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bbqbrisket

May 3, 2011, 4:20 AM

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Chilis / Chiles

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I am confused about Anaheim and New Mexico Chiles. Some say there is an Anaheim some say it is another name for New Mexico. Some recipes call for Anaheim and to add more heat, add New Mexico. To me, they are different but I don't know.
It does seem that the Anaheim are more difficult to find. I have a store that carries packages of dried chiles and they have both under the same brand.
Can someone shed some light on this?



Anonimo

May 3, 2011, 5:03 AM

Post #2 of 15 (8138 views)

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Re: [bbqbrisket] Chilis / Chiles

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You are not alone in being confused about chiles and their names. There's wide variation in names both in the U.S. and in Mexico.

U.S. supermarkets really have the names confused. Now I'll give you my take on your question, and it's only an opinion.
Anaheim chiles are long, slender, pale to medium green in color when unripe. (I've never seen then red ripe.) The heat level is very mild. Never have seen them any way but fresh or canned.

There are more than one type of New Mexico Chiles. Some are mild and others hotter. It's possible that a counterpart to the Anaheim chile is also grown in New Mexico, but I don't know its name.

I have been out of touch with New Mexico and its chiles since the early '90s. Maybe we should do some basic Internet research such as this article: http://en.wikipedia.org/.../New_Mexican_cuisine

Truthfully, I've had to curtail my chile intake as I get older.



Saludos,
Anonimo


Rolly


May 3, 2011, 5:58 AM

Post #3 of 15 (8128 views)

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Re: [bbqbrisket] Chilis / Chiles

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You'll find a clear discussion of all kinds of fresh chiles here, including Anaheim and New Mexico.

Dried chile information here.

Rolly Pirate


chinagringo


May 3, 2011, 6:00 AM

Post #4 of 15 (8126 views)

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Re: [bbqbrisket] Chilis / Chiles

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For more information than you probably wanted to know about the New Mexico Chile, he is a link to the info page from The Chile Pepper Institute at New Mexico State University:
http://www.chilepepperinstitute.org/chile_information.php

Personally, I liken the fixation on chiles in this State to the tenets of some radical religion.
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



esperanza

May 3, 2011, 7:18 AM

Post #5 of 15 (8114 views)

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Re: [bbqbrisket] Chilis / Chiles

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Neither Anaheim nor New Mexico chiles are found in Mexico--at least not in central Mexico.

For more information about just a few of Mexico's fresh chiles, read here: http://mexicocooks.typepad.com/...os-fresh-chiles.html.

For a few of our common dried chiles, read here: http://mexicocooks.typepad.com/...os-dried-chiles.html

Edited to add: I took a look at the first link in Rolly's post. Some of the information is accurate, but there are many, many errors in both nomenclature, usage, spelling, and pronunciation. For example, the information about the Anaheim chile calls it 'chile verde', which is incorrect. Typically, it's the serrano chile that is called chile verde. The description goes on to say that the Anaheim is perfect for chiles rellenos; typically, the fresh chile used for that dish is the poblano. Further, the writer says, "Mexican cooks also like to dice or purée them, and then add them to sauces, soups, and casseroles." Mexican cooks, at least in my 30+ years of experience living, cooking, and eating in Mexico, rarely if ever use Anaheims for any of those things. And that's just the first entry on that link!

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









(This post was edited by esperanza on May 3, 2011, 7:27 AM)


bbqbrisket

May 3, 2011, 7:18 AM

Post #6 of 15 (8111 views)

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Re: [Rolly] Chilis / Chiles

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Rolly,
Your site referral is an excellent lay out of all the chiles and their definitions. I have seen other charts that contradict this one by muddling up the names as AKA chiles. I guess one has to select the one chart they believe in and go with it.


Anonimo

May 4, 2011, 2:40 AM

Post #7 of 15 (8066 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Chilis / Chiles

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The use of chiles in Mexico is very different, and generally more complex, than the way the are used in NEW Mexico. NEW Mexican cuisine is very different than MEXICAN. Not necessarily inferior, just different.

When we were visited New Mexico, we were often served chiles rellenos made with long, slender, thinner skinned chiles.

Now, shield your eyes, Esperanza: once we were served a "chile relleno" in NEW Mexico that had processed orange cheese as the filling. I suspect that it came from a "Mexican Food Factory" and was shipped frozen, to the restaurant. When we bit into it, the breading came away from the chile as a long, hollow tube. (Yes; they were breaded, not battered.)

Now, back in OLD Mexico, we have had variations on the chile relleno that don't use the chile poblano. Some use rehydrated dried chiles such as chiles pasillas; some even were chipotles rellenos. Good, and not as picante as you might imagine. But I agree that the majority of chiles rellenos here SOB are made with chiles poblanos.



