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YucaLandia


Apr 22, 2012, 11:59 AM

Post #1 of 5 (2903 views)

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Insider's view on FM3 (No Inmigrante) Visas

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While waiting briefly in line for my annual FM2 renewal, I talked with a fellow whose attorney described an interesting view of the FM3 - which might explain a number of the confusing ways that has been applied. The attorney worked for INM for years after he finished law school, and based on his insider's view: He says that the FM3 was not intended for use by Canadian and American retirees.

He says that when NAFTA was kicked-off, the Mexican Inmigraction officials believed that there would be many American professionals coming to Mexico to help set up maquiladores / fabricas near the border. These professionals were expected to come to Mexico for several months at a time - working to set-up the businesses, returning to the US, and then later coming back to help the factories continue to run. INM assumed that these American professionals would come and go, hence needing their cars here for temporary stays - and then driving back across the border.

They assumed that some of the gringos would decide to set up households in Mexico, which explains why you get your FM3 first, and then have 6 months to bring down your stuff - as a professional traveling back and forth. They further assumed that these permits needed to be set up for annual extensions, up to 5 years, while the professionals kept going back and forth between Mexico and the USA. This is also why there were no restrictions on the time allowed outside of Mexico for this special intermediate "resident" visa.

The FM2 was designed for "normal" residents intending to live or stay in Mexico - and hence the restrictions on keeping foreign plated cars and on extended stays outside of Mexico, because the FM2 type of "resident" was expected to make a long term commitment to staying here - which is also why FM2's are set up to expire after 5 years, with NO renewals, but instead you become a naturalized Citizen, an Inmigrado, or you drop back to the FM3 - temporary resident status.

INM did not imagine that so few US professionals would take advantage of the FM3, and they did not imagine that there were lots of US and Canadian snow-birds and retirees who would like to come to Mexico for longer than simple tourist stays.

All of this explains the evolving nature of the FM3 and FM2 - as the INM tried to adapt to how Americans and Canadians were using them - and it explains the future changes to the new "Residente Permanente" and "Residente Temporal" - where these new categories really cannot align in a 1:1 way with the old FM3 and FM2 's , because the old FM3s and FM2s were kluges - initially designed for 2 specific groups of Americans - while the reality turned out very differently.
???
steve
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Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com



tonyburton / Moderator


Apr 22, 2012, 12:24 PM

Post #2 of 5 (2890 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] Insider's view on FM3 (No Inmigrante) Visas

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The attorney must be a young man, then! FM2 and FM3 categories predate NAFTA (and discussion of NAFTA) by a VERY long time.


YucaLandia


Apr 22, 2012, 1:26 PM

Post #3 of 5 (2871 views)

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Re: [tonyburton] Insider's view on FM3 (No Inmigrante) Visas

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In a 3'rd hand story (told by the attorney to his client, related to me, and then skewed by my memory), we can expect some variations. The friend telling the story told it as "When the attorney was young, just out of law school ... "

It's why I ended the first post with... ???
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Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Apr 22, 2012, 1:53 PM)


Sculptari

Apr 22, 2012, 3:44 PM

Post #4 of 5 (2837 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] Insider's view on FM3 (No Inmigrante) Visas

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That's a real interesting revelation Steve. I think this was in anticipation of the maquiladora zones - which was mid 1980's. It has of course died out quite substantially, the biggest problem was attracting mid to upper managers to uproot their families and live on the border. There is a new variation now, of which I don't know all the details, but this type of tax arrangement can now be anywhere in Mexico. A business contact using this (north of Bucerias) reports that everything is simplified - but with every shipment to Canada or the U.S.A., he has to pay his Customs Broker $600 US

Now here is another Mexico 'urban legend' worth noting. In the late 1970s the Mexican tourism body wanted to attract RV travelers to Mexico. The fuel crisis was over, but retired people were still looking for sunny places to live frugally, without wandering all over the place. My understanding is that Lake Chapala was chosen for this anticipated boon in RV living. This may have been the time enrollment in IMSS (catastrophic and emergency only was the intent, and actual law) and the easy import laws for RV's was dangled before this potential market. Well, the market never materialized and upon further research it was discovered that short and medium term RV travelers were not actually dropping a lot of money into the local or national economies.

Now it is quite a comment to national character, if there is such a thing, that there is such a tradition in Mexico of welcoming people's from other countries. It really is quite remarkable. Usually Canada is waved around in this category but in fact they have not allowed a retirement category since 1996, and 80% (and this a pure guess) of Canadians would not qualify to immigrate if they were magically forced to reapply!
no longer active on Mexconnect


playaboy

Apr 24, 2012, 7:03 AM

Post #5 of 5 (2654 views)

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Re: [YucaLandia] Insider's view on FM3 (No Inmigrante) Visas

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FYI, just to add a little.

About 5 years ago my brother worked for a company that had a maquiladora plant outside TJ. He went across the border several times a month to check up on things. He never intended to live there and didn't even spend a night there.

Because he "worked" in Mexico he had to have an FM3. The company took care of that for him so all he had to do was sign paperwork to get it.
 
 
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