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robt65

Jun 11, 2011, 7:41 PM

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Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Does anyone have a link or links, or photos of Traditinal Mexican Kitchens you would share. Even some photos of your own Mexican kitchens or other Traditional Mexican kitchens. I have heard that some mexican homes even still have a wood fired oven inside the home, photos of these would also be appreciated.

Thanks,
robt65



Anonimo

Jun 12, 2011, 1:35 AM

Post #2 of 15 (26887 views)

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Re: [robt65] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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http://tinyurl.com/5s37h3v

And, from a more personal standpoint: https://picasaweb.google.com/...911/ElTejabanDeMaria



Saludos,
Anonimo


Kimpatsu Hekigan


Jun 12, 2011, 4:04 AM

Post #3 of 15 (26879 views)

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Re: [robt65] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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I've always thought this burner top arrangement to be intriguing. Regretfully, I no longer have the attribution.

HTH,

-- K.H.




The Disciple lamented, "Master! Why is my life beset with problems?!"
The Master observed, "Only tourists step in dog droppings..."




robt65

Jun 12, 2011, 5:23 AM

Post #4 of 15 (26873 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Hi Anonimo,

Those really are some very older traditional Mexican kitchen photos, and interesting for sure. I think I remember one time, quite some time back, you were showing some photos of your home, to a poster. In those photos, if I remember correctly, you had some shots of your dining area and kitchen. I remember thinking that you certainly had your little slice of heaven all cut out. Single story, kind of a ranch type home as I remember it and in a very beautiful setting. Am I remembering correctly? Could you post some of those photos again, if I am remembering correctly?

Thanks Anonimo,

robt65


robt65

Jun 12, 2011, 5:26 AM

Post #5 of 15 (26871 views)

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Re: [Kimpatsu Hekigan] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Thanks for the post K.H.

It is diferent for sure. Is that a a rounded wall into a ceiling I see?

robt65


sparks


Jun 12, 2011, 6:49 AM

Post #6 of 15 (26854 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Maybe should have read "Fancy Traditional Mexican Kitchens" ... the kind that make Sunset magazine now and then

Actually like Anon's second link but not an easy kitchen to use unless you were raised in it

Sparks Mexico Blog - Sparks Costalegre


esperanza

Jun 12, 2011, 6:50 AM

Post #7 of 15 (26854 views)

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Re: [robt65] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Robt65, Google "traditional mexican kitchen images". That will bring up several pages of photographs, rather than text links.

The image posted by K.H. is one of the truly typical kitchens of old-time Mexico. Most of the images that you'll get from Google are new construction that are wannabe traditional, or foreigners' ideas of traditional. There is a photo (page 2 of the Google images) from Mexico Cooks! on Google that I took at Casa Zuno in Guadalajara; that kitchen dates from the 1920s-30s, when Casa Zuno was built.

In years gone by, all cooking in indoor Mexican kitchens was done over firewood. If you look again at the photo that K.H. posted, notice the black squares on the inside walls of the stove, under the pots. Those are the holes where the leña (sticks of firewood) go. K.H.'s photo does not show the fogón (a separate heat source usually built into a corner) for a clay comal, or griddle, which was used for toasting chiles, baking tortillas, and many other functions.

In addition to the indoor stove, which sometimes was in a separate building away from the house to avoid heating up the house during cooking, homes also had outdoor beehive ovens for baking bread and preparing long-cooked dishes like tatemada.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









robt65

Jun 12, 2011, 7:45 AM

Post #8 of 15 (26842 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Thanks Esperanza,