Saludos,
Anonimo


chinagringo


May 7, 2011, 7:47 PM

Post #8 of 15 (7993 views)

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Re: [bbqbrisket] Chilis / Chiles

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When it comes to chiles, NM is way over the top! Six years ago, Kathy's company flew me down here to convince me that we should transfer here. We went out for dinner at an Italian restaurant, I ordered chicken fettucine and low and behold, it had green chiles in it. Then you have McDonalds, Burger King and Wendys all offering green chile cheeseburgers. On the local ABC affiliate, their weekly restaurant inspection report, green is a pass and red is a flunk. Mexican food is one thing and New Mexican food is another. New Mexican food is just a smother in red or green and totally lacks the subtile nuances of real Mexican regional food.

Then just this evening, I was looking through the latest edition of FOOD & WINE magazine and spotted a brief blurb where Santa Fe Brewing Company is introducing a Green Chile Pale Ale. I give up!
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



MazDee

May 8, 2011, 10:11 AM

Post #9 of 15 (7948 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Chilis / Chiles

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All the supermarkets in Mazatlán sell Anaheims, so somebody here must use them. I have used them for what you could call a chile relleno salad. Several kinds of veggies are marinated and stuffed into the marinated chiles and served cold. It makes a nice change from green salad for a heavy meal. Poblanos would be too large for this. I also stuff jalapeños and dried chiles. I think the reason Anaheim's are mentioned as being used for chiles rellenos is because these were the 1st larger chiles available fresh in the US, at least in Oregon and California. Before that, we all used Ortega Roasted Green Chiles to make our rellenos, again these were Anaheims. We are talking about the 60s and 70s!
I think you will agree, Esperanza, that different parts of the country use different names for the same chile. I'm not sure one is more correct than another. But, poblanos in California are called pasillas, and that may be stretching it!


Authentic Mexican Recipes


May 27, 2011, 2:50 AM

Post #10 of 15 (7739 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] Chilis / Chiles

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In Reply To
New Mexican food is just a smother in red or green and totally lacks the subtile nuances of real Mexican regional food. !


Amen, same with a lot of Tex-Mex and other US Mexican cuisine I've sampled in the past two years on brief trips around the area. It's like the restaurant owners are thinking along the lines of "well, we 'gotta make this a "Mexican" restaurant, so let's make the usual stuff 'n throw in some chiles!--that'll work!"

I have to shake my head because sometimes the way they are used is so out of place and ...tacy. Not always because there are some great authentic Mexican restaurants I've been to north of the border, but often it seems like they're simply in the dishes to "add some spice" to the dish.

It's so different in Mexico, the way the chiles are integrated into the dishes in a natural way, where they add an additional layer of flavor that fits in with the rest of the dish. It's impressive.

Cooking authentic Mexican recipes, be it tacos, Mexican beans, or any dish for that matter, is sure way to put a smile on your guests' face.


mazbook1


May 27, 2011, 6:01 PM

Post #11 of 15 (7706 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] Chilis / Chiles

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Well chinagringo, I lived in Albuquerque and Santa Fe most of my life before coming to México, and when you say:

> New Mexican food is just a smother in red or green and totally lacks the subtile nuances of real Mexican regional food.

I take great exception to that. Obviously, you haven't really tried to find real New Mexican restaurants at all. There are still lots of them and they don't DON'T serve the gringoized tourist food that you seem to have encountered. My Mexican family LOVES it when I cook some of MY authentic New Mexican recipes. They are always asking for me to do more.


DavidHF

May 27, 2011, 6:15 PM

Post #12 of 15 (7703 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] Chilis / Chiles

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That sounds great Mazbook, where is your restaurant located? Many years ago I had occasion to be in New Mexico on a regular basis and had the great fortune to be pointed to some very good New Mexican restaurants. Now that I live in Mexico I find that most (but not all) Mexican food in the US is far from true Mexican cuisine. That's OK because the same can be said for Italian, Chinese, German, et al. It always come down to the ingredients and usually the authentic items whether cheese, spices, chiles, sausage, or whatever are simply not available in the US. The result it that the chefs do the best they can given what they have to work with.


chinagringo


May 27, 2011, 8:13 PM

Post #13 of 15 (7693 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] Chilis / Chiles

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One's perception or opinion of a particular style of food is subjective and generally dictated by their history with said food. We are going on our 7th year of living in NM and 12th year of traveling to Mexico. We happen to prefer the regional food that Mexico offers as opposed to the "smother in chile style" in NM! To put it in a more simplistic definition, so far we have only found one bar/restaurant in Santa Fe that can even make a margarita comparable to those that we find in Mexico without searching.

