metaphorically) "runs backwards" during the times of day when your solar system is making more power than you use at that time. This means that a big solar system actually feeds power back onto the grid during the daytime - giving you credits on your bill. Then, at night, your house automatically "switches" back to CFE power - meaning you need NO batteries.

If you set-up ten 200W panels, and keep them clean, and keep them oriented towards the sun between 9AM and 3PM, then you can easily get 2 kW per hour during full sun times.

A few questions spring to mind:
~ We need to know how many cloudy/overcast days you can have every year.
~ It is helpful to know how many hours of good sunshine you get on the shortest days of the year...
~ Do you have space to mount panels, in a way where the air can circulate around them, keeping them cool (do not plan to mount them in boxes or other enclosed spaces - instead mounting them in configurations that allow air flow around them).

Answers to these questions allows one to calculate how many panels you need to mostly offset your DAC rate power bills. Actually, if you can just get your monthly moving average for a year, below the maximum allowed average power usage to keep the subsidies, we could quickly get your net CFE power usage well below those thresholds. ...

Guessing an average 7 hours per day of good quality sunlight on your panels**, we can expect 14 kW per day. That turns into 420 kWh per month. That further translates to roughly a 5000 kWh per year reduction in your CFE usage, for a rough cost of $5,000 - $6,000 USD if you do it yourself. Similar Mexican supplied and Mexican installed systems can cost $12,000 USD or higher. Depending on what CFE Tarifa Zone you are in, the system could pay for itself in as little as 3 years like in Tarifa Zone 1B (while we in Merida, Tarifa Zone 1C, pay a lower $2.7 pesos per kWh for Excedente Rates which translates to a savings of $13,800 pesos per year - and a full payback in 5 years). Note that when you your running average CFE power usage gets consistently below that monthly DAC threshhold, you start getting the 3X lower power rates on the rest of your power, and you also recover the 78% government subsidy - giving some people a full payback in 2 years... (because of the Chinese govt. subsidies lowering the prices on panels ordered directly from China).

If you want more than 5000 kWhr of solar power per year, we need to know how many hours of sunlight you expect per year, and then you can extrapolate from our 10 panels of 200 W each at 7 hours per day of sunlight - model. ... e.g. If you want 2X more power, then double the number of panels - but still use the same good quality grid-tied inverter - so, you could double the size of the 5000 kWhr per year system for an expenditure of roughly another... $3,000 USD.

Note: The Chinese panels are expected to have 15 yr life spans producing roughly 90% of their rated values, and that output then falls gradually for the following 10 to 15 years. Also note that combination of the heavy Chinese Govt. subsidies of solar panel production, and the higher efficiency of the newer generation panels mean full system $$ paybacks much faster than people who bought PV systems even just 5 years ago.
steve

**The averages listed above are for very good conditions for solar power - like in Sonora and US Southwest states like Arizona and New Mexico. If Mazatlan has significantly less sun than Sonora, et al, then adjust that 5000 kWhr per year down proportionately - reducing the solar PV power expected by the % reduction of sunny days from the calculated 360 sunny days.

All of the estimates provided above are for a system we set up on a friend's home 6 months ago - where he has reduced his power bills from a previous $400 USD a month, down to $67 pesos on his last bill. ... using panels imported from China, and a grid-tied inverter imported from the USA - all at a total cost that was less than half of quotes from local Mexican firms.
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Jul 10, 2013, 8:02 PM)


johanson


Jul 10, 2013, 6:06 PM

Post #5 of 23 (36157 views)

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Re: [tonyburton] solar panels

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Yes photo-voltaic panels are getting to be a better and better deal, since the cost of electricity is continually increasing, especially if you are paying at the high unsubsidized rate. Sadly CFE is talking about eliminating the subsidy they are now paying should you be using less than a certain amount of electricity.