For the information . . . . . . . once again, I should have been a little more specific about my original questions. In remodeling our home that we bought, I am doubling the size of the kitchen. Since the current kitchen (among several other spaces) has a Bóveda ceiling, in order to expand (more than double) the current space, I am going to have to have a pretty "hefty" brick or stone arch in between the existing and new expansion. I am looking for ways to possibly incorporate an indoor / outdoor oven (similar to the beehive) you talked about, if it would be at all practical to do so. I have seen one somewhere, that had the actual firebox on the exterior but the cooking (opening) on the interior of the house. Am I dreaming, or is there such a design? Is it practical, or is there too much heat from the interior part of the oven, that would get into the house in the warmer months? I am also looking at incorporating that "wannabe traditional" in some respects, but also including some of the actual older concepts, especially in the areas of kitchen cabinetry and sink prep areas. While I like the idea of ceramic tile and the color schemes they afford, they also present (in the actual older traditional designs that I have seen), what appears to be only smaller 4" X 4" tiles and that sets up a really difficult "cleaning surface". I really want to avoid bacteria breeding areas that can set themselves up for such accumulation of bacteria in the prepping of fish, fowl and meats among other foods. Any suggestions?

I am also really interested in the older "hacienda style" or “Mexican Rustic” style, for lack of a better description, of the cabinets and kitchen furnishings that I have seen in the past. Most I have seen are more of a shelf arrangement and "hanging copper or wrought iron" ovals or rings for hanging (storage) of larger cooking vassals. For sanitary and cleanliness, I prefer to incorporate those designs with an enclosed space such as cabinet doors, if that makes any sense.

I’m pretty sure I remember Anonimo posting some really great shots of his (I think) kitchen in the home (in the country) where he lives. If it is his place, it is a really beautiful home and setting. I believe it was actually two separate places, that were turned into one rental home. Maybe I am not correct, as my memory seems to be fading lately. But whose ever place it was, it was in a lovely country setting and was really neat.

robt65



esperanza

Jun 12, 2011, 8:11 AM

Post #9 of 15 (26833 views)

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Re: [robt65] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Re using 4X4 tiles as kitchen surfaces: this is an extremely common application and as far as I know, doesn't cause any health problems. The surface, including the grout, is easy to keep clean. We do normal cleaning on ours and then spray the surfaces with Lysol or some other antibacterial. I have had this type surface in my kitchens for the last nearly 30 years without any ill effects. You, your dear wife, and your growing children will have no trouble due to a tile installation like this.

You mentioned that you are going to the States at the end of July. Consider ordering the book Mexicocina from Amazon.com. You will see gorgeous photos of the infinite possibilities for up-to-date kitchen designs based on the traditional 'looks' of old-time kitchens. The photos will help you make your design and application decisions. If you look at Mexico Cooks!, you'll see the book cover--it's a direct link to the book. Just scroll down, it's on the bottom left-hand side of my page. (Disclaimer: if you click on the book from Mexico Cooks! and then buy it, Amazon rewards me with about a nickel.)

Your idea of enclosing your kitchen equipment in cupboards is excellent, of course. You and your builder will figure out the design. We recently had a large cupboard built for our kitchen; we had it made in three separate sections to be able to get it into the narrow kitchen. It fits together precisely. Rather than use 4X4 tiles for the work surface, we used floor tiles. Our design included four wide drawers, one narrow drawer, and below the drawers, four wide cabinets and one narrow cabinet for trays and skinny pans. Works like a charm and looks beautiful.

Re the beehive oven: yes, it's fairly common to have the oven inside the house and the firebox outside. On the other hand, in today's world, it's even more common to have a gas line run into old-time designs. The old holes for leña, for example, are often converted to hold gas lines, with burners installed in the holes where the pots sit. But your wife would probably prefer a modern store-bought stove to this old style! IMHO, the stoves called 'empotrables' fit a Mexican kitchen better than any other models. Here are some images from Google: http://www.google.com/...biw=1024&bih=605. Most Mexican appliance makers manufacture them; Mabe makes wonderful models.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Vichil

Jun 12, 2011, 9:45 AM

Post #10 of 15 (26812 views)

