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robt65

Jul 12, 2011, 12:29 PM

Post #1 of 9 (5062 views)

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A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Does anyone have a good thick (about the consistency of a good thick southern morning sausage gravy) white sauce using only common Mexican ingredients, which can be used for tuna or salmon.

Can a person find these common Mexican ingredients for example at a commercial Mexicana or Soriana market? I sure would like such a recipe.

If not does anyone have a good recipe for a good thick consistency southern U.S. states morning gravy (as in biscuits and gravy) without the use of seasoned sausage that would turn or obliterate the taste of a fine tuna or salmon steak.

The exact recipe and product brand product names would be appreciated.

Thanks,

robt65


(This post was edited by robt65 on Jul 12, 2011, 1:35 PM)



Bennie García

Jul 12, 2011, 1:05 PM

Post #2 of 9 (5056 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Make your basic bechamel and add some fish or seafood stock.


robt65

Jul 12, 2011, 1:33 PM

Post #3 of 9 (5051 views)

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Re: [Bennie García] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Sorry Bennie,

I should have said . . . . . I am not familiar with bechamel (the old standard French cornerstone white sauce) used in Mexican cooking . . . . can you tell me the specific recipe for that, and what the specific brand name ingredients would be?
Does that "bechamel" have a nice thick consistency to it as in the old standard French white sauce?
I really am not familiar with much Mexican cooking at all and I don’t know if they have their own variation of a White sauce.
My wife is very familiar with Mexican cooking and is a pretty darned good cook, but I want to make this on my own and surprise her. Can I buy all the ingredients at the local Mexican súper mercados?

Thanks,

robt65


(This post was edited by robt65 on Jul 12, 2011, 1:55 PM)


Rolly


Jul 12, 2011, 1:39 PM

Post #4 of 9 (5044 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Several recipes here:

Personally, I think it is a crime to put a sauce on salmon. Maybe a dill butter.
I like my tuna raw -- sushi.

Rolly Pirate


robt65

Jul 12, 2011, 2:05 PM

Post #5 of 9 (5034 views)

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Re: [Rolly] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Hi Rolly,

Thanks for the tips. I like dill a lot, but my wife isn't all that fussy about it. As far as eating raw fish of any kind, . . . . . . had my fill of that when in Japan for some time. I didn't like it then and sure don't like it now! (smiling) The closest I come to eating raw fish anymore, is a good thin sliced lox (I know it is cooked) and / or sardines in spring water on dry toast.

I really appreciate the site you sent . . . . . . . there appears to be some really interesting variations on there, I am going to have to try some of them.

What is the best "heavy cream" available here? Would that be Lala? . . . . . . . . . . . . and what would be the equivalent of a "heavy cream" here in Mexico?

robt65


bournemouth

Jul 12, 2011, 2:10 PM

Post #6 of 9 (5029 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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I thikn Lyncott's Crema para Batir will work for you.


Bennie García

Jul 12, 2011, 4:05 PM

Post #7 of 9 (5021 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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In Reply To
Sorry Bennie,

I should have said . . . . . I am not familiar with bechamel (the old standard French cornerstone white sauce) used in Mexican cooking . . . . can you tell me the specific recipe for that, and what the specific brand name ingredients would be?
Does that "bechamel" have a nice thick consistency to it as in the old standard French white sauce?
I really am not familiar with much Mexican cooking at all and I don’t know if they have their own variation of a White sauce.
My wife is very familiar with Mexican cooking and is a pretty darned good cook, but I want to make this on my own and surprise her. Can I buy all the ingredients at the local Mexican súper mercados?

Thanks,

robt65


Dude, "Mexican" cooking incorporates many techniques and ingredients from other cuisines. The ingredients for a bechamel will probably be found in your own larder. There is no need for any brand name products.

Make a bechamel, add some fish stock and infuse it with a small amount of the chile of your choice or blend some cilantro and add it to the sauce. In fact I think a nice cilantro sauce would be a great way to serve salmon instead of the more common dill. A Mexican touch.


Anonimo

Jul 13, 2011, 10:49 AM

Post #8 of 9 (4977 views)

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Re: [Bennie García] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Years ago, I had a great filete de pescado in a cilantro bechamel based sauce.I t was in the Restaurante Los Delfines in the Hotel Las Brisas (now the Hotel Garza Canela), in San Blas, Nayarit.



Saludos,
Anonimo


Maesonna

Jul 14, 2011, 1:33 PM

Post #9 of 9 (4933 views)

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Re: [robt65] A Good Thick White Sauce for Tuna or Salmon.

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Bechamel will give a very different taste and texture than cream, though either one should be good in their own way.

To make a bechamel, melt 2 tablespoons (30 mL) butter in a saucepan over medium heat. Add 2 tablespoons flour, and cook, stirring constantly for a couple of minutes. (This cooks the natural starches present in the flour so that the finished sauce won't have a raw-flour taste. You don't want to cook it so long that it turns brown.) Remove from heat momentarily and pour in 1 measuring cup (250 mL) of milk. Return to heat and stir constantly until it comes to a boil. This is best done with a wire whisk. The flour-butter mixture should dissolve as you stir, and by the time the sauce reaches a boil (at which point it will thicken) it should all be smooth. (If it's lumpy, you can cheat by giving the whole thing a buzz in the blender and returning it to the saucepan.)

Salt to taste, and add any herbs or other flavourings you might want. If you want a touch of onion, put in a bit of finely-chopped onion at the beginning with the butter so that the onion can cook a bit.

You can vary the texture by using more flour (thicker sauce) or less flour (thinner sauce), in a range of about 1 to 3 tablespoons.
 
 
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