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db52

Dec 17, 2009, 10:59 AM

Post #26 of 49 (9743 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Trollistically! Heh.


Oscar2

Dec 17, 2009, 12:04 PM

Post #27 of 49 (9720 views)

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Re: [db52] Pedestrian Friendly?

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I thought it might catch some ones eye and since it did, besides a funny way of coining a word, it’s really just a take-off of the real word “Troll.” Check it out..

http://communitiesonline.homestead.com/dealingwithtrolls.html


Gringal

Dec 17, 2009, 12:33 PM

Post #28 of 49 (9710 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Okay, Oscar2...I checked the reference out. And yes, "trollistically" is a fine new word. I'm not sure it could be accurately applied to anyone on here, though. Most of the time, the bloviating seems to be intended as territory marking. "I'm the biggest dog on the street", rather than an attempt to subvert the discussion.

On another matter, I was suggesting to Frito that he look on the real estate sites on the net only because it is an easy way to get a general idea of what realtors are trying to sell properties for in various areas of Mexico. Quite a variety. It is also true that up front and personal shopping and bargaining will get the best deal.

Bearing in mind that the OP says he's poor and wants easy walking........we can eliminate a bunch of places right up front, such as San Miguel de Allende. Chapala could be a good bet, though. Fluency in Spanish is a biggie for some places which would otherwise be good choices.


Oscar2

Dec 17, 2009, 1:23 PM

Post #29 of 49 (9699 views)

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Re: [Gringal] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Quote
Bearing in mind that the OP says he's poor and wants easy walking........we can eliminate a bunch of places right up front, such as San Miguel de Allende. Chapala could be a good bet, though. Fluency in Spanish is a biggie for some places which would otherwise be good choices.



I agree, and perhaps things got side tracked with the mix of suggestions. As you mentioned, I was there for a week and San Miguel is a bit hilly, like some other communities and having “stood” in other large and small cities as well as Ajijic for 3 weeks, pedestrian friendly cities do give rise to some other best experiences. In addition you absolutely are right, fluency in Spanish is a biggie especially in Morelia who's expat community is thin.

For walking in comfort, I particularly enjoyed Morelia, due in part to easy access and wide, clean large paved sidewalks. For me, this was especially nice and comfortable. Taxis and combis are dirt cheap and take you just about anywhere you want to go in the city for 5 pesos and taxis 20 pesos. Thus far, I’ve been hard pressed to find it in such abundance in other cities. Large cobblestone does not agree with me but doesn’t seem to adversely effect others.

Its all a matter of choice but I refuse to denigrate other cities based on a drive by conclusion or otherwise. This is unfair to Ajijic, which has been scourged in the past unfairly by someone we all know especially by those who have been around awhile. Ruling out other cities without personal actual staying awhile and at least feeling out what it maybe you may find worthy of being a favorite, I believe would be ill advised.

You’ve been around for sometime now and you have a good idea of what is stirring here on MC.


(This post was edited by Oscar2 on Dec 17, 2009, 2:31 PM)


Gringal

Dec 17, 2009, 3:19 PM

Post #30 of 49 (9679 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Yes, I've been here awhile. Anyone who actually has lived in a town without a bias against it when he/she arrives can describe its good and bad points. Some see only the good....or the bad. For instance, I lived for three years in the much maligned San Miguel de Allende. Most of the slams against it have little justification. It's a beautiful town and many people of modest means whose feet are firmly planted on the ground happily live there. There is plenty of unfounded snobbery as well (Where the dead sergeant's wife becomes the general's widow) and wannabee poets, artists and the suchlike finding happiness in their reinventions.

As for Ajijic, I live there now and it suits me well. Nice walking streets and a lake path that's hard to beat. As for the population......we found friends of like mind who enjoy the things we do. There are also people I wouldn't want to know beyond nodding acquaintance here. I find that Ajijic is especially well suited to those who are past the mountain-climbing age (lol) and appreciate the availabilty of good health care as well as a nice collection of decently priced restaurants for most tastes. Big city pleasures are not to be reasonably expected out here in the "provinces". Been there, did all that and enjoyed it thoroughly at the time...but don't think world class dining and entertainment is about to arrive any day soon. That doesn't in the least interfere with my enjoyment of the place, the people and the gorgeous scenery.