Many of the solar panel distributers suggest that the payback period (if you are paying at the high DAC rate) is as low as 5 & 1/2 years, these days. When I bought my system in 2008 the equipment (solar panels, inverter, etc) was more expensive and the cost of electricity was lower. Using those outdated figures I computed my payback time to be almost 9 years.

Whatever they payback period, I love my photo-voltaic solar panels.

PS my hot water solar panels have an even faster payback period.

Why not take your latest CFE bill with you and talk to the local solar dealers. I used EsunEnergy which has offices in Guadalajara, Ajijic (near Wallmart) and I believe their West Coast office is near PV.

Go slow check things out. There is much to learn.

Good luck


YucaLandia


Jul 10, 2013, 8:31 PM

Post #6 of 23 (36116 views)

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Re: [jbowler] solar panels

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A final observation: Plan to set up your panels to easily adjust to be able to point both North and then South of horizontal.

Since Mazatlan is reasonably close to the Tropic of Cancer, the sun is roughly directly overhead only at solar noon around the Summer Solstice for your latitude - and the sun is in the northern sky the rest of the day between early May and early August. This means you likely would want to adjust the positions of your solar panels about 3 times a year - ranging from North to South.

For a month before (and after) the Summer Solstice, you would want the panels tilted to aim at point in the sky somewhat north, to take best advantage of morning and afternoon sun (with the sun rising and setting in the north and with the sun directly overhead during midday.

Then between roughly March 20 to early May, and again for early August to Sept 20, you would want the panels tilted slightly south (because the sun rises at due East and sets at due west on the Equinoxes - and it dips south at solar noon).

Then between the Fall Equinox and the Spring Equinox (mid Sept to mid March), you want the panels to definitely point south, as the rising and setting suns go further southward, until the sunrise and sunset peak southernmost at the Winter Solstice, and the mid-day sun comes from an even more southern position through the winter.

If you want best power output, plan a 4'th panel position adjustment for the 2 months around the Winter Solstice - aiming them even further south - and have the panels at an intermediate southern setting between the Fall Equinox and mid November, and then again intermediate south from Jan 20 to the Spring Equinox.

I mention these things, because most Mexican commercial dealers/installers pick a single Southern aimed fixed position, that only works well for about 3 months of the year**, and they install the panels on brackets/legs that cannot be moved. Qualified experts, instead, build and install frames that allow you to easily and quickly tilt the panels to aim them at the sun for at least 3 different alignments per year - and if well designed, with quick disconnects, you can have a set-up that also allows one person to quickly take the panels out of the brackets for safe storage during hurricanes in coastal regions of Mexico.

To take best advantage of the sun: Think of panel mounts made with tubular steel A-frames, with the panels mounted on teeter-totters for quick and easy adjustments around a central axis (where you remove a clip, tilt the panel, and re-clip it into the new position) to track the sun's actual path. If you choose the single alignment, fixed orientation mount system offered by typical solar salesmen/installers**, you will lose roughly 40% of the potential power (and as much as 60% if poorly aimed) - and single orientations would drive you to purchase an extra 40% (or up to 60%) more panels to meet the 5000 kWhr per year power outputs described in the earlier email.
steve


**Also note that a southern pointed single-position mount commonly used by Mexican commercial PV dealers, gives you maximum power during the winter months around Christmas time - and I doubt that your heavy electrical usage (air conditioners and pool pump) peak at Christmas. Most Mexican homes electricity usage peaks in the hot summer months, and fixed orientation south-tilted panels are then at their least effective output, at the time of year you need them most.

The commercial PV dealers common usage of a single orientation also explains why they predict 5 year pay back periods vs. 2 to 3 year paybacks for a right-sized, adjustable position PV solar system.

