Mexico Connect
Forums  > General > General Forum
First page Previous page 1 2 3 4 Next page Last page  View All


Peter


Oct 30, 2009, 10:07 AM

Post #51 of 83 (10892 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Manuel Dexterity] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply

In Reply To

In Reply To

I also agree that many many Americans and Canadians share an underlying racism that prohibits them from accepting both Mexico and Mexicans as their equal.

...we would socialize some with foreigners but after hearing countless comments with racial or bigoted undertones we simply stopped accepting invitations to gringo gatherings. They weren't like you say, vitriolic racist statements but tidbits here and there that revealed their true opinions of this country and its people.

The same goes for many people on these boards. And the sad part is they just don't get it.



I've heard the comments all my life, from both sides of the house. I grew up in the 50's - 60's California, a time and place where the racial barriers were coming down much quicker than in other times and places across the country, but it was not a perfect process, it takes time.

Fact is, we are not all culturally equal. There are probably no two bordering countries around the world more culturally different than Mexico and the US. Neither has exclusive claim to the high road, we're different is all. It also would be an injustice to claim the differences do not exist or merely try to ignore them.

My friends and I here in Morelia often have a little fun pointing out our differences, and we've all become a bit more culturally aware in taking notice and making light of these. For most of them they have had little or no contact with 'gringos' before and consider me quite a novelty and are not overly sensitive with my lapses or parts of my cultural background they do not understand - There really are a number of things, such as the way English-speakers phrase things that would violate normal protocol, that might cause tension if there was not a mutual curiosity that bonds us.

It's not a perfect process, I love my adopted country and my friends sense this. None of us benefit from being too sensitive. We often discover how much alike we are when we are exploring our differences. All of us are a bit different than we were before we met. I think we are all pleased with the changes.

Or it could be that I just don't get it, which would be sad.


(This post was edited by Peter on Oct 30, 2009, 10:10 AM)


richmx2


Oct 30, 2009, 11:20 AM

Post #52 of 83 (10867 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Carron] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Chiapas is an anomaly within Mexico (Mayan, historically and culturally more Guatemala than Mexico, etc.) and is the exception to the rule -- which is not to deny that discrimination doesn't exist. There was in the Mayan region legal discrimination against Mayans until after the Revolution, and the "usos y costumbres" of 500 years are not going to disappear within a few generations.

Consider the way some people North of the Border still are hung up on the fact that the country elected a non-white President, and even those who support the man find it remarkable. Considering Mexico has had Afro-Mexican and Indigenous (and part-indigenous) Presidents throughout it's history here one asks, "what took them so long?".

There has never been any taboo against what we call by the negative word,"miscegenation", and for which the Mexicans use the value-neutral term "mestiaje". To be considered "indigenous" after all is more a matter of lifestyle and language than bloodlines. As it is, "indigenous" is defined in the Constitution as an "ethno-linguistic" matter: in other words, if you stay home speaking Zapotec you're indigenous... if you move to the city, speak Spanish you probably aren't.

I got a negative lesson in this one afternoon on the Mexico City Metro when a blue-eyed, blonde drunk lost bowel control -- grossing everyone out -- and was called a "sucio indio" by a dark-skinned, roman-nosed, short and very proper Chilango. The point being that "indio" (not a term normally used in polite conversation except by the most reactionary of nacos) and stereotyped indigenous BEHAVIOR is what people object to. I think there's a reason beyond his political and historical importance that Benito Juarez is a central figure in Mexican thought.... born an "indian" he became Mexican.

Not to say that there is not color prejudice in Mexico or Latin America, but that WE -- coming from societies that made "race" central to our way of thinking about people -- see "race" where Latin Americans often see something else. Physical appearance does indicate family, of course, and -- much as north of the border one assumes brown skinned people are "foreigners" and black-skinned ones came from a less-wealthy background -- there is an assumption that the more dark skinned and short and "indian" one looks, the more likely one came from a rural, uneducated, family.

