Mexico Connect
Forums  > Specific Focus > Mexican Kitchen


cbviajero

Nov 25, 2011, 12:39 PM

Post #1 of 4 (4815 views)

Shortcut

langostinos

Can't Post | Private Reply
I saw some langostinos at the tianguis today so I bought a kilo,any ideas on how to prepare them?I know I can google it but I thought I would check here too.
Chris



Anonimo

Nov 26, 2011, 4:36 AM

Post #2 of 4 (4783 views)

Shortcut

Re: [cbviajero] langostinos

Can't Post | Private Reply
Over the years, I've eaten them twice, once in El Danubio in Mexico City, and more recently, at Mariscos La Güera in Pátzcuaro. Both times they were prepared al mojo de ajo. Other than that, I can't say how to prepare them, but I suspect that simplest is best, as the taste is sweet but subtle.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


cbviajero

Nov 26, 2011, 7:44 AM

Post #3 of 4 (4766 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Anonimo] langostinos

Can't Post | Private Reply
Thanks Anonimo al mojo de ajo sounds good.
Chris


robt65

Nov 27, 2011, 6:09 AM

Post #4 of 4 (4728 views)

Shortcut

Re: [cbviajero] langostinos

Can't Post | Private Reply
OK, you all piqued my interests a I had not heard of this "langostinos" before so I went to look it up at "Wickipedia". I am sure that I am not alone on not knowing about langostino, so I thought I would add it here. I remember one time I asked my (Mexican) wife to go ahead and order for me as we usually like many of the same things. When I came back she had this large bowl of what appeared to be some sort of soup and she was sucking out the meat from what appeared to be what I thought to be a crayfish. As soon as I smelled the very pungent order of some sort of fish I passed and traded her mom for her shrimp on rice. I never knew the name of her “delicacy” so I thought this might be it. I will have to ask her when she wakes up. Now I am more confused than ever as to exactly what she was eating! (smiling)

Langostino
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Langostino is a Spanish word with different meanings in different areas. In America, it is commonly used in the restaurant trade to refer to the meat of the squat lobster, which is neither a true lobster nor a prawn. It is more closely related to porcelain crabs and hermit crabs. Crustaceans labeled as langostino are no more than 3 inches (7.6 cm) long, and weigh no more than 7 ounces (200 g).[1] Langostinos are not langoustes (spiny lobsters) despite a similar name (in Spanish, lobster is called langosta). Also, langostinos are sometimes confused with langoustines (Norway lobster), which is a true lobster common in European cuisine.

In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration allows "langostino" as a market name for three species in the family Galatheidae: Cervimunida johni, Munida gregaria, and Pleuroncodes monodon.[3] In Spain, it means some species of prawns. In Cuba and other Spanish-speaking Caribbean islands, the name langostino is also used to refer to crayfish. In South America, the name langostino is used to refer to red shrimp, Pleoticus muelleri.

Controversy
In March 2006, Long John Silver's garnered controversy by offering buttered lobster bites advertising that they include "langostino lobster".[4] A Los Angeles Superior Court judge made no decisions in April 2006 on the matter when a class-action lawsuit was brought against Rubio's Restaurants, Inc., for selling "lobster burrito" and "lobster taco" that were in fact made with squat lobster.

Robt65
 
 
Search for (advanced search) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.4