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Chuck77

Feb 14, 2012, 6:38 PM

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high altitude sickness

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I will be visiting SMA this week for a stay of about a week.
I have always lived at low altitude and wonder if I should take medication to prevent high altitude sickness as SMA is approximately 6,000 ft. in elevation.
Thank you for your response, Chuck



chicois8

Feb 14, 2012, 6:47 PM

Post #2 of 13 (10563 views)

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Re: [Chuck77] high altitude sickness

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I will be visiting SMA this week for a stay of about a week.
I have always lived at low altitude and wonder if I should take medication to prevent high altitude sickness as SMA is approximately 6,000 ft. in elevation.
Thank you for your response, Chuck


I am in SMA today, I drove in from Puerto Vallarta yesterday, I am feeling no side effects from the altitude, you will love SMA,if your single there are about 8 women to each man.LOL
Rincon de Guayabitos,Nayarit
San Mateo, California


chinagringo


Feb 14, 2012, 6:49 PM

Post #3 of 13 (10562 views)

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Re: [Chuck77] high altitude sickness

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Well Chuck, color me stupid if you wish but I personally have never heard of a pill to combat High altitude sickness. We used to live on the Oregon Coast at sea level and travel to Guadalajara. As far as I know, a few days of acclimatising at higher altitude should work out OK. You may wish to watch your intake of "adult beverages" during that period as they can really sneak up on you when you are not used to the altitude! It does save money, however.
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



chinagringo


Feb 14, 2012, 6:51 PM

Post #4 of 13 (10561 views)

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Re: [chicois8] high altitude sickness

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Yes but have you found a woman to take you to the Rosewood yet?
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



chicois8

Feb 14, 2012, 6:55 PM

Post #5 of 13 (10560 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] high altitude sickness

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Yes but have you found a woman to take you to the Rosewood yet?


Yes 2 rich ones, but there is a much better restaurant on top of the hill that has better food and view, I will find the name but it is Tuscan something...

Neil, having a ball here..........
Rincon de Guayabitos,Nayarit
San Mateo, California

(This post was edited by chicois8 on Feb 14, 2012, 7:04 PM)


Itztlacoliuhqui


Feb 14, 2012, 7:55 PM

Post #6 of 13 (10544 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] high altitude sickness

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Well Chuck, color me stupid if you wish but I personally have never heard of a pill to combat High altitude sickness.


Diamox is the pill prescribed for high altitude sickness.


frito

Feb 27, 2012, 10:59 PM

Post #7 of 13 (10152 views)

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Re: [Chuck77] high altitude sickness

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When I lived in Santa Fe, NM years ago I experienced a bit of queasiness the first few days. Santa Fe is at 7000' and my job was very physical. 6000' and taking it easy at first should be no problem at all. Altitude sickness is much more likely at much higher altitudes, such as La Paz, Bolivia or Quito, Ecuador.


jrpierce


Mar 3, 2012, 3:42 PM

Post #8 of 13 (9957 views)

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Re: [frito] high altitude sickness

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I grew up in Denver, Colorado--the "mile high city." It is, of course, 5,280 ft--lower than San Miguel de Allende. I remember a number of visitors feeling the effects of the altitude. I also remember sports teams and athletes coming to town a couple or more days early so they could acclimate to the altitude.

At these levels, though, I believe a bit of acclimation is all that is needed. Many people don't seem to notice it at all. Serious altitude sickness occurs at much higher elevations. While I'm not an expert, I've never heard of medication for the lower level altitudes.

Jim


chinagringo


Mar 3, 2012, 6:36 PM

Post #9 of 13 (9928 views)

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Re: [jrpierce] high altitude sickness

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Jim:

Way back in the 70's, I was living in Aspen, CO and on many occasions I left my vehicle at the Denver Airport to fly home for the weekend. Back in those days, it was a kick to see passengers who had just flown in from Chicago or wherever load on to a Rocky Mountain twin Otter for a flight to Aspen. They really freaked when the pilots gave instructions on how to use the oxygen masks when flying to Aspen. Then again, the locals in Aspen would grab a R/T flight at a greatly reduced rate to clear a hangover while breathing the oxygen masks!
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



jrpierce


Mar 4, 2012, 7:22 AM

Post #10 of 13 (9892 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] high altitude sickness

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I never heard of that, Neil. I can imagine that would be disconcerting!
Flying thru the Rockies in a twin otter could also be quite a bumpy ride, I bet.