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Re: [robt65] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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The open oven were on the outside for a good reason. I bought an old house in Chiapas and the kitchen was first the patio and then a separate building. You could always have an open oven and only use it in the winter. You could even use it for warming up the kitchen.
The old kitchen were more about protection of the food against insects and rodents than against bacterias and dust. They had open shelving very few cabinets except maybe some with reposado or mosquitoe netting or some type of fabric that would let the food breathe to protect some of the food from flies.
In the old days and still today in some states they have wooden hooks hanging from the ceiling where you could hand baskets or nets to protect the food from rodents.
The pretty trasteros had open shelving.
You may want to incorporate some of the old elements in the kitchen but many are not practical in this time and age. The trasteros are wonderful but it requires washing the dishes more often, the hanging pans are nice but they very quickly get covered with grease and dust.
In Many states in the south there are very few cabinets as any enclosed area gets mildewed. Some have doors with lattice to solve the problem etc... You just have to adjust your design to your need and climate requirement.
As you know the tile covered counter are not as easy to clean as granite which was never used.
If you want the authentic tile look you can always have cutting boards and marble pieces you put on the counter when you need them and so on.
The old look is wonderful and can be kept very clean but it requires a whole lot more work.
I also think that in fancier kitchen you had a place to cook and the bulk of dishes were kept in a separate room great if you have servant a little bit of a workout if you are by yourself.
Go and check out Frida Kalho´s kitchen in DF or in books for some ideas or some of the old kichens in Haciendas.


robt65

Jun 12, 2011, 10:36 AM

Post #11 of 15 (26797 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Esperanza,

Thanks for your in depth reply, and photo link. I happened to spot the "slide in stainless stove" and thought that looked a lot like ours. http://www.kitchenaid.com/product/KGRS807SSS.uts It is very similar. I sure like the Kitchenaid product and have had it for several years now. I wanted to get a five burner like one of your Google images (a five burner top insert) but my wife and Mother in law said no, emphatically. They like the Kitchenaid with the convection oven. We had to have the concrete opening taken out of the counter of our current rental home as the stove would not fit. I also had to order a 'propane" conversion kit for the fuel but it wasn't difficult to make the changes and it works fine. In our new home, thanks to an addition to the current kitchen we won't have that problem. I would like to buy a salamander though, as I really do like my omelets and many vegetables cooked that way.

I have also been leaning towrds exterior floor tiles for the countertops, extractor and the kitchen table.

Thanks Again,

Robt65



robt65

Jun 12, 2011, 10:51 AM

Post #12 of 15 (26790 views)

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Re: [Vichil] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Thanks Vichil,

Really a good and interesting history lesson also. I appreciate it. Hello to Hound dawg for me.

robt65


Anonimo

Jun 12, 2011, 11:37 PM

Post #13 of 15 (26756 views)

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Re: [robt65] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Robert65, our kitchen is reasonably attractive, but quite modern, essentially "American" in style. It does have white tiled walls with color accent design tiles at intervals.

Yes; the house is "ranch style" but with a more or less modern, American style interior.. A few years back it was improved from a cement block, flat roofed place to a more traditional appearing tejas tile roofed house.

(We are celebrating 5 years in this house as of August this year.)

When I can figure out where some representative photos are stored, I'll post links to them.



Saludos,
Anonimo


robt65

Jun 13, 2011, 4:50 AM

Post #14 of 15 (26746 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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Thanks Anonimo,

I really appreciate your feedback. At least I remeebered the style of your home, and that it was in the country! (smiling) You have a beautiful home.

Regards,
robt65


Carol_Wheeler

Jun 13, 2011, 10:20 PM

Post #15 of 15 (26704 views)

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Re: [Kimpatsu Hekigan] Photos of Traditional Mexican Kitchens

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I find it intriguing too, and have thought about doing something similar on the terrace. I believe the photo is from Mexican Cocinas:
http://www.mexconnect.com/...the-colonial-kitchen

It's a gorgeous book.

I recently bought Los Espacios de la Cocina Mexicana from the Artes de Mexico series, which is bilingual. It includes an essay by Diana Kennedy on The Puebla Kitchen of 1877, and images dating back to indigenous codices. A fascinating collector's magazine, it should be available at Sanborn's throughout Mexico.
 
 
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