The alleged "white" control of the economy and politics is partially due just to the fact that people tend to find their life partners, and pass on their economic control (as well as their DNA) among their own social class. If anything, the Revolution led to an INCREASE in Europeans at the wealthy end of the social spectrum, having made Mexico a refuge for European capital and people in the 1930s and 40s. Look at their grandchildren, though, and they look and act pretty much like any other spoiled rich Mexican kid.


None of which says anything about foreigners bragging about "getting away with something" here. Not that I haven't used my "gringo pass" on occasion, and not that I haven't occasionally bought an officer of the law a refresco to simplify legal procedures, but it's not something I would take pride in, nor in any way would consider honorable behavior. And certainly not something I'd defend on the grounds that "everybody does it".


http://mexfiles.net
http://mexicobookpublishers.com


mazbook1


Oct 30, 2009, 1:18 PM

Post #53 of 83 (10844 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [esperanza] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
"I could cite another dozen remarks just like that, but those will suffice. This type racism and prejudice hasn't died off at all."

esperanza,

After posting what I did, I had a long discussion with my wife about the subject. She has lived in different places in México (not the far south, though) and is pretty "up" on these sorts of questions. According to her, the predjudice you describe in your quotes definitely does exist still, but does vary with locale. She says that Mazatlán is very much in the lower tier NOW, and that Sinaloa and particularly Los Mochis in the north of the state where she has family are, of all the areas where she has lived, probably the lowest in this sort of predjudice, in her opinion. She did agree with me that with the growth of the educated class (regardless of skin color or family background), there has been a noticeable decrease in this sort of predjudice here in Sinaloa, but she doubted it had had much effect in many places in the country where she had lived. She reminded me that some nightclubs here used to ban any [dark-skinned] person wearing huaraches and even had signs posted that this was their policy, but that now most of those clubs were out of business and their successors no longer obviously had the same policy.

I guess I should have said where I live and not made my post appear that I was speaking for all of México. ¡Discúlpeme, por favor! Being on this forum is definitely a learning experience for me, as I "lit and set" here in Mazatlán and—as a resident and citizen of México—have traveled very little in México. I don't count the many, many years as a tourist, since tourists, no matter how knowledgeable, are [totally] clueless about the real culture of the country and the underlying attitudes and predjudices.


db52

Oct 30, 2009, 7:54 PM

Post #54 of 83 (10798 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [esperanza] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
I've started reading this thread rather late so I'm sorry my reply is not more timely, but I just want to ask about the 'racism' implicit in the statement about the sweet 'little woman" who runs the corner store. As it happens, my landlady and I were talking a couple of weeks ago and somehow, in the course of conversation, she referred to the lady who runs the corner store(!) near the hotel I was staying in. The landlady had, in fact, said something complimentary about the store owner, and, just to make sure we were talking about the same person, I asked "La gorda?"

So, my question--was this racist of me? Why or why not?

And let's talk about "if only they weren't so backward." When I notice a whole lot of people wearing New York Yankee baseball caps and then I say "They sure do seem to like the Yankees around these parts," is this a racist comment on my part?

I'll concede that calling a people "backward" is, as a general proposition, not exactly a compliment...but, on the other hand...lack of indoor plumbing, pedal-operated sewing machines, and Coca-Cola made with real sugar are all things that are pretty much out-of-date rarities NOB, don't you agree?

I just don't see the racism here, I guess, is what I'm trying to say.


Axixic


Oct 30, 2009, 8:23 PM

Post #55 of 83 (10789 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Gringal] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply

In Reply To
...and there is a reason why it takes 400 times as many personnel to protect President Obama as it did to protect President Bush.

...and then there's the prejudice of Mexicans against Mexicans with lower status or darker skin.

...and all the other mindless and cruel treatment of one segment of mankind against another. Is this just the human condition: trying to make the "other" less in order to feel "more"?


Instead of the picture of Zeus that was borrowed to illustrate what Jesus was supposed to look like, if someone painted a reasonable representation of what Jesus really looked like, it would either cause a lot of racist people not believe in Jesus or convince them that their prejudice is wrong. Jesus was reported as being short which back them meant he was under 5'. He was stocky, very dark, thick nose, short kinky hair. It was against the law of Moses for a man's hair to touch his shoulders. If Jesus appeared today as he was 2000 years ago, he would be hated by many people because of his dark complexion and stature and not judged by who he is. Even 2000 years ago a fair complexion and height was more valuable than character.


