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ericbrittan

Oct 17, 2011, 8:18 AM

Post #1 of 10 (4198 views)

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importing a 10 year old car

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I know the info on bringing in Mex. a US or Canadian plated car for six months on a tourist visa or the new FM3 visa is somewhat unclear at the moment. I mean leaving the vehicle in Mex. as apposed to driving it out after 6 months and getting your deposit back.

I am looking at using a customs broker in Laredo to import my Chevy Tracker ( 10 years old). The estimate is around 1000.00 to import and get Mex. plates for the truck and be able to leave it. I have been told you can have it done from Mex. as well but then you will loose your 400.00 deposit you gave to drive it in and also pay the brokerage fee to nationalize it.

The broker tells me I need to send the ownership ( title ) and the ID from a Mex. national who has agreed to have the registration in their name and the paperwork will get done in the states before I cross over the border. I will then have to have the new FM3 visa and clear the paper work for the importation of the vehicle with the Aduana.

I also understand that the vehicle can also be sold at some point after this process.

I have a Mexican plated vehicle in Mex. now but I wish to sell it and have the Tracker there instead.

Anyone care to comment on this or perhaps someone has done this already.

EB.



jerezano

Oct 18, 2011, 1:49 PM

Post #2 of 10 (4123 views)

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Re: [ericbrittan] importing a 10 year old car

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Hello ericbittan,

Suggestion only. Forget the whole idea. If you insist on a "Tracker", then look for a Mexican Plated used tracker, or even God Forbid, buy one new. In the long run it should prove less costly as well as a lot less paper work.

This thought from a guy who has been here in Mexico for 23 years now and has had both Mexican-plated cars and Texas-plated cars, including one converted under the last amnesty program to a nationalized vehicle. This proved rather costly having had a State or municipality "mordida" applied that was a couple of thousand pesos more than the government imposed fees.

Good luck, whatever you do. As ever jerezano


Rolly


Oct 18, 2011, 1:55 PM

Post #3 of 10 (4123 views)

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Re: [jerezano] importing a 10 year old car

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You need to understand that when you nationalize a vehicle, all you get is a Mexican title.
You still have to apply (pay) locally for plates, and pay what ever other local or state fees are imposed.

Rolly Pirate


joaquinx


Oct 18, 2011, 3:23 PM

Post #4 of 10 (4110 views)

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Re: [jerezano] importing a 10 year old car

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One never thinks of replacement/spare parts as the American Tracker is different from the Mexican tracker. Small parts that don't cost much until you try to import them all the way from the US via FedEx while your vehicle sits on blocks.
_______
My desire to be well-informed is currently at odds with my desire to remain sane.

(This post was edited by joaquinx on Oct 18, 2011, 3:23 PM)


Rolly


Oct 18, 2011, 4:19 PM

Post #5 of 10 (4092 views)

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Re: [joaquinx] importing a 10 year old car

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My USA-bought Dodge Ram was built in México, but many parts are unique on this export model and have to be ordered from the USA. My pickup looks identical to the Mexican version until you look under the hood -- big differences there. Even the breaks are different.

Rolly Pirate


chinagringo


Oct 18, 2011, 5:16 PM

Post #6 of 10 (4077 views)

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Re: [Rolly] importing a 10 year old car

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So there are Mexican breaks and NOB type breaks? Must be related to topes?
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



joaquinx


Oct 18, 2011, 5:39 PM

Post #7 of 10 (4069 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] importing a 10 year old car

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In Reply To
So there are Mexican breaks and NOB type breaks? Must be related to topes?


This is true. If you don't brake in time, your car will break.
_______
My desire to be well-informed is currently at odds with my desire to remain sane.


chinagringo


Oct 18, 2011, 5:47 PM

Post #8 of 10 (4065 views)

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Re: [joaquinx] importing a 10 year old car

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Sorry, I just couldn't resist!

Just a personal opinion but I cannot imagine why someone would even think about a Tracker!
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



morgaine7


Oct 18, 2011, 6:34 PM

Post #9 of 10 (4049 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] importing a 10 year old car

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Quote
Just a personal opinion but I cannot imagine why someone would even think about a Tracker!

I have one of the Tracker's predecessors, a 1987 Suzuki Samurai, and it's a perfect vehicle for Mexico unless you do a lot of highway driving. Economical, easy to repair, easy to park, goes anywhere, clears the topes and flooded arroyos, great for hauling stuff. A previous owner had already imported it, though.

Kate


mazbook1


Oct 18, 2011, 6:35 PM

Post #10 of 10 (4049 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] importing a 10 year old car

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chinagringo, I bought my "American" Tracker in Albuquerque in very early 2003, and it has probably proven to be the absolute best new car I've ever purchased. Ideal (and small enough without being just too darn small) for use in México, and mine is only the 4 cylinder, two-wheel drive, el cheapo SUV version (not that rather odd, 2 seater version with a canvas covered back luggage section). It's very comfortable for 5 adults, and when my kids were small we could put 5 adults + 2 little kids (back in the package section) in it. I have highly recommended it to many as a small, inexpensive SUV for bringing to México, and they have had just as good a luck as I have. With GM selling their interest in Suzuki Motors, though, I'm not sure just how much longer it will be sold as a Chevrolet Tracker.

And joaquinx, in the 8 years I've had my "American" Tracker, I have yet to find ANY part not easily and promptly available (at normal Mexican prices) at the local Chevrolet dealer here.

The reason I put "American" in quotes is that the Chevrolet Tracker, whether sold in the U.S., México or Canada, is actually made in Canada on the same assembly lines that Suzuki's own comparable model is made, but since it has more than 50% NAFTA country content is considered a NAFTA automobile.
 
 
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