Mexico Connect
Forums  > General > Living, Working, Retiring
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All


La Isla


Oct 3, 2009, 4:04 PM

Post #26 of 39 (8994 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Starcradle] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply

In Reply To

Quote
Of course, if you marry in Mexico the husband is entitled to establish a casa chica.


I had never heard of this, gpkisner. Would you please elaborate?


I'm sure this is just gpkisnerŽs little joke, but IŽll let him explain it to you! (Of course, the phenomenon of the "casa chica" is well known to me and most people who've spent any time in Mexico.)


gpkgto

Oct 4, 2009, 11:24 AM

Post #27 of 39 (8940 views)

Shortcut

Re: [La Isla] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
Thanks La Isla--I thought no one had a sense of humor here anymore!

Of course it was a joke--but a reality in some cases. It means the husband maintains his mistress (and sometimes children) in a separate house--a "casa chica". There is a famous pair of houses on Calle Reloj in San Miguel where the man kept his wife on one side of the street and the mistress on the other. He was very wealthy and both houses were/are very nice (the wife's house is now an apartment building).


(This post was edited by gpkisner on Oct 4, 2009, 11:37 AM)


esperanza

Oct 4, 2009, 2:06 PM

Post #28 of 39 (8917 views)

Shortcut

Re: [gpkisner] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
I'm still laughing at gpkisner's initial post about it.

I was kinda wondering if maybe Starcradle wasn't herself the casa chica.

(Just kidding, Starcradle, we know better!)

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Starcradle

Oct 5, 2009, 11:39 AM

Post #29 of 39 (8870 views)

Shortcut

Re: Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
Thank you all for your responses. I have read that the certified, apostilled copies of my birth certificate must be translated by an "approved" translator. Precisely what does this mean? Can I have them translated in Mexico? Would that be easier and less costly?

Also--how many copies would you suggest I take with me?




prmjcm


Oct 5, 2009, 12:35 PM

Post #30 of 39 (8855 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Starcradle] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
Yes starcradle they must be translated in mexico as that is where the approved translators meaning approved by the government are, you can get copies in mexico and, I would still suggest that your intended check with the closest INM and government office as what is requied, it differs in different locations, good luck on your Marriage


Rolly


Oct 5, 2009, 12:36 PM

Post #31 of 39 (8856 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Starcradle] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
All required documents must be translated in México. The government office you are dealing with will give you a list of approved translators. A single copy of your birth certificate with its apostille should be enough.

Rolly Pirate


Starcradle

Oct 5, 2009, 2:48 PM

Post #32 of 39 (8835 views)

Shortcut

Re: Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
Thank you so much for all of the informative responses. You have no idea how much it means to me, especially during this stressful time.

Thank you as well for your patience and kindness in answering questions that have probably been asked on previous occasions.



lsvgspepe

Oct 17, 2009, 6:31 PM

Post #33 of 39 (8743 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Starcradle] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
I have a friend, US citizen born in Iran. He took his then girl friend to Germany, Visas were hard to get for Iranians. They walk together to the American Embassy in Bonn Germany and cut lines by flashing his US passport to the guards and they were wisked in. She came on a "fiancee's" visa. Got married and 6 months later, she had her Permanent Resident Card. I guess it works everywhere. But, is a lot better to call or visit an ICE office.




homeless_vagabond

Oct 17, 2009, 7:29 PM

Post #34 of 39 (8727 views)

Shortcut

Re: [lsvgspepe] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
If the purpose of the exercise is to marry your intended spouse, it can really be done anywhere and be recognized by nearly any other government- you could be wed in Guatemala or Peru, for that matter.

It is a Civil ceremony, meaning that it has legal force.

In many areas, a Church wedding automatically has legal force; in others, the priest/pastor/minister must have authorization from the State to conduct the ceremony on behalf of the State. I cannot quote the Mexican law here. I do not know it.

In Alaska, anyone can marry any two people, provided the requisite number of witnesses are present. The reference is here:

-------------

Marriage Commissioner Appointments are issued through the Alaska Court System.

Under Alaska Statute 25.05.261(a)(2), anyone can perform a marriage ceremony, including a friend or relative, if they first obtain a marriage commissioner appointment from an Alaskan court as authorized by AS 25.05.081. The person should be 18 years of age or older, and does not need to be a resident of Alaska or the United States in order to perform the ceremony. Below is the Alaska Court System Web site for Marriage Commissioner appointments:

http://www.state.ak.us/courts/comm.htm
--------------

Option One: Theoretically, an American friend could travel to Alaska, obtain the commission, travel to Mexico, perform the civil ceremony before yourselves and two witnesses, the friend lies, everybody swears to it, and then travels back to Alaska to file the requisite paperwork... you are thus 'legally' married in a State of the Union.

Option Two is you do so on a ship in Alaska waters, without actually entering in to the United States through Immigration. Alaska and Canada share an inland waterway and you could get married on a ferry between islands, for example.