Brian

Oct 31, 2009, 5:19 AM

Post #56 of 83 (10739 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [esperanza] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
 
esperanza, you initially wrote: "I'm assuming that most if not all of us who use Mexconnect are generally law abiding citizens. Whether we are native-born Mexicans, naturalized Mexican citizens, foreign residents of Mexico, or residents of other countries who have an abiding interest in Mexico, we're not confirmed law-breakers."

By now you have perhaps had the opportunity to read the opinion piece in Milenio that goes to the heart of the problem. In a nutshell, it says that people follow laws because of fear of punishment. Unfortunately, as we all know, the Mexican justice system is in such a state that lawbreakers can act with impunity because the chance of being caught, much less convicted, is statistically very unlikely. According to the author, Mexican society is overrun by people who do whatever they can get away with and, while acknowledging that there are some highly evolved folks who base therir actions on moral values, Mexico is basically a jungle dominated by disobedient, quick tempered and irresponsible individuals. Calderon cannot change this. Only the Mexicans can change themselves. Those are his words, not mine.

http://impreso.milenio.com/node/8664651

Brian


richmx2


Oct 31, 2009, 12:55 PM

Post #57 of 83 (10669 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [PamelaDelafield] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
HUH???

"It was against the law for a man's hair to touch his shoulders"... when and where? Graphic evidence from every era of Mexico includes men and women with long hair. I have never seen or heard mention of any legal proscription on hair length, though there may have been some local ordinance somewhere at some time... or missionaries somewhere at some time... may have forced some group somewhere to cut their hair in a different fashion, and I know the Army makes you cut your hair (the barbers across from Campo Militar #1 at Cuarto Caminos Metro do a thriving business in "cortes militares") -- but where did you come up with this?

Not to belabor a relatively unimportant piece of historical trivia, but this illustrates the problem most of us have when dealing with the "other". Coming from a culture in which "race" is central to our thinking about people, we create evidence of our own obsessions even where none exists.

And, a good number of us being familiar ONLY with the United States and/or Canada, assume that anything done in Mexico differently than at home is either "inferior" or somehow unique... forgetting the four percent of the planet's population living north of the Rio Grande River/Rio Bravo del Norte has its' unique ways of doing things too.


http://mexfiles.net
http://mexicobookpublishers.com


arbon

Oct 31, 2009, 1:12 PM

Post #58 of 83 (10667 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [richmx2] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  |

In Reply To
HUH???

"It was against the law for a man's hair to touch his shoulders"... when and where? Graphic evidence from every era of Mexico includes men and women with long hair. I have never seen or heard mention of any legal proscription on hair length, though there may have been some local ordinance somewhere at some time... or missionaries somewhere at some time... may have forced some group somewhere to cut their hair in a different fashion, and I know the Army makes you cut your hair (the barbers across from Campo Militar #1 at Cuarto Caminos Metro do a thriving business in "cortes militares") -- but where did you come up with this?

Not to belabor a relatively unimportant piece of historical trivia, but this illustrates the problem most of us have when dealing with the "other". Coming from a culture in which "race" is central to our thinking about people, we create evidence of our own obsessions even where none exists.

And, a good number of us being familiar ONLY with the United States and/or Canada, assume that anything done in Mexico differently than at home is either "inferior" or somehow unique... forgetting the four percent of the planet's population living north of the Rio Grande River/Rio Bravo del Norte has its' unique ways of doing things too. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Yes I could see what you mean, if "Moses" had been Mexican.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Zarcero

Oct 31, 2009, 2:21 PM

Post #59 of 83 (10650 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Carron] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Well let me ask you this: How many of you expat Gringos living in Mexico socialize with Mexicans of equal wealth and/or social status in the towns that you reside in?


