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Denis

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #1 of 9 (1828 views)

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Bacalao

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I've seen salt cod (bacalao) in Mexican supermarkets but can't find any Mexican recipes that use it. Although that Cuban one with the fricasee on RecipeSource was pretty tempting. Any suggestions?




Denis

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #2 of 9 (1823 views)

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Bacalao - thank you

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That's a lot of bacalao! Not to mention a lot of olives. This recipe has got to be Catalan, on account of the almonds and raisins. I know it says it's Basque, but I doubt it. I actually now have more salt cod recipes than I know what to do with, including a Spanish tapa that involves New Mexico chiles, but none of them seem particularly Mexican. The first response to my post, the Bacalao Español from RecipeSource, does note that Mexicans developed a liking for a dish which was originally Spanish.

By the way, someone told me that salt cod was originally preserved to take on sea voyages. Aren't there lots of fish in the sea? Curious.



jennifer rose

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #3 of 9 (1820 views)

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The invention of bacalao

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The story I heard was that salt cod was "invented" so that fisherman could haul back more fish to port. Salting it on board preserved the fish, enabled the fisherman to catch more, and stay out at sea longer. Back in the times when there just wasn't a lot of refrigeration on board fishing vessels, y'know.



Dorothy

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #4 of 9 (1822 views)

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Bacalao: Oaxacan Recipe Traditional for Semana Santa

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Pescado con Frijoles Blancos

This is traditionally served in Oaxaca during Semana Santa.

Leave the dry fish soak in water overnight.
In the morning rinse the fish and cut in serving size pieces.
Boil white beans (the small ones) in water.
Rinse the cooked beans and put them in fresh water.
Add ground comino and garlic to the water to make a bean soup.
Beat some egg whites until stiff.
Gently fold in the egg yolks to the batter.
Dip pieces of some of the fish in the batter and fry well in some oil. Reserve some other fish for later.
Add a little salt to whatever batter is left and fry that in oil.
Tear up the fried egg batter in pieces and add it to the bean soup.
Fry some sliced onion and tomato and add that to the bean soup.
Add some flat leaf parsely leaves (no stems) to the soup.
Add the fish you didn't fry to the soup.
Taste the soup and add salt to taste.
Serve the soup with some pieces of the fried fish on the side.




Uncle Jack

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #5 of 9 (1822 views)

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Not only that

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Not only could the fishermen stay out longer by preserving the cod but, as it dried and the moisture was removed, the cargo became lighter and they could almost triple the number of fish the ship would hold.

I think that the Basque were the first to do this; follow soon after by the Portugese and the Spanish.



jennifer rose

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #6 of 9 (1822 views)

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Bacalao

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BACALAO VIZCAYA

1.5 to 2 kilos bacalao (legitimate Norwegian salt cod, without bones). Don’t buy the flat board-like sheets. Use the thicker more expensive filet.

2 kilos tomato. Preferably Roma, although any kind of red tomato will work.

Raisins to taste

200 grams almonds (or more), slivered

500-600 grams green olives. I prefer the olives which still have the seeds, because it takes people longer to eat. If using seeded olives, use less.

Italian parsley to taste

3 cloves garlic (or more)

1 medium or large white or yellow onion

1 glass of brandy

Cooking oil

Pinch of Knorr Suiza caldo de pollo

Starting 2 days before cooking, soak the bacalao in water in an enamel, glass or non-reactive vessel. Drain and change the water every 6 hours.

After the final bath, drain the water again.

Flake the fish.

Cook the almonds lightly in a small amount butter, and then slightly toast them.

Zap the garlic, tomato and onion in the blender until finely pureed. Using a small amount of cooking oil, make a sofrito in a large frying pan, casserole, or something big enough to accommodate all of the rest of the ingredients. If I were making this again, I’d use olive oil. Cook the garlic-tomato-onion mixture until about 75% of the liquid is gone. Add a tiny pinch of Knorr Suiza.

Add the fish to the sofrito, along with the almonds, chopped parsley, raisins, and a glass of brandy. Stir it around, and cook covered for about 15 minutes. Add the olives. If you don’t like olives, you could add drained capers.

Do not add any salt, because there’s still some residual salt in the fish.

Refrigerate for a day or so for the flavors to meld. If it seems a little dry, make some more sofrito and add it to the mixture.

Serve at room temperature.

Refrigerated, the dish should be good for about a week. This recipe makes a huge quantity!

(This post was edited by jennifer rose on Dec 20, 2002, 8:48 PM)


Uncle Jack

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #7 of 9 (1823 views)

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Suggestion

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Did you see this one?:

http://www.recipesource.com/ethnic/americas/mexican/bacalao-espanol1.html



Al

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #8 of 9 (1819 views)

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Suggestion

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I did. Como se dice cod fish en espanol?






Denis

Nov 30, 1919, 12:00 AM

Post #9 of 9 (1819 views)

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Suggestion

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That does sound good, thank you. I missed it on RecipeSource because it's labeled Español.

 
 
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