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shoe


Sep 21, 2009, 9:00 AM

Post #1 of 9 (5656 views)

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Hito

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Is this word used in Mexico?

I find in the dictionary taht it means milestone, landmark, signpost and the like.

My Mexican gf never hear of the work so it might be only used in Spain.

cya,
shoe

Nothing is intrinsically good or evil, but its manner of usage may make it so.
-St. Thomas Aquinas



BrentB

Sep 22, 2009, 10:37 AM

Post #2 of 9 (5617 views)

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Re: [shoe] Hito

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Recently was featured on dic.com spainish word of the day. Neither my wife nor co-workers have knowledge of use of this word in the Americas. It may be used among some highly educated people or, most likely in Spain.

Now "hijito" is another case altogether.

brent


tashby


Sep 22, 2009, 7:37 PM

Post #3 of 9 (5597 views)

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Re: [BrentB] Hito

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Ha!

I saw it on "word of the day" too. And I immediately questioned whether or not to burn even half a brain cell trying to memorize/remember it.


BrentB

Sep 22, 2009, 9:00 PM

Post #4 of 9 (5585 views)

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Re: [tashby] Hito

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Yes, one wants to learn to communicate, not learn words that only a professor might know.

brent

PS getting the word of the day sent to you is a good learning tool. It gets you thinking.


jerezano

Sep 24, 2009, 8:33 PM

Post #5 of 9 (5539 views)

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Re: [BrentB] Hito

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Hello all,

Here is the definition of hito, hita from the Royal Academia Española dictionary. Please note that it means a lot of things more than just a milepost or marker. Used for many things. Probably a good word to remember.
Translations are my own and may be approximations.

hito, ta.

(Del lat. fictus, part. pas. de figere, clavar, fijar). From the latin, past participle of Figere[fix], clavar[nail], fijar [locate in place]

1. adj. desus. Unido, inmediato. Unused adjective meaning united, immediate.

2. adj. desus. firme (? estable). Unused adjective meaning firm or stable.

3. adj. ant. Se decía de la persona importuna o pesada en insistir o pedir. Said of the person begging or insistent or demanding.

4. adj. ant. Se decía del caballo negro, sin mancha ni pelo de otro color. Said of the black horse, without marks of another color.

5. m. Mojón o poste de piedra, por lo común labrada, que sirve para indicar la dirección o la distancia en los caminos o para delimitar terrenos. Milepost or kilometer post or boundary marker.

6. m. Persona, cosa o hecho clave y fundamental dentro de un ámbito o contexto. Person, thing, or deed key and fundamental within an ambient or context.

7. m. Juego que consiste en fijar en la tierra un clavo y tirarle herrones o tejos. A game which consists of puting a nail[post] in the ground and throwing God only knows what. What are herrones and tajos?

8. m. Blanco o punto adonde se dirige la vista o puntería para acertar el tiro. Target on a rifle range.

9. f. Clavo pequeño sin cabeza, que se queda embutido totalmente en la pieza que asegura. Headles nail which is driven completely into its place.

10. f. hito (? mojón). Apparently sometimes used for a border or boundary marker

a hito.

1. loc. adv. Fijamente, seguidamente o con permanencia en un lugar. Fixedly, securely, permanently.

dar en el ~.

1. loc. verb. Comprender o acertar el punto de la dificultad. Understand the point of the discussion or problem.

jugar alguien a dos hitos. He/she is Two-faced? Hypocrite? A double agent?

1. loc. verb. coloq. jugar con dos barajas. Play with two decks of cards. Double dealer.

mirar de hito, o de hito en hito. Look[examine] at the point, or from point to point.

1. locs. verbs. Fijar la vista en un objeto sin distraerla a otra parte. Look at a point without losing the big picture

mirar en hito. Look at the point.

1. loc. verb. mirar de hito en hito. Look from point to point.

mudar de hito. Move the point

1. loc. verb. coloq. Variar los medios para la consecución de algo.Commonly used for changing the order of something

tener alguien la suya sobre el ~. To gain the point

1. loc. verb. coloq. No darse por vencido. Commonly used for not giving up.

Hasta pronto, jerezano.


sergiogomez / Moderator

Oct 4, 2009, 1:04 PM

Post #6 of 9 (5455 views)

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Re: [shoe] Hito

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I don't remember having used it myself or hearing anyone else use it. Then again it could be one of those words that only comes up in conversation once every 75 years. Then one day, some Mexican gets particularly creative and pulls a word like this out of the cobwebs. I have noticed that a couple times, where someone will actually use a word that I came across eons ago while reading my bilingual dictionary. If you asked me what those words are, I couldn't tell you, because I've only heard them once.


mcm

Oct 6, 2009, 11:40 AM

Post #7 of 9 (5414 views)

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Re: [shoe] Hito

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Coincidentally, the day after I read the original post, I noticed "Hito" used in a headline (in the Diario de Yucatan) -- it was used to indicate "milestone" in the figurative sense -- in this case, the conferring of the first graduate degree in law from a local University. I did a quick search of the paper, and came up with a bunch of other articles that had used "hito" also to indicate a figurative milestone or a "first".
So, it may be a word used more in written than spoken communication, but it does seem to be used fairly frequently (at least here in Yucatan -- I found it used in 15 different articles during the month of September).


esperanza

Oct 6, 2009, 12:19 PM

Post #8 of 9 (5409 views)

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Re: [mcm] Hito

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Mexican journalese (newspaper language) often features words that are perfectly well known but little used in conversation. Hito is an excellent example.




http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









sergiogomez / Moderator

Oct 15, 2009, 10:00 PM

Post #9 of 9 (5340 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Hito

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In Reply To
Mexican journalese (newspaper language) often features words that are perfectly well known but little used in conversation. Hito is an excellent example.

Yep.
 
 
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