So, "pedestrian friendly" guy....a lot of what you'll enjoy has to do with your age, your tastes and your expectations.
Good luck in finding your personal paradise.


frito

Dec 17, 2009, 5:59 PM

Post #31 of 49 (9658 views)

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Re: [Gringal] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Thanks Gringal, and Ken, and Vichil(Great info!!). I'm currently working in deep east Texas and can't tell you how much I appreciate getting good advice from people who love Mexico. I've learned quickly here not to tell anyone, especially coworkers, that I'm contemplating moving to Mexico. Not exaggerating! My one friend I can discuss this with is a very beautiful convenience store clerk who's originally from Reynosa. Unfortunately married, but still fun to talk to. Thanks again!


Papirex


Dec 17, 2009, 6:24 PM

Post #32 of 49 (9654 views)

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Re: [Gringal] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Well said Gringal. I think the best place for any of us to live is wherever we are happy, I had 40 years to find my place. The official population of Cuernavaca where we live is only 440,000 people, but there are probably about a million people in the metropolitan area. It has more of a big town feel to me rather than a city though.


We have very good shopping places right here in town, and reasonably good places to dine, mostly upscale coffee shops like Sanborns, VIPs. El Portón, and Pane, plus a few very upscale places such as La Mañanitas, The Tequila, Shanghai Gardens, The Log Yin, etc; where you want to be sure all of your monthly bills are paid before you go there to eat. If you like weak coffee there are 3 or 4 Starbucks and the ever present Burger Kings here too.


You must learn to ignore the urban legends that “everyone” will tell you. The biggest myth told about Cuernavaca is that it fills up every weekend with visitors from México City and prices rise every weekend. That doesn't happen. The merchants here are not going to offend a million consumers to take advantage of one, or maybe two thousand visitors every weekend. I don't know if the prices are raised in the nightclubs though.


My wife had an uncle and his widow still lives in Ajijic, they have been there for 50 or 60 years. We go over to visit her often. Ajijic is a nice place and I enjoy our visits there, but it is not for me. That doesn't mean that I think it is a bad place, just that I wouldn't be completely happy living there full time. I am happy here in Cuernavaca, that doesn't mean it would be a good place for everybody. We do have the best climate in all of México here, if that is of any importance. When I read posts of people living at Lakeside complaining of heat or cold or rain sometimes, I realize how lucky we are living in “The City of Eternal Spring.”


A person needs to live in an area for a while and get to know first hand if it will be a good fit for their individual lifestyles. Never believe unquestionably anything a real estate salesman says, they are unlicensed here and they have nothing to lose if they lie to you. They may be telling the truth, but if you are new to an area, you will have no way to know that.


Rex
"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo

(This post was edited by Papirex on Dec 17, 2009, 6:26 PM)


Scottm

Dec 18, 2009, 2:36 AM

Post #33 of 49 (9620 views)

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Re: [frito] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Frito, you might consider Colima. Beautiful city at the foot of a picture-perfect volcano. Super clean streets,
no major hills in town, inexpensive taxi and bus service, great medical facilities, tolerable altitude, unbelievable
downtown parks, nice accessable malls (even a Home Depot!)....
As a bonus, it's a nice bus ride to the Pacific beaches. It reminds you of a pleasant European city, and walking everywhere
is very comfortable. Yep, it is a city, but it has a small town feel about it.


Rolly


Dec 18, 2009, 7:29 AM

Post #34 of 49 (9599 views)

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Re: [Scottm] Pedestrian Friendly?

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I agree that Colima is a very special place. But it is also hot as the hinges of hades in the summer.

Rolly Pirate


esperanza

Dec 18, 2009, 7:41 AM

Post #35 of 49 (9592 views)

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Re: [Rolly] Pedestrian Friendly?

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And as Judy often says, "Hell is hot, but is it humid?"

Colima is hot AND humid, waaaaaay beyond my tolerance for either heat or humidity. It's definitely pretty, though.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Peter


Dec 18, 2009, 8:05 AM

Post #36 of 49 (9584 views)

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Re: [Papirex] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Hi Rex, Cuernavaca was a place under consideration for me based on what people had told me about it though I've yet to visit there. Perhaps its proximity to DF is the factor that might sway one in his choice, having both a plus and a negative to consider. In the end I ended up in Morelia mainly because a friend in California took me by the hand, showed me around, and introduced me to his friends and family here. Your taxi fare is cheaper so that is a plus. Morelia also claims to have the best climate though any given day could be subjectively better one place or another but in general Mexico's central highland has a very mild climate that is difficult to equal anywhere NOB.