So, yes, this may sound like a bit of a hassle, but if it only takes 10 minutes to adjust all the panels, and you save as much as $1,500 USD in up-front extra panel costs, and you can pay off your system in 2 years less, then, I'd choose the option of spending 40 minutes a year adjusting panels. *grin*
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Jul 10, 2013, 9:00 PM)


Sculptari

Jul 11, 2013, 10:09 AM

Post #7 of 23 (36029 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] solar panels

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Where did you buy your 10 solar panels from in China? Isn't there a 40% duty in place for Chinese origin imports? Who fabricated your custom brackets, are they interested in more work?
no longer active on Mexconnect


YucaLandia


Jul 11, 2013, 2:05 PM

Post #8 of 23 (35994 views)

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Re: [Sculptari] solar panels

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The friend bought them direct from China, from the manufacturer, with free shipping...

As a "green" product, Mexican Aduana is supposed to charge NOTHING, but he wound up paying them 15% => $3,250 pesos on a $25,000 total import purchase. He saved so much $$ on the direct-ship personal purchase (versus the 2X to 3X markup charged by Mexican solar firms) that the $3,250 peso duty was peanuts in his perception.

I am fabricating the brackets for him, versus his current crude cinder-block arrangements. I'm welding-up 1" galvanized square tubing into low profile A-frames - with braces angling down off the panels to the A-frame legs... with pre-drilled holes to pin the braces to the A-frames at pre-determined positions to give the 4 different angles for the 4 different times of the year.

These materials and designs have worked well, even in our harsh Yucatecan salty, corrosive, high humidity, high heat conditions and high winds: I have welded up a series of these types of frames for ladders, and for various roofing skeletons (for polycarbonate covered roofs and awnings), over the past 8 years, and they have all worked well - even when supporting my expanding girth. *grin*

The central axles that the panels teeter-totter around lie in U-brackets (saddles) at the tops of the A-Frames, with simple hasps across the tops of the U's that are pinned shut to secure the axle. The key movable intersection points also have rubber bushings to keep them quiet and tight.

Pull and re-install two (2) pins (where the braces attach to the A-frame) to change the tilt on a set of panels. ...

Pull two (2) pins to open the hasps on the U-Saddles to be able to lift the set of panels out of the frame - for storage during strong storms...

Specific dimensions depend on your roof size, shape, and desired panel configurations.
steve

Simple reliable engineering used since Egyptian and Greek times. No rocket science.
steve
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Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com


salto_jorge

Jul 11, 2013, 4:20 PM

Post #9 of 23 (35977 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] solar panels

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Pictures please !


YucaLandia


Jul 11, 2013, 4:33 PM

Post #10 of 23 (35974 views)

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Re: [salto_jorge] solar panels

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Good Point!
Gotta charge up the batteries and find the up-load cable for my peculiar Olympus camera.
steve
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Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com


DavidHF

Jul 12, 2013, 5:48 AM

Post #11 of 23 (35943 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] solar panels

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I've owner a PV solar system for almost 3 years. My suggestions:
1. Use ONLY a reputable installer. Talk to every one of them who works in your area; at a minimum these should included E2Energias and ESun Solar. Unless of course you read Spanish and and can negotiate the buy-back argreement with CFE.
2. Use ONLY US or Canadian made components. Chinese makers have been dropping like flies.
3. Forget about adjusting your massive grid to get the last 1/2 hour of sun power. Instead, go on your roof at least once a month and clean the bird droppings and dust from the panels.

Feel free to PM for more info.


YucaLandia


Jul 12, 2013, 6:36 AM

Post #12 of 23 (35927 views)

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Re: [DavidHF] solar panels

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In Reply To
I've owner a PV solar system for almost 3 years. My suggestions:
1. Use ONLY a reputable installer. Talk to every one of them who works in your area; at a minimum these should included E2Energias and ESun Solar. Unless of course you read Spanish and and can negotiate the buy-back argreement with CFE.
2. Use ONLY US or Canadian made components. Chinese makers have been dropping like flies.
3. Forget about adjusting your massive grid to get the last 1/2 hour of sun power. Instead, go on your roof at least once a month and clean the bird droppings and dust from the panels.

Feel free to PM for more info.


Hey David,
In #3, are you referring to the three (3) annual adjustments I describe? If so, the homeowner really does gain at least 40% more power by making the changes every few months, or are you raising a different point?