wendy devlin

Oct 31, 2009, 2:26 PM

Post #60 of 83 (10647 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Zacero, now, that's what I call, a nitty-gritty type of question. (where's that pop-corn smiley, when you need it:)


arbon

Oct 31, 2009, 3:13 PM

Post #61 of 83 (10637 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  |

In Reply To
Well let me ask you this: How many of you expat Gringos living in Mexico socialize with Mexicans of equal wealth and/or social status in the towns that you reside in? ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Well that should put the cat amongst the pigeons.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



tashby


Oct 31, 2009, 4:02 PM

Post #62 of 83 (10617 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Well, yesterday my partner and I had lunch with a Mexican friend who I would consider, ummmmmm, how did you put it....."of equal wealth and/or social status". Actually, he almost certainly has more money than we do. But I'm a better dancer so I figure that makes us even, socially.

Anyway, the interesting part happened after lunch. We stopped at another business on the way back, and while I was taking care of my thing, I overheard a conversation between my friend the Mexican businessman, and the other business owner who is also from North America, but not from Mexico. (Whew.) They are in different, but not entirely unrelated, businesses.

So they were just checking in with each other, owner to owner, to see how things were going business-wise:

FRIEND: Yeah, it's been a little slow, but things might be picking up....
OTHER: Yeah, I think we're going to have a decent winter.....maybe not all of Mexico, but our area....
FRIEND: Maybe, but if the tax increase goes into effect...
OTHER: Won't hurt us. We fly as far under the radar as possible....I don't even know how to pronounce the word "IVA". Hahahahahaha!

Now, this "other" person does not run what I would call a small business. It's not a restaurant or bookstore or retail place. Large chunks of money move through his outfit. Large chunks. And, obviously, he's not talking about smoothing his way out of a traffic ticket....or sneaking across the border with a brand new TV hiding inside an old box.

He also proudly pointed to a giant house he was building for himself very nearby.

The part that amazed me most, in hindsight, is just how wildly vocal and open he was about it.

Well look at that. Back on topic.


(This post was edited by tashby on Oct 31, 2009, 5:02 PM)


arbon

Oct 31, 2009, 6:11 PM

Post #63 of 83 (10584 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [tashby] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  |
Not even close.

http://www.lausd.k12.ca.us/...es/SmileyPopcorn.gif
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~



Peter


Nov 1, 2009, 12:15 AM

Post #64 of 83 (10528 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply

In Reply To
Well let me ask you this: How many of you expat Gringos living in Mexico socialize with Mexicans of equal wealth and/or social status in the towns that you reside in?


It seems an odd question, but myself for one. Those closest to me are of about equal wealth and status, and among my friends and acquaintances here they run the gamut from being much more affluent to dirt poor, with titles and without. And the same could be said for my neighbors in both the colonias where I have homes, the poor side-by-side with the more affluent, my closest friends (about three different families) also having multiple homes here in the same city, Morelia.

You have me wondering what you are getting at with that question. Is my situation not the norm? I have been here several years but only just recently met other ex-pats, none of which I see outside a weekly social hour that I have been attending for about two or three months now.


La Isla


Nov 1, 2009, 7:56 AM

Post #65 of 83 (10485 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply

In Reply To
Well let me ask you this: How many of you expat Gringos living in Mexico socialize with Mexicans of equal wealth and/or social status in the towns that you reside in?


I don´t understand what you´re getting at with this question, but I´ll answer it anyway. I would say that the Mexicans I consider to be friends are similar in social status to my own, middle-class with enough money to live comfortably but not much more than that!


esperanza

Nov 1, 2009, 10:20 AM

Post #66 of 83 (10459 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Judy and I do. Our friends are about 50/50 Mexican and expat. Last night we attended a party attended predominantly by Mexicans, hosted by a bi-cultural expat friend and his Mexican husband. Yes, his Mexican husband.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









gpkgto

Nov 1, 2009, 10:39 AM

Post #67 of 83 (10450 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
We are usually the only gringos at any gathering of our friends--either at our house or theirs. We had a birthday party at our house with 35 people--all Mexican except us. Most are professionals or business people, but we have a few unemployed friends (sadly for them).


mazbook1


Nov 1, 2009, 11:12 AM

Post #68 of 83 (10442 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Zarcero, Let me make a few comments here and then rephrase your question.