Ajijic/Chapala was my first consideration since I was coming to Mexico alone and thought it would be the best place to land and spend some time to mainstream into the culture and language. In that situation it was very much a consideration to keep in mind as some places would have been very difficult make any headway as I was completely clueless and had to learn everything on my own, likely the hard way. Having a connection in a particular city made the decision easier. I expect Cuernavaca's proximity to DF would make it somewhat easier to get by with extremely limited Spanish for a newcomer than starting out in Chiapas or Michoacán, for instance, though I suspect the DF factor might contribute to the "hard way" learning experience. I'd be interested in you opinion.

Mexico, in general, has got to be more "pedestrian-friendly" than the US overall due to its compactness and population density. For that reason there are a great number of good choices of cities to consider making home. In retrospect I find I am glad to have come to a fairly large city. While Ajijic, San Miguel de Allende, Pátzcuaro and others are pretty and seemingly pedestrian-friendly they are just too small in the long run. Besides other factors like weather, access, level ground, and such, being pedestrian-friendly I think is also having someplace to go and perhaps something new to explore, things to keep you occupied and interested in the years to come. Oscar2 has visited here recently and has been writing about things and places right under my nose that I have yet to visit and giving me ideas about what I might want to explore in my daily outings in the time to come.

Small-town living in the US seemed good to me but here I find I like what a good-sized city has to offer. Large cities here can have a town/small city feel to it. My house somewhat on the outskirts here is very "car-friendly" and has easy access to the autopista, easy for driving out to the supermarkets, or getting out for a drive in the country, to the coast, or Lago de Pátzcuaro for the day but it now sits empty most of the time and I rent a house downtown so I can walk and explore and literally find something new every time I set out. It's seemingly endless what attractions I can find each day it suits me to walk outside my door. I think any city in Mexico of any good size offers much the same variety.

A side note to small-town living, or in any pueblo or somewhat isolated colonia: These little places can be very convenient, have a few adequately stocked tiendas, tortillarias, and conveniences very close by or just outside your door, but they also can provide a lot of drama. Telenovelas are very popular here on Mexican television. They are also popular in real-life, everyday living. Especially in the smaller places these daily dramas can make you very much an interactive player; there is always at least a bit-part for the lone gringo who dares set foot into the street and mingles with the locals, and more oftern than not they are willing to cast you as the star, especially if you are retired and have a lot of time on your hand. In the hustle-bustle of the city you get to play a more anonymous role; it's not always fun to head the cast. My advice to anyone just arriving: Don't be in too much of a rush to set down permanent roots, you might want to take your act on the road.


Manuel Dexterity

Dec 18, 2009, 9:10 AM

Post #37 of 49 (9570 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Pedestrian Friendly?

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 I have visited Colima many many times in the summer months and sometimes it is hot and sometimes it is not.


Peter


Dec 18, 2009, 10:24 AM

Post #38 of 49 (9555 views)

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Re: [Manuel Dexterity] Pedestrian Friendly?

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My experience has been summer is relatively cool at these latitudes even on the coast, relatively being the key word in regards the coast, the hottest months being spring. Colima is still on my list of places to visit, inland a bit but still relatively low altitude. Is the climate sort of like Tepic?

I recall the Ken Kesey on the lam story and the whole tribe packing up from Manzanillo largely because of the crabs crawling into bed with Mountain Girl one too many times. A couple years ago I was on the coast of Michoacán a few days in June/July and amazed at seeing the number of crabs crossing the highway which was a good bit higher up than the beach. One of those days it rained like hell and a few trees were blown down. It got downright cold. That's on the beach though and has nothing to do with the city of Colima but serves as a sidenote for considering beach towns if one is particular about sharing their bed. The part of town I stayed in in Caleta was high enough up I had no such encounters during that crab migration.


Papirex


Dec 18, 2009, 12:06 PM

Post #39 of 49 (9534 views)

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Re: [Peter] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Peter, A few comments about how I ended up in Cuernavaca. I first started visiting México in 1974 when I was living in Brownsville, Texas on the Mexican border. There were no narco gangs or high crimes in the border areas in those days.


After I returned to my home state of California, I migrated to Alaska to work on the trans-Alaska pipeline for one year. One year turned out to be several decades. I met my Mexican wife up there in Cordova, Alaska, she was in The US legally with a visa. One of the first things she told me when we discussed marriage was that she didn't want to become an American citizen, and she didn't want to spend the rest of her life in The United States. I told her that I had been to her country, I liked it, and after my retirement we would live in México, so here I am.