Your point about cleaning the dust of the panels is also really important for the homeowner to get the expected power.

On the point about the some Chinese panel assembly businesses going out of business: I understand that the panel assemblers do not make the raw crystalline solar panel basic materials. This means that a few companies are making the polysilicon materials, while many assemble the panels. Doesn't this mean that when a solar panel assembler goes out of business, the basic material of the guts of the panel (the polysilicon) are still good quality? Are there reports of the Chinese panels failing early?

We are planning a 4KW system for some apartment units, and your point about assemblers going out of business is possibly troubling, since, we do not want to be stuck with panels that fail early. (saying that we do have "a dog in this hunt")
steve
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Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com


jackak10

Jul 12, 2013, 6:44 AM

Post #13 of 23 (35924 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] solar panels

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Here's a list of bankrupt Chinese solar panel companies:

http://www.greentechmedia.com/...ased-Solar-Companies

Taking into consideration the general quality of Chinese products and the fact that one of the first things a financially strapped company does is start looking for ways to cut costs, your concern about the quality of your panels is justified.


(This post was edited by jackak10 on Jul 12, 2013, 6:46 AM)


YucaLandia


Jul 12, 2013, 7:14 AM

Post #14 of 23 (35905 views)

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Re: [jackak10] solar panels

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THANKS for the list.

Since we are planning a substantial order (40 panels?), I am drilling into the April 2013 list - and finding that some of the companies listed as "out of business" / "Rest in Peace" are US firms (like EPV solar in New Jersey) that voluntarily went into Chapter 11 bankruptcy - to reorganize - with no debts to consumers (only business debts) - and they have come out of bankruptcy - producing panels in China - so "greentech-solar" website needs some updating to better reflect reality.

Evergreen Solar seems to have a similar story - listed as "Rest in Peace" (dead) by greentechsolar in their 2013 report, but Evergreen is back in business, and have also shifted their production to China. ...

Still, a modestly-flawed list, is much better than no list.
Thanks!
steve
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com


DavidHF

Jul 12, 2013, 7:43 AM

Post #15 of 23 (35898 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] solar panels

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Your first line of defense in the event of a system failure is the installer, is that you? If not then choose a reputable one. Your second line of defense is the equipment maker, e.g. panels, inverter. The silicon maker's warranty is to the panel maker, not you. That 25 year panel warranty is NG if the panel maker is OOB. I seriously doubt your claim of 40% increase in power generated when using an adjustable mount. Perhaps in low sun angle climes. Obviously the cost and hassle doesn't justify the return or every provider would offer such an option. Never the less I don't want to debate the point. I have a 2kw system oriented to 20 degrees and couldn't be more pleased with it's performance. I have Sharp thin-film panels (far better than poly in high-heat and semi-cloudy environs) and a Fronius inverter, all made in the USA. My jardinero cleans the panels once per month.





BTW, in order to find reputable panel makers use google and look for info such as financials, history, where made, management team, and other products.


(This post was edited by DavidHF on Jul 12, 2013, 7:48 AM)


YucaLandia


Jul 12, 2013, 7:59 AM

Post #16 of 23 (35889 views)

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Re: [DavidHF] solar panels

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Hi David,
Fortunately, polysilicon is a robust material that works for decades - as long as the initial junctions do not fail - so material failures generally occur only during the initial start-up/installation periods. The junctions may be a different matter (where the cables attach to the panels) - which is why I asked if you or others can list specific instances of failures.

"I have a 2kw system oriented to 20 degrees and couldn't be more pleased with it's performance."
You question the importance of approximately aiming the panels at the average 3 month period's sun position .

What voltages do you see from your panels at the different times of year?
We have seen significant voltage drops (20% - 60%) for 40 southern-aimed panels, when the sun is in the northern sky all day.

Maybe these are just anomalies of our panels, and of friend's systems in California?

Without actual voltage measurements, can any of us say how much power we have gained or lost due to aiming issues?