That doesn't make our opinion right or wrong but simply a matter of personal preference! You mention that your Mexican family enjoys New Mexican style food. Is this because it is something different to them? I remember many years ago when I had a business relationship with three Japanese business owners in Denver. They were absolute fanatics about trying the latest so-called Mexican restaurants that opened within the city.
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



mazbook1


May 28, 2011, 3:29 PM

Post #14 of 15 (7666 views)

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Re: [DavidHF] Chilis / Chiles

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First of all, DavidHF, You are mixing up New Mexican cuisine with Mexican cuisine. New Mexican cuisine IS a regional Mexican cuisine, at least it was until February 2, 1848 when New Mexico became part of the United States.

But since New Mexico was actually physically separated from what is now México by hundreds of miles of rather forbidding desert (the Chihuahua desert), the Spaniards who settled in northern New Mexico pretty much developed their own unique cuisine (as did the similarly isolated Spaniards in the Yucatán) based primarily on corn (nixtamalizado), chiles (particularly dried, red chiles), squash (and other indigenous foods), and the European vegetables, spices and beef they brought with them.

As Spaniards, with very little contact with the growing mestizo culture of México, they actually were a quite different culture in many ways and non-participants in the 1810-1821 War of Independence. And you must remember, they were really only part of México for the 27 years between Independence and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo when they, quite peacefully (with little exception), became a part of the United States. As late as the 1950s, it was still nearly "fighting words" to call a native Spanish-speaking New Mexican a "Mexican". They were, and in some cases still are, "Spanish" or "Spanish-Americans", and they still resent being called "Mexican" or "Chicano". Interestingly enough, many were "conversos" and the very recent studies and identification of some families' traditions as having Judaic origins (in all of México and New Mexico) actually began in New Mexico. The fact that many were conversos may explain why no mestizo culture grew up in this distant outpost of New Spain.

After being opened to trade with the U.S. after the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, other European foods, particularly wheat and wheat flour became common and the New Mexican cuisine drifted further and further from any particular purely Mexican regional cuisine. Even the most common "salsa" in New Mexico came to depend on canned tomatoes (about the only recipe in "traditional" New Mexican cuisine that is tomato based.) As late as the 1960s it was still a shock to many northern New Mexicans how different the regional Mexican cuisine in the closest Mexican city, Ciudad Juárez, Chihuahua, was from northern New Mexican cuisine.

Of course the coming of the gringo tourists, something that began in the 1920s and grew exponentially after the Second World War, the local cuisine began to change, at least in the restaurants seeking the tourist business, and this change was accelerated by the influx of transplants from the eastern U.S. from the 1960s onward, until now, native Spanish-speaking New Mexicans are less than 50% of the population, and the gringoized, tourist style, "Mexican" restaurants far outnumber the authentic New Mexican ones.

However, authentic New Mexican cuisine is still relatively easy to find in the Spanish-speaking neighborhoods of northern New Mexico from Socorro at the southern end, Taos (maybe-it has become pretty touristy) at the northern end, Gallup at the west, Cuba at the northwest, Mora at the northeast and Tucumcari on the east.

For chinagringo in Albuquerque, he should check out the small restaurants in the neighborhoods Martineztown and Five Points, and also in the little town of Bernalillo only 15 miles to the north. He will find authentic New Mexican cuisine there, but yes, as it was from the beginning, it is heavily based on dried red chile, although with the coming of inexpensive refrigeration, green chile, formerly a very, very seasonal food (August-September) has become available to locals as well as the country.

There's lots more I could write about New Mexican cuisine, particularly the growth of the gringo "green chile cult", but enough is enough.

(This post was edited by mazbook1 on May 28, 2011, 3:53 PM)


chinagringo


May 28, 2011, 5:41 PM

Post #15 of 15 (7650 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] Chilis / Chiles

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Mazbook:

My history in New Mexico goes back to 1968 and carried into the 70's. At that point in time, Albuquerque had an overabundance of fine Mexican restaurants and certainly not much more! Heck, with the exception of the Monterrey Inn, you really couldn't find a decent steak joint. Going forward to 2004, many of the real Mexican restaurants graduated to New Mexican restaurants. Yes "five points" and Martineztown do have their offerings but I refuse to carry a gun. Both of these areas are "cartel heaven" and way too much bad stuff happens in those hoods!

As it so happens we ventured up to the "City Different" today and that has become the epitome of New Mexican! We never realized that there were enough rocks to blow over in the wind for those that epitomize the""Santa Fe look" to come out from under! In our travels of Mexico, the only place that comes close in our estimation is San Miguel de Allende.

We do have a favorite bar/restaurant that serves probably the best margarita north of the border in NM. One of their claims to fame is that they marinate their limes for a minimum of 24 hours in tequila. Since we stopped in early, we were able to watch the bartender preparing a batch of limes. Easily 50 limes quartered into an acrylic tub and then three .75l
bottles of Tequila. Served in a chilled glass from a martini shaker of about two glasses. Would have been great to have one BUT in NM, I will no longer get behind the wheel even after one drink. It has become too nasty and simply not worth it. I would bet when you were here they still had drive up windows at many of the bars?
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM

 
 
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