My wife Doris' late father was an American from Texas, and she has many relatives that live in The US legally, some of them are US citizens either by birth or naturalization. She also has a couple of aunts and uncles that are Canadian citizens by naturalization. She comes from a truly international family, but she loves her own country most of all. I love my country too, but I have done a lot of traveling in my life, and I don't care where I live as long as I am happy.


After our marriage we made many more visits to México. I had been all over this country before moving here. Doris comes from a very large, middle class family, they live all over México, although México City, DF is her hometown. When we were first married she told me if I wanted to meet her whole family I would need to rent a stadium.


That was a black lie. There isn't a stadium in México big enough to hold her whole family. Whenever we are driving on a trip and we pass by a city or town, she will usually say something like “I have an aunt, uncle, or cousins living here.” When we first moved to Cuernavaca one of the first people we ran into here was one of her cousins, the next person we ran into was an uncle.


When we first moved here we lived in México City in her mothers apartment. It is a privately owned apartment, but there is no parking there. I used to pay $400 Pesos per month for parking in a nearby estacionimiento. I have forgotten the exchange rate then, but $400 Pesos was equal to about $60 or $80 US Dollars then.


We both wanted to move out of México City. It is a wonderful place, but just too huge. Often we would leave our car at home and take a subway. We could get across town in maybe 20 minutes versus 1 ½ or 2 hours in the car, and no parking hassles when we got to our destination. I will say that although I like México City very much, every time I get a chance to not go there now, I take it.


My wife thought I would like Ajijic because of all the English speakers there, I like Ajijic but I never wanted to live there. We both knew about the great climate in Cuernavaca, it is much warmer in the winter here than in México City and of course, she has some relatives here. We moved here about ten years ago. No regrets, it is perfect for us even though very little English is spoken here, I adapted very quickly.


There are very few, almost no, English speakers in any stores, restaurants, government offices, banks etc. here. If an English speaking employee is available, they usually speak English so crudely that they are not understandable. With my crude Spanish, I sometimes resort to the point and grunt method. I never ask for a menu in English in a restaurant. Sometimes if I want to try something new, I will point to something on a menu and say “numero cinco por favor.” They understand that. The proximity to México City is no advantage at all, except that my wife and her mother go there after the first of every month to take care of family business.


We do enjoy going to the beaches on the coasts in the winter only. We are only about 3 or 3 ½ hours from Acapulco by car here, it is our favorite beach city and we have some friends that own a nice Mexican hotel there. We can get a two bedroom suite with a living room/cocineta on a terraza for about $40 US Dollars. Each bedroom has two double beds and a private bath. We can always get reservations no matter how busy they are on any holiday.


It appears to me that many of the people planning to move to México are looking for a perpetual vacation. There is no such thing. Life is life, no matter where you live. One of the biggest mistakes I think people make is to come here in the winter and immediately buy a house because of the nice, warm weather.


On the last trip we made here before my retirement, we went over to Acapulco for a week. When we were getting ready to leave I was putting on long pants for the first time in a week. It was January 4th and it was 84º F. If it was 84º in January, imagine what it is like in August.


Any time a person lives where there are a lot of NOB retirees, prices will always be higher, not much, but measurably higher. There are not many Americans or Canadians in Cuernavaca. I don't discourage anyone from moving here, but I don't encourage them either.


With luck, we will all find our place in México. I have found my place.


Rex
"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo


Manuel Dexterity

Dec 18, 2009, 1:36 PM

Post #40 of 49 (9511 views)

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Re: [Peter] Pedestrian Friendly?

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My experience has been summer is relatively cool at these latitudes even on the coast, relatively being the key word in regards the coast, the hottest months being spring. Colima is still on my list of places to visit, inland a bit but still relatively low altitude. Is the climate sort of like Tepic?


The hottest times on the coast are the summer and early fall months. Spring is usually pleasant, the nights are still nice for sleeping. The humidity is at its lowest in the months preceding the rainy season. Once it begins to rain, usually not much in June but from July onward, the humidity obviously rises and the temps along with it. The nights stay warm and it is hard to get a good night's sleep.


robbers

Dec 18, 2009, 5:23 PM

Post #41 of 49 (9475 views)

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Re: [Papirex] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Rex, as a person who has been to Cuernavaca three times and is considering retirement there, I always appreciate your posts. Thanks. I do wish, however, that there were additional folks there who'd be willing to add their thoughts. It's always interesting to get several different perspectives. Anyway, Rex, thanks again.