Pete notes that the salespeople in his area get around this problem by selling the homeowner a system that is much larger than the homeowner's power needs - so when using southern-aimed panels - they get enough power in the summer Air Conditioning and Pool pump season - when the sun is in the northern sky all day.

For folks living at or below the Tropic of Cancer (23.5 Latitude) really do experience a summer sun the stays in the Northern sky pretty much all day - not the proposed 1 hour.
steve
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Jul 12, 2013, 8:01 AM)


DavidHF

Jul 13, 2013, 6:36 AM

Post #17 of 23 (35810 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] solar panels

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I don't understand your last comment about folks living in the Tropic of Cancer. We live at 20.5N Lat.


YucaLandia


Jul 13, 2013, 7:35 AM

Post #18 of 23 (35790 views)

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Re: [DavidHF] solar panels

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Hi David,
Explanation of Why We Should Adjust (Re-Aim) our Solar Panels to Point at the Sun, 3 or 4 Times a Year:
Since you live south of the Tropic of Cancer, "your" sun stays north of vertical through the entire day for at least 2 months per year.

At our latitude in Merida ( 20.58 ) translates to the sun being directly overhead at solar noon at about May 20. That means that the sun spends 100% of its time in the NORTHERN sky, between roughly May 20 and July 20.

This means that your south-pointing panels are pointed away from the sun - ALL hours of the day - for at least 2 months a year, because you live at 20.5, ~ inside the 23.5 Tropic of Cancer ~.

If the astronomy of the earth's 23.5 tilt towards the summer sun, and the logic of living at latitudes less than the Tropic of Cancer (23.5) evades you, consider this diagram:





This diagram gives a picture of how between May 21'st and July 24'th: The Sun stays 100% of the time in
the NORTH of the Summer sky for people living at 20 N (or less).

Hopefully, you can now see why your claim that changing solar panel alignment to supposedly catch ... "just 1 extra hour of sunlight" ... does not fit reality.

Our days at the 20'th parallel also stretch to longer times during this key May 21 - July 24 period: Ranging from 12 hrs 7 minutes, up to 12 hours 18 minutes ( http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/...solcalc/sunrise.html ) - So, we are not talking about gaining your proposed 1 hr of better energy production - we are talking about 60 days x 8hr/day of strong sun = 480 hours of high quality sunlight gains for just those 2 months... And the gains continue for an additional 2 months, until the sun starts rising at more southern points - (think after the Fall equinox through to the Spring Equinox - when solar panels should be aimed at the Southern sky).


The Bottom Line: Aiming solar panels northward during the Mexican summer gains a full 12 hours per day of strong sunshine - at the time of the year when we need the extra energy most: Air Conditioning, fans, and pool-pump season.

Your current southern-aimed panels simply are pointed away from the sun, all day, for roughly 3 months, and your southern-aimed panels are pointed away from the sun most of the day for at least 4 months... - pointed in the wrong direction during the seasons when we use the most electricity...

By aiming panels only south, you have to buy more of CFE's higher rate Intermedio and highest rate Excedente power during your heaviest power usage months.

Fortunately, this stuff is basic geometry that has been well known since Galileo and Copernicus were dodging missives from the Vatican - meaning: It really does work....

You can figure out your typical loss by simply measuring the voltage, around noon, for a southern-aimed, fixed-single-geometry aimed panel on a sunny summer day (like now), and then point the panel directly at the sun and measure the voltage...

Twinkle, Twinkle little star, Power = I squared R.... or I x V...
For fixed resistance, 20% higher voltage = 20% more power... etc

We got 40% voltage variations when I did this with the friend's solar panels. ...

This means that simple 3-time-per-year re-aiming of solar panels, keeps our power bills much lower, especially in the Summer months of high power usage...