I would be willing to bet that MOST of the gringos on this forum who socialize with Mexicans of ANY income or social status are married to or partnered with a Mexican and speak a bit (or a lot) of Spanish—not just the tourist variety. The biggest tope on the way to actually integrating into Mexican society is your internal clock. If you can't change it from the breakfast somewhere around 7-8 AM, lunch between 11 AM-1 PM and the big meal of the day, supper/dinner somewhere around 5-7 PM, and then change your going-to-bed time from más o menos 10 PM to ¡whatever!, you will have a tough [nearly impossible] time integrating. Those of us with Mexican partners quickly learn that all of the foregoing is necessary and MAKE the changes in our lifestyle. It's pretty difficult to have a mixed expat - Mexican party when the Mexican component is just arriving as the expat component is leaving!

Now I'll rephrase Zarcero's question and pose it again: "Well let me ask you this: How many of you expat Gringos living in Mexico socialize with Mexicans of equal wealth and/or social status in the towns that you reside in?"

What I would ask is: "Well let me ask you this: How many of you expat Gringos, who don't speak reasonably conversational Spanish and/or don't have a Mexican partner, and who live in México, socialize with Mexicans of equal wealth and/or social status in the towns that you reside in?"

My bet is very few do, and those who do socialize only with Mexicans of equal wealth and/or social status who speak English, thus getting a rather narrow view of Mexican culture.

Definitely the ones, particularly the couples, who can answer MY question in the affirmative deserve KUDOS!


(This post was edited by mazbook1 on Nov 1, 2009, 11:25 AM)


Zarcero

Nov 1, 2009, 11:30 AM

Post #69 of 83 (10418 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [mazbook1] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
mazbook1,

Good answer, but not for rephrasing my question. Learning the language and resetting the clock is part of the equation. Therefore no excuses.

My experience is that most US expats around the world "ghetto" themselves. And even if they did not, they lack the skills to acquire what is needed to be accepted by the local society of the host nation.


(This post was edited by Zarcero on Nov 1, 2009, 11:31 AM)


La Isla


Nov 1, 2009, 11:31 AM

Post #70 of 83 (10413 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [mazbook1] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply

In Reply To



Quote
I would be willing to bet that MOST of the gringos on this forum who socialize with Mexicans of ANY income or social status are married to or partnered with a Mexican and speak a bit (or a lot) of Spanish—not just the tourist variety. The biggest tope on the way to actually integrating into Mexican society is your internal clock. If you can't change it from the breakfast somewhere around 7-8 AM, lunch between 11 AM-1 PM and the big meal of the day, supper/dinner somewhere around 5-7 PM, and then change your going-to-bed time from más o menos 10 PM to ¡whatever!, you will have a tough [nearly impossible] time integrating.


These are excellent points. I'm not married to or partnered with a Mexican but do speak Spanish well, and I have Mexican friends I socialize with. I hqave have changed my eating patterns. Since I don't cook much, I usually have my big meal of the day sometime between 2 and 4 pm, mostly to take advantage of the comida corridas offered at the little restaurants in my neighborhood. The same was true when I lived in Spain, where the eating hours are similar.


Hound Dog

Nov 1, 2009, 11:48 AM

Post #71 of 83 (10415 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [bournemouth] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Time to get over yourself Bubba - you spend way too much time blaming people for doing things that others might deem helpful. I note that you did not stay in California or anywhere of your other haunts in the US - why not?

Well, Bridget, if I may call you that since you persist in calling The Dawg "Bubba", how is it that you noted that Dawg "...did not stay in California or anywhere of (sic) your other haunts in the U.S....."

