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jennifer rose

Jun 18, 2002, 6:17 PM

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When a U.S. Citizen Dies in Mexico

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Whisking the decedent back to the US is not the solution. Surely you would seek medical help if the signs of death were imminent. Find out ahead of time what your godfatherís wishes are for disposal of his remains.<p>The Mexican authorities will issue a Mexican death certificate, which contains about the same information as a death certificate issued in the U.S. does. What the decedentís wishes were for disposal of his remains will determine what steps to take next. If cremation or burial in Mexico is an option, then a lot of problems will have already been solved. <p>If the decedent wished his remains to be returned to the U.S., youíll need to follow the procedures set forth at http://travel.state.gov/return.html At http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/GeRemains.htm are shown the options and costs for disposition of remains in the Guadalajara area. Bear in mind that these are 1999 figures, and the cost of dying likely has increased since then.<p>Now, the issue of who may authorize cremation varies from state to state in Mexico, and since youíre not your godfatherís next-of-kin, it may be necessary to secure an affidavit of permission from him while heís still alive. <p>The final step involves obtaining the Consular Report of a U.S. Citizen Died Abroad, which is then used for legal purposes in the U.S. And for that, youíll need to follow the directions shown at http://travel.state.gov/deathrep.html



John R

Jun 18, 2002, 10:57 PM

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Death and the law

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This is a wonderful thread, though I most feverently hope that all of the advice offered herein is wholly useless.<p>Most legal systems do tend to be utterly fascinated by in death: the process of bringing it about and the results of its occurrence. And so they tend to be really, often dangerously itchy when deaths occur and people try to skirt procedure.<p>As you most delightfully say, "Whisking the decedent back to the US is not the solution."<p>It reminded me of story told me -- egad, more than 20 years ago -- by a man who was then a very old but very entertaining Nevada politician. A gentleman died a few days before the electorate was to vote on his candidacy for the U.S. Senate (If I recall). His friends choked back their grief and kept the statesman on ice in a bathtub at a hotel in Tonopah until after the vote was in and certified. And it wasn't easy to find ice in Tonopah in those days.<p>
: The Mexican authorities will issue a Mexican death certificate, which contains about the same information as a death certificate issued in the U.S. does. What the decedentís wishes were for disposal of his remains will determine what steps to take next. If cremation or burial in Mexico is an option, then a lot of problems will have already been solved. <p>: If the decedent wished his remains to be returned to the U.S., youíll need to follow the procedures set forth at http://travel.state.gov/return.html At http://www.usembassy-mexico.gov/GeRemains.htm are shown the options and costs for disposition of remains in the Guadalajara area. Bear in mind that these are 1999 figures, and the cost of dying likely has increased since then.<p>: Now, the issue of who may authorize cremation varies from state to state in Mexico, and since youíre not your godfatherís next-of-kin, it may be necessary to secure an affidavit of permission from him while heís still alive. <p>: The final step involves obtaining the Consular Report of a U.S. Citizen Died Abroad, which is then used for legal purposes in the U.S. And for that, youíll need to follow the directions shown at http://travel.state.gov/deathrep.html<p>
 
 
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