(This post was edited by robbers on Dec 18, 2009, 5:23 PM)


Linda in Morelia

Dec 18, 2009, 7:15 PM

Post #42 of 49 (9458 views)

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Re: [Peter] Pedestrian Friendly?

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I have heard more than one expat here in Morelia say what Peter said, "we don't encourage people to stay." As a resident expat of Morelia, I would like to say that I would encourage more expats to come and live here. We are not in any danger of being dominated by expats, and I think it would make it more interesting for those of us who live here.

Generally, I don't think we should assume that all folks in a similar situation, e.g., expats in Morelia, feel the same way and should avoid using "we" feel this or think that.


Papirex


Dec 18, 2009, 8:32 PM

Post #43 of 49 (9445 views)

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Re: [robbers] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Robbers, for information about Cuernavaca here are a couple of sites you may want to visit:
http://www.clickoncuernavaca.com/ There is no message board anymore,but there is sometimes some great information there. I just found my super Canadian Dentista there a couple of months ago. She speaks English, Spanish, French, and German. My wife says she speaks Spanish like she was born here. She is noted for her painless drilling and she is a specialist in dental implants. It is nice to be able to say Owch! In English without suffering while I think of the proper words in Spanish. She has never hurt me yet, no fun, but painless.


There is also a link to The Newcomers Club, a small group of English speakers here. I am not a member, but we did enjoy a delicious Thanksgiving turkey dinner with them this year. Maybe I will end up joining.


Another site is: http://groups.yahoo.com/...uernAds/messages?o=1 It is a Yahoo group, you may read all posts but you must register (free) to answer any post or to make a new post. The Yahoo Groups have a much different format than most message boards. If you reply to a post, it goes directly to the original poster as an email, and no one else may see it. If you want all members to see it, you must make your reply as a new post. It takes a little getting used to.


The only problem is that a lot of the posters live in a little hick village named Tepoztlan. It is about 20 miles from Cuernavaca up in the hills and they seldom mention where they are talking about and it is often confusing. When we first moved to Cuernavaca, Tepoztlan was the kidnapping capitol of Morelos State. The victims were almost always murdered and their bodies were never found, whether a ransom was paid or not. It was a no brainer to not live in Tepoztlan in those days. I often wonder how many ex-pats up there may have bought a house with a body or three buried in the back patio.


Good luck, Rex
"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo


Oscar2

Dec 18, 2009, 10:41 PM

Post #44 of 49 (9430 views)

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Re: [Peter] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Peter,

Your posts about your daily life in Morelia have been well said, informative and enjoyed. I too, not only found the wide flat sidewalks pedestrian friendly but the tallness of El Centro Historico possessed a character unlike others which seemingly opened up so many possibilities. For me, it’s old towering existence somehow possessed a mysterious theme which had me looking in just about every doorway to see what secrets laid behind these tall impressive fortress like structures. When the wife and I would walk each day she’d get impatient with me for not keeping up her ardent pace. I’d heed her by saying, in your haste your missing what little secrets lie behind each opening, each door and portal. In retrospect, Morelia is a very clean city why, because there is an obvious absents of Advertising banners, hanging on walls and doorways. So, the small signs over or to the side of the doorways or canopy’s say it all. I am not a fluent reader of Spanish, so I’d goggle, pause and just stare trying to figure out just what was hidden behind those portals, doors and entryways.

I found a nondescript Chinese restaurant, which are rare and a treasure in my book, especially if the food is delicious. We walked into this new hotel/coffee house which had a decor type ambiance of dark polished straight back wooden chairs with cushioned moron pads and a complementary same colored bar and stools. We sat at the bar, and this very almost European exotic young woman, slight and beautiful with a subtle manor born of intelligence greeted us with a gentle smile I still remember. Her thin careful hands demonstrated the various types of coffee she would make fresh for us and also purred over the strengths she had available.

While sipping this delicious coffee, her conversation intentionally allowed her to spread the confidence of her beautiful thin, high cheekbone face with an aquiline nose and skin with a softness and color of milk. She spoke of her Spanish/European background, and the many of her Colombian origin resembled her stunning appearance. She and the coffee were a treat and it was only two blocks from my hotel…… Please don’t get me wrong, I love my wife of 37 years but I also love good food, music, beautiful woman, exotic islands and more….. don’t we all…

I am not one to habitually eat in upscale restaurants, nor expensive meals, on the contrary, my self proclaimed nutritionist, my wife, has taught me well to eat most of my meals in light portions and cut the grease. But like the naughty one I can be, I love Mexican food and good tacos al pastor. They are inexpensive and I found a treasure of a place close by in El Centro and we’ll talk about that next…..


