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arbon

Jul 28, 2010, 10:48 AM

Post #51 of 63 (8792 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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"here in Mexico we usually eat 'dent' corn in pozole, nixtamal-ized and ground for tortillas, tamales, etc. That kind of corn is normally considered to be 'field corn', or animal feed, in the USA. You Canadians may think differently."


http://www.agmrc.org/...ite_corn_profile.cfm

The United States exports from 25 to 30 percent of its white corn. Exports grew rapidly during the 1990s from 20 million to nearly 62.4 million bushels in 2002 but have subsequently declined. According to USDA's Ag Marketing Service, the United States exported nearly 7.6 million bushels of white corn in 2008.

Mexico grows more white corn than yellow corn, focusing on the production of food-grade white corn products rather than on the production of yellow corn for animal rations. Because their production usually does not meet their consumption demand, Mexico was historically the largest importer of U.S. white corn, buying over 50 percent of U.S. exports. Since 2000, however, white corn exports to Mexico have fallen sharply because the Mexican government has provided incentives for domestic farmers to increase production. In 2008 Mexico imported only 3.8 million bushels of U.S. white corn.
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yTABDGdW

Jul 28, 2010, 11:32 AM

Post #52 of 63 (8783 views)

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Re: [arbon] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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Mexico shouldnt be importing any corn from anybody/anywhere. Ridiculous.


arbon

Jul 28, 2010, 12:10 PM

Post #53 of 63 (8778 views)

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Re: [Memo] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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"Mexico shouldnt be importing any corn from anybody/anywhere. Ridiculous."

If Mexico stops importing it will also have to stop exporting.
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yTABDGdW

Jul 28, 2010, 1:56 PM

Post #54 of 63 (8760 views)

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Re: [arbon] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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Fine by me. Perhaps then millions of Mexicans wouldnt have to abandon their farms and risk their lives to be used like slaves of American big business. Pinko alert!!!!!


arbon

Jul 28, 2010, 5:09 PM

Post #55 of 63 (8734 views)

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Re: [Memo] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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We were only talking about 1% of the U.S. corn production, animal feed was not included.

from the same link

"Approximately 3 percent of the annual U.S. corn production is used for human consumption. Of that, white corn accounts for less than 1 percent. However, demand is climbing as the U.S. Latino population and the popularity of their cuisine grows throughout the United States. Traditionally, white corn, rather than yellow corn, is preferred for Mexican-style food like tortillas and for other corn-based foods including corn flakes, corn meal, grits and hominy."
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esperanza

Jul 28, 2010, 5:26 PM

Post #56 of 63 (8729 views)

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Re: [arbon] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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We're comparing apples and oranges here. White corn--the kind that is used for food in Mexico--would be laughed off the table in the USA. White corn, both the kind imported to Mexico AND the kind grown here, is nothing like the tender, sugar-sweet white corn that Americans eat for supper.

Memo is right: why is Mexico importing corn? Why is Monsanto working so hard to stick its nose into Mexico's corn business? Mexico's criollo (native) corn, millenia old, is in grave danger. Many of us are working tooth and toenail to preserve it. Once Monsanto gets its GMO corn into this country, we can kiss real corn goodbye.

As I mentioned in an earlier post, I will post a link ON THIS THREAD on Saturday, July 31, that will offer some words re the history and the future of corn in Mexico.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









arbon

Jul 28, 2010, 5:48 PM

Post #57 of 63 (8721 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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¿Looks like you missed post #51, and the link ..............but where did you see "Sweet Corn" mentioned?

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There are only four countries in the World, that produce more food than they use, America, Argentina, Australia and Canada, ........Canada also imports corn from America.
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chinagringo


Jul 28, 2010, 6:15 PM

Post #58 of 63 (8715 views)

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Re: [arbon] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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Arbon:

Your are really dating yourself with the use of "America" - in recent times, it is more often referred to as the United States or the "excited states".
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



esperanza

Jul 28, 2010, 6:25 PM

Post #59 of 63 (8708 views)

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Re: [arbon] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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¿Looks like you missed post #51, and the link ..............but where did you see "Sweet Corn" mentioned?
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There are only four countries in the World, that produce more food than they use, America, Argentina, Australia and Canada, ........Canada also imports corn from America.

I read post #51. And I'm the only one who has mentioned sweet corn.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Hound Dog

Jul 28, 2010, 7:07 PM

Post #60 of 63 (8701 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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White corn--the kind that is used for food in Mexico--would be laughed off the table in the USA. White corn, both the kind imported to Mexico AND the kind grown here, is nothing like the tender, sugar-sweet white corn that Americans eat for supper.

