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robt65

Jun 23, 2011, 6:46 AM

Post #1 of 30 (8531 views)

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on Being Sneaky

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Good Morning all,

I am trying to teach an 8 year old the meaning of being "sneaky" or "sneaking around". I have looked high and low for a reasonable equivalent in Spanish and have drawn a blank. Does anyone know if there is such a term, or the equivalent in Spanish, of either "being sneaky" or acting in such a manner?

Thanks,
robt65



norteño

Jun 23, 2011, 6:55 AM

Post #2 of 30 (8523 views)

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Re: [robt65] on Being Sneaky

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"Furtivo", "subrepticio", "disimulado" and "engañoso" together give an approximation of "sneaky".


(This post was edited by norteño on Jun 23, 2011, 7:01 AM)


robt65

Jun 23, 2011, 7:24 AM

Post #3 of 30 (8501 views)

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Re: [norteño] on Being Sneaky

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Thanks Norteno,

Is there a more correct way or context (using one of the choices you have sent to me, more than another) to say for example . . . . . "you are being sneaky and that is not a good character to have" . . . . . . . or "you have done something that is very sneaky and that is not acceptable"

Would one of your choices be a better or more correct usage than another . . . or do they all mean about the same thing. I am trying to teach a little 8 year old girl and I don't want to scare her or scar her for life, just something in the way of an attitude adjustment. What would you say or how would you say it?

Robt65



(This post was edited by robt65 on Jun 23, 2011, 7:26 AM)


norteño

Jun 23, 2011, 7:59 AM

Post #4 of 30 (8491 views)

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Re: [robt65] on Being Sneaky

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In Reply To
Thanks Norteno,

Is there a more correct way or context (using one of the choices you have sent to me, more than another) to say for example . . . . . "you are being sneaky and that is not a good character to have" . . . . . . . or "you have done something that is very sneaky and that is not acceptable"

Would one of your choices be a better or more correct usage than another . . . or do they all mean about the same thing. I am trying to teach a little 8 year old girl and I don't want to scare her or scar her for life, just something in the way of an attitude adjustment. What would you say or how would you say it?

Robt65

I am sure a native speaker will be along soon with just the right term to use with a child.


eyePad

Jun 23, 2011, 8:02 AM

Post #5 of 30 (8490 views)

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Re: [robt65] on Being Sneaky

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Thanks for providing context.
Those mean two different things in English (I think).
My translation to Mexican Spanish,
sneaky == tramposo (very common word),
sneaking around == moverse furtivamente

r65 you are a wimp, a good mexican mama would leave scars :)

Hicisite algo muy tramposo y no es aceptable. Quiero que seas una persona honesta, etc etc

Awaiting corrections


(This post was edited by eyePad on Jun 23, 2011, 8:08 AM)


robt65

Jun 23, 2011, 8:47 AM

Post #6 of 30 (8469 views)

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Re: [norteño] on Being Sneaky

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Thanks norteno.

You seem to have a pretty good command of the language. in time, I hope to improve. I do apprciate your answer.

Thanks Again,

robt65


robt65

Jun 23, 2011, 9:03 AM

Post #7 of 30 (8461 views)

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Re: [eyePad] on Being Sneaky

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eyePad,

I believe in English they are mostly, if not, all the same definition. One is a verb (doing or in progress of doing (action)) such as to sneak up on someone or sneaking around, and the other (sneak), a noun. However both are the same meaning. I may be a “wimp” in your, or others eyes, which doesn't really concern me a lot . . . . . . as for me, I would rather take some quite time, not so far removed from the action to be corrected and try speaking to the child, rather than "leaving scars" by either of us (myself or my wife) if it should occur a second time, then a time out or a removal of a privilege is issued for a certain period of time. If the habit continues, then for me, that is what the good Lord made the hand to fit the shape of a bottom for (a spanking), I have yet to have to spank our older (8 yrs) daughter and I am grateful for that.

robt65


(This post was edited by robt65 on Jun 23, 2011, 9:31 AM)


panama john

Jun 23, 2011, 2:27 PM

Post #8 of 30 (8414 views)

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Re: [robt65] on Being Sneaky

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Nina no sea tramposa! No le sirve y se hace mucho mas dificil confiarle.


robt65

Jun 24, 2011, 6:11 AM

Post #9 of 30 (8344 views)

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Re: [panama john] on Being Sneaky

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Thanks John,

I don't really understand the first one, as it seems like it is opposit to what I am looking for, when it is Google Translated . . . . then again, we know that Google Translate sure isn't pefect.

I appreciate the feedback.

robt65


La Isla


Jun 24, 2011, 8:43 AM

Post #10 of 30 (8321 views)

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Re: [robt65] on Being Sneaky

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Robt65, you really must wean yourself from Google Translate. Instead, I recommend using a reputable online bilingual dictionary like this one: http://dictionary.reverso.net/. It may take a few seconds more to get a translation, but it is guaranteed to be accurate!


(This post was edited by Rolly on Jun 24, 2011, 8:45 AM)


Rolly


Jun 24, 2011, 9:09 AM

Post #11 of 30 (8313 views)

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Re: [La Isla] on Being Sneaky

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Be aware that this dictionary is European Spanish and English.
For example, it translates mijo as millet.
Otherwise, it has some nice features.