Why intentionally pay for extra Intermedio and Excedente high $$ rate electricity, during the Air Conditioning season? **

Hope this helps demystify a little of our wonderful universe,
steve


**Yes, because we are located North of the Equator, the sun spends more hours per day (on average) in the Southern sky than the Northern sky, but why not make some small adjustments 3X or 4X per year to do things well to get even more "free " electricity during the most important months?
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Jul 13, 2013, 10:21 AM)


DavidHF

Jul 13, 2013, 11:10 AM

Post #19 of 23 (35711 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] solar panels

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Yucalandia, I thought I made it clear I don't want to debate re-aiming one's solar array with you. For me it's simply not worth the extra cost and the labor involved. Most here (Chapala) would agree with me. We're old and are not about to be getting up on the roof 3 times a year, if at all. BTW, I made no claim about catching an ''extra hour" of sun. My CFE bill averages about $220 Pesos/billing period year round. I'm happy. BTW, we don't have an "air conditioning season here."


YucaLandia


Jul 13, 2013, 3:17 PM

Post #20 of 23 (35682 views)

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Re: [DavidHF] solar panels

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In Reply To
On Jul 13, 2013, 6:36 AM, DavidHF wrote:
I don't understand your last comment about folks living in the Tropic of Cancer. We live at 20.5N Lat.



Hi David,
Thought this post of yours was a request for explanations of why your living at 20.5 N latitude ( south of the Tropic of Cancer) affects the operation of a solar system. The position of the sun relates to the efficiency of the panels abilities to gather energy, which I mistakenly thought was your area of lack of understanding.

My apologies for misunderstanding your intent.
steve

=====================================

In Reply To
On Jul 12, 2013, 5:48 AM, David HF wrote:
I've owner a PV solar system for almost 3 years.
My suggestions:
1. Use ONLY a reputable installer. Talk to every one of them who works in your area; at a minimum these should included E2Energias and ESun Solar. Unless of course you read Spanish and and can negotiate the buy-back argreement with CFE.
2. Use ONLY US or Canadian made components. Chinese makers have been dropping like flies.
3. Forget about adjusting your massive grid to get the last 1/2 hour of sun power. Instead, go on your roof at least once a month and clean the bird droppings and dust from the panels.

Feel free to PM for more info.


and

In Reply To
On Jul 13, 2013, 11:10 AM , DavidHF wrote:
Yucalandia, I thought I made it clear I don't want to debate re-aiming one's solar array with you. ...
BTW, I made no claim about catching an ''extra hour" of sun. ...




David,
My apologies for misquoting you about adjusting panels to get the ''extra hour" of sun.
You clearly wrote earlier that you were not interested in getting "the last 1/2 hour of sun power "

You are correct, you only wrote about a half hour of sun, not an "extra hour" of sun.
My apologies for misquoting you.


Conclusion: There clearly is a difference between the US solar PV commercial communities installations
and Mexico's more-relaxed but less-efficient approaches,

Fortunately, when buying a service, buyers can choose what type of work, and what system they are willing to pay for,
whether we are NOB and SOB,
steve
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Jul 13, 2013, 3:34 PM)


DavidHF

Jul 13, 2013, 3:37 PM

Post #21 of 23 (35673 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] solar panels

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Just for clarity; I live in Mexico, Pete is my neighbor. Again, we have no ''air conditioning and pool pump season. The average home here can be serviced well by a system costing less than $7,000US and will enjoy very small bills from CFE. Our concern is simply staying out of the DAC Tarifa.


sioux4noff

Jul 13, 2013, 9:47 PM

Post #22 of 23 (35628 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] solar panels

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We live in Nayarit, just north of Puerto Vallarta. With our 12 panels installed by eSun, we paid a total of 450 pesos for an entire year to CFE. There is no way I would want to reaim our panels several times a year.


jbowler

Jul 16, 2013, 8:33 AM

Post #23 of 23 (35530 views)

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Re: [sioux4noff] solar panels

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Thank you to all that have responded to my request for solar panel info. I have now found a reputable American owned company here in Mazatlan called Mazatlan Solar. I very much appreciate all of your knowledgable input!
 
 
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