Dawg Bubba is 67 years old and (just to respond to your snide remark) will tell you that I spent 24 of those years resident in my hometown of Greenville, Alabama or at University in Tuscaloosa, one year in Washington, DC, 33 years in California primarily in San Francisco and environs and so far nine years in Ajijic and San Cristóbal de Las Casas Mexico. Now, I must admit that off-and on during those years I did drift about in Europe, Africa, the Middle East and India for an aggregate amount of about two years as a backpacker smoking dope and having an immense amount of fun but that was in the 1960s and I fail to see how such a stable life´s journey could define one as a vagabond or malcontent as you implied in your indirect British manner not untypical of many of your ethnic and cultural origin trained to address every issue obliquely .

Now, since you have illicited that information from me by insinuating that I have spent my life one step in front of the sheriff, why don´t you tell us where you spent your life and why you had to leave whatever place from which you came and settle for Lakeside as a place to sit out your declining years.

I try to refrain from ad hominem insults and perhaps you should as well. Rather, my insults have historically been aimed at what I considered imbecilic chatter. These forums are meant to be both infomative and amusing. Let´s keep it that way


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on Nov 1, 2009, 12:06 PM)


mazbook1


Nov 1, 2009, 11:48 AM

Post #72 of 83 (10412 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Zarcero, The expats who don't reset their clock and don't learn more than a little bit of tourist Spanish, automatically "ghettoize" themselves. Unfortunately, they are the majority of gringo expats in México. I feel sorry for them, but I sure don't socialize with them.


Gringal

Nov 1, 2009, 12:11 PM

Post #73 of 83 (10394 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Zarcero] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Re people "ghettoizing" themselves in nearly every first generation expat situation, you just hit the core of the matter. I agree.

Look at the history of the U.S., as an example. First generation......clung on to the native country's ways and for many, the language. Second and third generation.....integration into the host society.

Added to that, many of the people who move here permanently are older. Much older than the folks who emigrated to the U.S. back when. Learning conversational Spanish and re-setting their "internal clocks" is more difficult. I fail to see why they should be expected to.

I believe we should be respectful of our host country's culture and its people in every way we can. The Golden Rule should suffice for those in their Golden years. If we can't start partying at midnight after a lifetime of going to work at 8 a.m., we needn't hang our heads. The Mexicans are okay, and so are we. Just different strokes.


bournemouth

Nov 1, 2009, 12:35 PM

Post #74 of 83 (10383 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Hound Dog] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
If you think I was insinuating that you moved one step in front of the sheriff, then your imagination is running wild. As "the Dawg" was Bubba for years before he became "The Dawg" and that's what he was when I first encountered him, I remember that name better - I won't say with affection - but that is the name I remember - but if you prefer to be called Bob rather than any of your other pen names, then let us all know.


Hound Dog

Nov 1, 2009, 12:40 PM

Post #75 of 83 (10374 views)

Shortcut

    

Re: [Gringal] Questions and Concerns about Foreigners in Mexico

  | Private Reply
Well put, Gringal but here is an aside.

Why is it that foreigners inclined to post hereabouts spend so much time lamenting their awkward inability to conform to local norms? The eclectic nature of a town or region is its spice. Imagine, for instance, living in the state of Michoacan which includes the somewhat cosmopolitan city of Morelia, the architecturally stunning but backwater historic town of Pátzcuaro, the rough hewn but tropically intriguing Uruápan and a primitive interior between these places and the coast emulating the movie Deliverence - a violent and challenging and uninviting place of suspicious backwater villages and isolated incestuous enclaves.

I don´t know of any expatriate community more self-effacing than that comprised of American immigrants in Mexico constantly questioning their inability to meld into the local community which, I daresay, they mght or might not find an inviting milieu once they arrived.

I never heard any Yankee immigrant sumbitches in South Alabama lamenting their inability to meld into the rough-and-tumble backwoods society of my homestate and I, by God, would not give you two cents to live in a shotgun house filled with inbred morons out in the piney woods eating possum and squirrel and drinking moonshine to survive but tell me the difference between that environment and a redneck environment in Mexico or France and if you convince me of that difference I´ll kiss your butt in the zocalo and give you twenty minutes to draw a crowd.


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on Nov 1, 2009, 12:54 PM)
First page Previous page 1 2 3 4 Next page Last page  View All
 
 
Search for (advanced search) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.4