Jim


chinagringo


Mar 4, 2012, 12:00 PM

Post #11 of 13 (9863 views)

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Re: [jrpierce] high altitude sickness

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Only a thrill when the pilot's name tag read: John Wayne!
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



DavidMcL


Mar 4, 2012, 4:34 PM

Post #12 of 13 (9846 views)

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Re: [Chuck77] high altitude sickness

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There are a number of factors which governs one's response to altitude.

The first is genetics and has little to do with one's conditioning. In one situation a high performance athlete could struggle at 5,000 feet whereas an overweight, out-of-condition 60 year old will have no difficulty at 12,000 feet.
The second is the pulmonary health of the individual. For example COPD (Emphysema) directly affects one's ability to function well at altitude.

What is the issue? Simply put, the higher you go, the thinner the air which means that in every breath the % of oxygen becomes less the higher you go. What is called high altitude sickness is actually a simple response to not being able to get enough oxygen exchanged into the blood stream from the available oxygen.

Some people simply can't deal with the reduced oxygen at altitude.

What altitude?

Varies with the individual. However, the airlines have determined that 7,000 to 8,000 feet of altitude is comfortable for most people and that is the altitude to which they pressurize their cabins when flying at real altitude (30 to 37,000 feet). Those that have altitude dyspenea (inability to effectively exchange oxygen at altitude) will finish a 4 hour flight feeling exhausted, somewhat light headed and quite sleepy because they have been at a reduced oxygen intake level for the four hours. Why? because at 7 to 8,000 feet the oxygen is at only 80% that of sea level.

Most folk won't show as strong a reaction if any because they can effectively obtain enough oxygen from that 80%. Those genetically predisposed to altitude dsypenea or have COPD will struggle.

OK. So what can be done.
1. Some folk will obtain a prescription for Diamox. Diamox assists in the release of CO2 from the lungs which enables the uptake of O2. Often used by mountain climbers before an ascent to assist in their normalizing to altitude. Taken for 3 or 4 days before altitude is reached.

2. Some folk use chlorophyll to assist in the production of red blood cells (the oxygen carriers). More red blood cells, = more capacity for oxygen uptake. Difficulty = blood that becomes thicker due to the abundance of red blood cells. Thus common sense and self monitoring applies if that is a situation of concern to the individual.

3. There are other non-allotropic teas and herbal blends that will assist - beyond my knowledge base.

4. There are other allotropic medications which can assist with actually being at altitude but this is also beyond my knowledge base.


Hope this helps someone!

David

Oh yes. Why do I know this? Because I spent 15 years in Lake Chapala living at 5,000 feet when I should have been living at or below 2,000 feet. - Explains a lot of stupid decisions I made over those 15 years! :) But I wouldn't trade one of those years!
D.
David McL
WebJefe


chinagringo


Mar 4, 2012, 6:26 PM

Post #13 of 13 (9823 views)

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Re: [DavidMcL] high altitude sickness

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David:

Very interesting and informative post on the effects of altitude! Going back 30+ years, I lived in Aspen, CO at an elevation of approximately 8200 feet. I lived a very active lifestyle skiing Aspen Mountain (approx 11,000 feet) most days during the winter and played tennis or golf in the summer. The company that I worked for at the time sponsored Mt Rainer climbs and I experienced breathing issues at Camp Muir at approximately 10,000 feet. Never could figure out why other than to have a belief that somehow there was a lower oxygen content on Mount Rainer due to its proximity to the Pacific Ocean. Certainly not a scientific theory but I had to blame it on something.
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM

 
 
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