Option Three is to get married inside the US Consulate or Embassy by the ranking diplomat. You would be married in a Federal (not State) jurisdiction and would have to deal with Federal stuff, not State stuff exclusively.

Option Four is to be married by the Captain of a US-flagged ocean-going vessel on the High Seas. Cruise ship weddings are not unheard of these days... just different.

Now, I'm not a lawyer and this is not legal advice. I recommend you find a qualified legal advisor for definitive answers to your questions, if such people do, in fact, exist outside my fantasies.

just recall Alaska being pretty airy-fairy when it came to the letter of the law, or anything else. Legal system continues to be pretty Wild West. More info here: http://www.usmarriagelaws.com/search/united_states/alaska/index.shtml [however, the bit on their page on "Officiants" is pretty funny. Charging big fees just to be the stooge for the State (and then keeping all the cash!) is typically Alaskan. Anyone can be an Officiant.]

Many people conduct a civil marriage ceremony for the legal benefits and do the church ceremony later. There is no limit to the number of times you can get married to the same person and I know of no jurisdiction which requires that you divorce them before you remarry. People get remarried all the time... sometimes in every country they visit. Most places only want you to prove one time that you are married; usually as a result of wanting some benefit as a result of being married. Unwed people have far more advantages under the US legal system than married couples, especially tax-wise.

Now, I'm not a tax advisor and this should not be construed as tax, legal or other advice. Please find a qualified person to answer your tax questions, if such people do, in fact, exist.

So long as your marriage documents are certified and Apostilled by the appropriate jurisdiction, you should be fine. Immigration & Customs Enforcement (ICE) has absolutely no jurisdiction over marriages, which are under the jurisdiction of the individual States. It doesn't matter where you are married, so long as all of the paperwork is legit. Marrying in another country (outside the US) simply adds more paperwork should you want to return to the US to live/work in the future. It is not impossible, however.

(Now I should get back to my cookies!)


(This post was edited by homeless_vagabond on Oct 17, 2009, 7:34 PM)


robt65

Nov 7, 2009, 12:59 PM

Post #35 of 39 (8561 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Zorba] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
Hi Zorba,

I am also a Canadian that married a Mexican national. I found out only after bringing my furnishings and all my personal possessions here that my wife had a bi Polar disorder. She was hollering for divorce . . NOW and I was sacared as hell! I tried to get her to a doctor but she was not having any psrt of that . . . . long story short, I hired a lawyer and found out two very important things . . . . at least in this state. 1. What was yours before your marriage will always remain yours, pre nup or not. Second . . .A spouse can have Mexico and does give her the right to 50% (or possibly all) of what your assets were before you married. On the other hand, if she leaves the household for any period of time without it clearly being only for a holiday that you both agree to . . . . . she looses all even those things that you both obtained during the marriage. BEWARE . . . . . . . I have also learned from some very good mexican doctor friends of mine here in Mexico that here is a high rate of Bi Polar disorder in this country. I wish you well. Take care and cover your back. My marriage (so far) has worked out well. I still keep the signed (by her) divorce document at my Mexican lawyers office, just in case. I was lucky in that regard as she only wanted me to understand that she was not "abandoning" me. She agreeded for me to keep all things that I brought into the marriage and signed the document.

Robert in Tam.


Rolly


Nov 7, 2009, 1:11 PM

Post #36 of 39 (8548 views)

Shortcut

Re: [robt65] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
"....A spouse can have Mexico and does give her the right to 50%..."

There seems to be something wrong with that sentence.

Rolly Pirate


Zorba

Nov 7, 2009, 1:20 PM

Post #37 of 39 (8539 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Rolly] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
robt65, thanks for the reply. Like Rolly, some of what you wrote doesnt make sense to me. Can you explain?

I believe what is yours before the marriage remains yours in divorce.

If you marry "bienes separados" I was told that even what you obtain after marriage remains
yours as long as whatever it is (house, car, bank account, etc) is in your name. Im not sure about this though. I have to look into it more with my lawyer.

Are you saying that even with a "bienes separados" marriage the wife can take stuff you
obtained during the marriage?


(This post was edited by Zorba on Nov 7, 2009, 1:24 PM)


robt65

Nov 8, 2009, 7:44 PM

Post #38 of 39 (8447 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Zorba] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
Hi Zorba,

Sorry for my poor grammar- I am in the process of moving and I am actually doing this in the dark . . . . . you know Rolly . . . . . . take all the ceiling lights you brought with you to the rental house!!!! That is exactly what I am saying Zorba . . . . . . . . . . . . believe me, I just spent a good sum of money for an excellent civil lawyer and I was told under no circumstances do you leave the home with intent not to return . . . . . You will be accused of abandonment and then she can have it all buddy! ALL with a capital A! Let her do the leaving and the tables are reversed!

Robert


Zorba

Nov 8, 2009, 11:27 PM

Post #39 of 39 (8423 views)

Shortcut

Re: [robt65] Marriage

Can't Post | Private Reply
I see Rob. Thanks for the heads up.
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All
 
 
Search for (advanced search) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.4