Rolly Pirate


La Isla


Jun 24, 2011, 9:35 AM

Post #12 of 30 (8301 views)

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Re: [Rolly] on Being Sneaky

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Be aware that this dictionary is European Spanish and English.
For example, it translates mijo as millet.
Otherwise, it has some nice features.


It usually indicates if the Spanish word in question is Peninsular or Latin American, or if the English is British or American. It also does a good job of differentiating between different varieties of Latin American Spanish.


Bennie García

Jun 24, 2011, 9:38 AM

Post #13 of 30 (8300 views)

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Re: [Rolly] on Being Sneaky

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Be aware that this dictionary is European Spanish and English.
For example, it translates mijo as millet.
Otherwise, it has some nice features.


I think you are referring to mi hijo sometimes pronounced as 1 word with 2 syllables like mijo. It wouldn't be found in a dictionary spelled as such.


tashby


Jun 24, 2011, 10:58 AM

Post #14 of 30 (8287 views)

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Re: [La Isla] on Being Sneaky

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Speaking of on-line tools, I've been using this one lately. I don't know how it compares with all the others, but it's definitely better than some I've seen.

http://www.spanishdict.com/


Rolly


Jun 24, 2011, 11:29 AM

Post #15 of 30 (8282 views)

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Re: [tashby] on Being Sneaky

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http://www.spanishdict.com/ seems to be more attuned the Mexican Spanish.

Rolly Pirate


Bennie García

Jun 24, 2011, 12:10 PM

Post #16 of 30 (8273 views)

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Re: [Rolly] on Being Sneaky

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I wonder if your site will claim that on and sta(s) are also real words?

¿On stas, mijo?


robt65

Jun 24, 2011, 2:07 PM

Post #17 of 30 (8254 views)

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Re: [robt65] on Being Sneaky

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All I have to say is this is a "pretty sneaky" way to hijack an origina question into a post about dictionary's! (smiling)
I'm sure happy that I recieved a Spanish speaking Mexican and his Gringo friend for the correct answer! Hijack on! (smiling
robt65


mazbook1


Jun 24, 2011, 3:51 PM

Post #18 of 30 (8245 views)

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Re: [La Isla] on Being Sneaky

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And my favorite for quick lookups is http://forum.wordreference.com/forumdisplay.php?f=83 where there are usually translations from multiple dictionaries and is pretty good about attributing the translations (to Spanish) to whatever country or area they are used. They also give you the option of checking the Google translation AND viewing any forum thread that has that particular word in the Subject.

But when I really want to know what a Spanish word means, I always go directly to Diccionario de la lengua española .


La Isla


Jun 24, 2011, 4:32 PM

Post #19 of 30 (8238 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] on Being Sneaky

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In Reply To
And my favorite for quick lookups is http://forum.wordreference.com/forumdisplay.php?f=83 where there are usually translations from multiple dictionaries and is pretty good about attributing the translations (to Spanish) to whatever country or area they are used. They also give you the option of checking the Google translation AND viewing any forum thread that has that particular word in the Subject.

But when I really want to know what a Spanish word means, I always go directly to Diccionario de la lengua española .


In addition to the dictionary I mentioned previously (which is also good for teaching English), I also use wordreference.com. I especially like the forums where members can post translation questions which don't have an easy answer. Generally, other posters chime in with all sorts of suggestions, which can be very helpful when I'm working on a translation job. The dictionary of the RAE is, of course, just about the best if you want definitions in Spanish though you can't always count on it for explanations of words and phrases that are peculiar to Mexico.


Rolly


Jun 24, 2011, 4:59 PM

Post #20 of 30 (8234 views)

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Re: [Bennie García] on Being Sneaky

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¿On stas, mijo? ¿Donde estas, mijo? Not in the dictionary, but I have several walking, talking, breathing translators.

Rolly Pirate


Bennie García

Jun 24, 2011, 5:37 PM

Post #21 of 30 (8229 views)

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Re: [Rolly] on Being Sneaky

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¿On stas, mijo? ¿Donde estas, mijo? Not in the dictionary, but I have several walking, talking, breathing translators.


¿Donde estas? mi hijo


mazbook1


Jun 24, 2011, 5:57 PM

Post #22 of 30 (8221 views)

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Re: [La Isla] on Being Sneaky

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I too use the WordReference forums when I need the answer to some particularly sticky question, but lately have discovered that I can usually get the answer quicker through a Google search specifying only Spanish language sites. This method is particularly good for those tricky México-only words.

(This post was edited by mazbook1 on Jun 24, 2011, 5:59 PM)


La Isla


Jun 24, 2011, 6:15 PM

Post #23 of 30 (8212 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] on Being Sneaky

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Oh, really? I just used Google Translate to translate, "¿Qué onda, mano?" and the answer was "That wave your hand?"


mazbook1


Jun 24, 2011, 6:43 PM

Post #24 of 30 (8207 views)

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Re: [La Isla] on Being Sneaky

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DEFINITELY NOT GOOGLE TRANSLATE! Just a simple Google search for the word or phrase with your "preferences" set to Spanish or Spanish and English. I've had quite good luck with that, although single words work better than phrases.


La Isla


Jun 24, 2011, 6:51 PM

Post #25 of 30 (8204 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] on Being Sneaky

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Yes, it was. This is what I used to get that so-called translation: http://translate.google.com/

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