Not quite correct. Non-sweet white corn is a staple in the southern United States and is used to make corn meal for
corn bread, cornpone, hush puppies and a number of white corn meal derivative products. White corn meal is also used for frying green tomatoes as made famous by the movie Fried Green Tomatoes at the Whistle Stop Cafe of a few years ago and for frying fish and shellfish in many down-home seafood shacks along the shores of Mobile Bay. The genetically altered super sweet corn now often served on U.S. dinner tables as corn-on-the-cob or stewed corn kernals as accompàniments to main meat, poultry and fish dishes is a relatively recent innovation and did not exist when Dawg was a kid in Alabama. The corn in the U.S. in those days tended to be mealy and not particularly sweet as is most corn in Mexico today.

Personally, I prefer to make my corn bread, hush-puppies, cornbread muffins and cornbread based dressing for fowl with yellow corn meal which is also made from non-sweet yellow corn. That is considered a heresy in the deep south but then I lived in the San Francisco Bay Area for about 30 years so I am allowed to make this adjustment to the sacred white cornmeal base for these products of my home oven. However, when I return to Alabama, I do not brag about this fault of mine and revert to white corn meal in the interest of domestic peace.

By the way, just today, I purchased imported super sweet yellow corn-on-the-cob at Super Lake in San Antonio Tlayacapan so I can assure you that the super sweet varieties are not limited to white corn. We never find that super sweet imported corn-on-the-cob in San Cristóbal de Las Casas and, while there eat only corn grown in nearby milpas and,then, only corn just picked that day and rushed to our home down there for cooking. These "elotes" only have a hint of sweetness if any sweetness at all and tend to be very starchy and tough. That´s OK, I kind of like starchy corn-on-the-cob and find the American super sweet corn to be somewhat insipid.


Anonimo

Jul 29, 2010, 6:54 AM

Post #61 of 63 (8665 views)

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Re: [Peter] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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(I've been busy, and so return late to this excellent discussion.)

Peter wrote" "No one I have spoken to here in Morelia seems to have heard of churipo but as you described it before some may just know it as a type of caldo de res. What does make it churipo? "

How does churipo differ from mole de olla, a dish which is one of my favorites? Or, is churipo just the Purhépecha name for mole de olla? Is it the accompanying corundas that make the difference?

I first had an undistinguished churipo, resemblng beef stew in tomato sauce, years ago at a restaurant on Av Madero in Morelia, facing the Catedral.
More recently, I had a very casero version prepared by Sra. Amparo Cervantes and her cooks at the restaurant in the patio of the Inst. Tecnológico in Tzurumutaro. That version, when I at ast had it, was inferior (undercooked, tough, meager vegetables, etc.) to various moles de ollas I've had elsewhere, including the matriz Restaurante El Bajío, in México, D.F. and from a lone cocinera on a street corner in Col/Roma Sur, México. However, the Tzuru cooks made the best corundas I've ever had: smaller, lighter, and I would order 3 or four to eat with their wonderful mole. (I'm not sure if that weekends only restaurant is still operating).


pyrotalk

Jul 25, 2015, 7:59 AM

Post #62 of 63 (4811 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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People have misconception that corn was domesticated in Mexico but it was also domesticated in Peru 8,000BC as well.. The peruvian corn is totally different and not sweet. Like cuzco and purple corn that can only grow in the andes. Most of the domesticated mexican products came from Peru like cacao seeds, plum tomatoes, etc Odd that peruvian food has not been declared this award yet as no one in this planet has domesticated more produces than ever before.


http://bulbnrose.x10.mx/Heredity/Cook/Cook_Peru2/Cook_Peru2.html


YucaLandia


Jul 25, 2015, 10:56 AM

Post #63 of 63 (4792 views)

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Re: [pyrotalk] Mexican cuisine declared a Cultural Heritage of Humanity

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Are there new (2015?) results that overturn pre-2015 research results?

Molecular biological, carbon dating (of burned cobs), and archeological data from 2009 - 2014 describe a different narrative from the proposal about Peru's early pop-corn usage, instead finding that natives in Mexico were using corn a full 2,000 years earlier than Peru.

Dolores Piperno, a curator at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History, and National Acadamy of Sciences inductee's works show maize was domesticated from its wild ancestor more than 8,700 years (as confirmed by biological evidence uncovered by researchers in the Mexico's Central Balsas River Valley). In 2009, 2012, and subsequent 2014 reports, Mexico has had the earliest dated evidence, by at least 1,200 years, for the presence and use of domesticated maize.

Details: Piperno et al have published even more detailed molecular-biological, corrected-carbon dating, and archeological results that all show that Mexico's corn domestication predated Peru's earliest corn evidence by a full 2,000 years.

see http://anthropology.si.edu/archaeobio/cm/Piperno%20et%20al%202014%20QI.pdf
and http://www.pnas.org/content/109/5/1755.abstract

Happy Trails,
steve
-
Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Jul 25, 2015, 11:00 AM)
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