Peter


Dec 19, 2009, 5:37 AM

Post #45 of 49 (9412 views)

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Re: [Linda in Morelia] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Hi Linda. I'm usually careful to generalize my statements like that. You've heard "more than one" along with myself say such and that makes a "we" if not an all-inclusive "we" which I never mean to infer, but I'll try to be more careful to make the obvious more obvious that I do not speak for everyone. Generally, I don't think we should assume that all folks in a similar situation feel the same way either.

"As a resident expat of Morelia, I would like to say that I would encourage more expats to come and live here. We are not in any danger of being dominated by expats, and I think it would make it more interesting for those of us who live here."

I wish it were that easy. I do not forsee Morelia ever being dominated by expats, but at present our small expat gathering is being dominated by one newcomer's incessant chatter which is driving away several of our old friends who are now finding difficulty enjoying this weekly social hour and have stopped coming. I miss them but I understand their reasoning, if it's no longer enjoyable don't do it.

So the group, who up till now has welcomed everyone with open arms, is faced with having to deal with the situation and perhaps become somewhat exclusive, or watching it all go down in flames as the group loses interest and falls apart. Our numbers are not that great that the loss of just three regular attendees is not significant. Friendships have been made there that will likely continue without the group, but if the present situation continues there will be no group to accord new acquaintances.

I felt the inquirer of this thread might find something here he was seeking and spoke up when I generally picked up a good feeling from him through his inquiry. I didn't do so lightly, being mindful of this minor crisis amidst our ranks. One can feel quite secure living here in these brick houses amongst our gracious hosts, but to an extent it's a bit of a house of cards for expats living anywhere, IMHO.


esperanza

Dec 19, 2009, 7:10 AM

Post #46 of 49 (9392 views)

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Re: [Peter] Pedestrian Friendly?

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I think that when both Linda and Peter write here about how few expatriates there are in Morelia, they must mean that there are few native English-speaking expatriates. In fact, Morelia is home to hundreds, if not thousands, of expatriates from many countries throughout the world. Our city has six or more excellent universities and is home to the oldest music conservatory in the New World, a symphony orchestra, and a chamber orchestra. Professors and musicians from the world over live, teach and perform here. Businesspeople from many other countries live and work here.

What Morelia does not have is a large community of retired native English-speaking expatriates.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









(This post was edited by esperanza on Dec 19, 2009, 7:11 AM)


Peter


Dec 19, 2009, 7:42 AM

Post #47 of 49 (9383 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Pedestrian Friendly?

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I think that when both Linda and Peter write here about how few expatriates there are in Morelia, they must mean that there are few native English-speaking expatriates. In fact, Morelia is home to hundreds, if not thousands, of expatriates from many countries throughout the world. Our city has six or more excellent universities and is home to the oldest music conservatory in the New World, a symphony orchestra, and a chamber orchestra. Professors and musicians from the world over live, teach and perform here. Businesspeople from many other countries live and work here.

What Morelia does not have is a large community of retired native English-speaking expatriates.

I'm quite sure there are hundreds, if not over a thousand or more English-speaking American and Canadian expats living in and around Morelia. Our little group that gathers regularly is just a handful though. I have no idea the number of expats here from throughout the world, but waiting in line for the orchestra performances there are certainly more languages than English and Spanish being spoken.


esperanza

Dec 19, 2009, 8:31 AM

Post #48 of 49 (9375 views)

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Re: [Peter] Pedestrian Friendly?

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I think the number of native English-speaking expatriates in Morelia is probably around 250-300. I suspect that there are more who live in and around Pátzcuaro.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









mazbook1


Dec 19, 2009, 11:11 AM

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Re: [Papirex] Pedestrian Friendly?

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Rex, Maybe, just maybe, the Yahoogroups were as you say in the distant past, but today they work a little more like a normal forum, especially if you read them online and specify "Group by topic". The average member receives every post made to the forum in their email (that's the default), new topic or not unless the poster has written it specifically as a private message. Actually, it's a little non-instinctive the way you have to do a private message and often folk's private messages end up as quite public postings on the forum.

I would say that there are pluses and minuses to the Yahoogroups format and for some it's better and for some it's worse than the more ordinary style format used here on MexConnect. Since I read and respond online, both work about the same for me.

Sorry about hijacking this very interesting thread, but I felt it was necessary to correct your information about Yahoogroups. It is by far the easiest, quickest method to get a local discussion forum/group off the ground.
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