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robt65

Jul 12, 2011, 12:29 PM

Post #1 of 9 (4668 views)

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A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Does anyone have a good thick (about the consistency of a good thick southern morning sausage gravy) white sauce using only common Mexican ingredients, which can be used for tuna or salmon.

Can a person find these common Mexican ingredients for example at a commercial Mexicana or Soriana market? I sure would like such a recipe.

If not does anyone have a good recipe for a good thick consistency southern U.S. states morning gravy (as in biscuits and gravy) without the use of seasoned sausage that would turn or obliterate the taste of a fine tuna or salmon steak.

The exact recipe and product brand product names would be appreciated.

Thanks,

robt65


(This post was edited by robt65 on Jul 12, 2011, 1:35 PM)



Bennie García

Jul 12, 2011, 1:05 PM

Post #2 of 9 (4662 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Make your basic bechamel and add some fish or seafood stock.


robt65

Jul 12, 2011, 1:33 PM

Post #3 of 9 (4657 views)

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Re: [Bennie García] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Sorry Bennie,

I should have said . . . . . I am not familiar with bechamel (the old standard French cornerstone white sauce) used in Mexican cooking . . . . can you tell me the specific recipe for that, and what the specific brand name ingredients would be?
Does that "bechamel" have a nice thick consistency to it as in the old standard French white sauce?
I really am not familiar with much Mexican cooking at all and I don’t know if they have their own variation of a White sauce.
My wife is very familiar with Mexican cooking and is a pretty darned good cook, but I want to make this on my own and surprise her. Can I buy all the ingredients at the local Mexican súper mercados?

Thanks,

robt65


(This post was edited by robt65 on Jul 12, 2011, 1:55 PM)


Rolly


Jul 12, 2011, 1:39 PM

Post #4 of 9 (4650 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Several recipes here:

Personally, I think it is a crime to put a sauce on salmon. Maybe a dill butter.
I like my tuna raw -- sushi.

Rolly Pirate


robt65

Jul 12, 2011, 2:05 PM

Post #5 of 9 (4640 views)

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Re: [Rolly] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Hi Rolly,

Thanks for the tips. I like dill a lot, but my wife isn't all that fussy about it. As far as eating raw fish of any kind, . . . . . . had my fill of that when in Japan for some time. I didn't like it then and sure don't like it now! (smiling) The closest I come to eating raw fish anymore, is a good thin sliced lox (I know it is cooked) and / or sardines in spring water on dry toast.

I really appreciate the site you sent . . . . . . . there appears to be some really interesting variations on there, I am going to have to try some of them.

What is the best "heavy cream" available here? Would that be Lala? . . . . . . . . . . . . and what would be the equivalent of a "heavy cream" here in Mexico?

robt65


bournemouth

Jul 12, 2011, 2:10 PM

Post #6 of 9 (4635 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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I thikn Lyncott's Crema para Batir will work for you.


Bennie García

Jul 12, 2011, 4:05 PM

Post #7 of 9 (4627 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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In Reply To
Sorry Bennie,

I should have said . . . . . I am not familiar with bechamel (the old standard French cornerstone white sauce) used in Mexican cooking . . . . can you tell me the specific recipe for that, and what the specific brand name ingredients would be?
Does that "bechamel" have a nice thick consistency to it as in the old standard French white sauce?
I really am not familiar with much Mexican cooking at all and I don’t know if they have their own variation of a White sauce.
My wife is very familiar with Mexican cooking and is a pretty darned good cook, but I want to make this on my own and surprise her. Can I buy all the ingredients at the local Mexican súper mercados?

Thanks,

robt65


Dude, "Mexican" cooking incorporates many techniques and ingredients from other cuisines. The ingredients for a bechamel will probably be found in your own larder. There is no need for any brand name products.

Make a bechamel, add some fish stock and infuse it with a small amount of the chile of your choice or blend some cilantro and add it to the sauce. In fact I think a nice cilantro sauce would be a great way to serve salmon instead of the more common dill. A Mexican touch.


Anonimo

Jul 13, 2011, 10:49 AM

Post #8 of 9 (4583 views)

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Re: [Bennie García] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Years ago, I had a great filete de pescado in a cilantro bechamel based sauce.I t was in the Restaurante Los Delfines in the Hotel Las Brisas (now the Hotel Garza Canela), in San Blas, Nayarit.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


Maesonna

Jul 14, 2011, 1:33 PM

Post #9 of 9 (4539 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Bechamel will give a very different taste and texture than cream, though either one should be good in their own way.

To make a bechamel, melt 2 tablespoons (30 mL) butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add 2 tablespoons flour, and cook, stirring constantly for a couple of minutes. (This cooks the natural starches present in the flour so that the finished sauce won't have a raw-flour taste. You don't want to cook it so long that it turns brown.) Remove from heat momentarily and pour in 1 measuring cup (250 mL) of milk. Return to heat and stir constantly until it comes to a boil. This is best done with a wire whisk. The flour-butter mixture should dissolve as you stir, and by the time the sauce reaches a boil (at which point it will thicken) it should all be smooth. (If it's lumpy, you can cheat by giving the whole thing a buzz in the blender and returning it to the saucepan.)

Salt to taste, and add any herbs or other flavourings you might want. If you want a touch of onion, put in a bit of finely-chopped onion at the beginning with the butter so that the onion can cook a bit.

You can vary the texture by using more flour (thicker sauce) or less flour (thinner sauce), in a range of about 1 to 3 tablespoons.
 
 
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