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Manuel Dexterity

Sep 30, 2009, 6:08 PM

Post #26 of 41 (3045 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] No Problem With "Gringo"

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Before you offer opinions about Spanish you might want to learn the difference between ser and estar. It will help your credibility.


Rolly


Sep 30, 2009, 6:47 PM

Post #27 of 41 (3032 views)

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Re: [johanson] No Problem With "Gringo"

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Pete said "I guess Gringo means different things to different folks. Heck, I don't know.'

That seems to sum up this whole thread.

Rolly Pirate


ken_in_dfw

Sep 30, 2009, 7:12 PM

Post #28 of 41 (3012 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] No Problem With "Gringo"

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"Invasores," eh?

Hmm. Well, my hillbilly relatives back in the Ozarks, who find themselves suddenly tripping over tens of thousands of folks named "García," and "Bermúdez," and "Cruz," while trying to fund bi-lingual teachers, police and paramedics in their local communities probably have their own views about invasion. As did the Osage and Quapaws whom my ancestors replaced.

Perspective is a funny thing, isn't it?


La Isla


Sep 30, 2009, 8:24 PM

Post #29 of 41 (2992 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] No Problem With "Gringo"

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My wife and her family DON'T refer to Americanos as gringos, they refer to Americanos as "invasores" – "invaders".


Well, over the centuries Mexico has been invaded by the Spanish and the French as well as the Americans. How does your wife and her family refer to the Spanish and the French? Just curious...


yucatandreamer


Sep 30, 2009, 8:38 PM

Post #30 of 41 (2990 views)

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Re: [TIO GREENGLEE] No Problem With "Gringo"

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"Canadians use "Canuck" as an affectionate or merely descriptive term for their nationality. Other nationalities may use the word as an affectionate, or derogatory, or merely a descriptive term."

I took the above quote from Wickipedia and I pretty much think that "Gringo" or even "Yankee" can fall into the same classification. We use the word with affection or description amongst our friends. Some folks proudly sing that they are "Yankee Doodle Dandies" and some folks rarely say Yankee without at least a 'Damn" in front.


gpkgto

Oct 1, 2009, 5:45 AM

Post #31 of 41 (2977 views)

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Re: [johanson] No Problem With "Gringo"

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Here in the state of Guanajuato, "Gringolandia" means San Miguel de Allende--this is true.


Brian

Oct 1, 2009, 6:05 AM

Post #32 of 41 (2974 views)

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Re: [gpkisner] No Problem With "Gringo"

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"Here in the state of Guanajuato, "Gringolandia" means San Miguel de Allende--this is true."

I was going to reply with the same thing but, in my experience, the local Mexicans are referring specifically to the area with the benches in the Jardin which face the Parroquia.

Brian


(This post was edited by Brian on Oct 1, 2009, 6:07 AM)


gpkgto

Oct 1, 2009, 7:09 AM

Post #33 of 41 (2952 views)

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Re: [Brian] No Problem With "Gringo"

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The benches are La Sala de Espera de Dios.


mevale

Oct 1, 2009, 8:10 AM

Post #34 of 41 (2930 views)

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Re: [Rolly] No Problem With "Gringo"

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“Gabacho y gringo son lo mismo, y significa "american", pero como un modismo, o algo así. En Monterrey es raro escuchar gabacho, usamos "gringo". Sé que en Tijuana se usa gabacho, bueno, así escuché que dijo a alguien de allí. Pero de ningún modo lo decimos ofensivamente, es nada más una costumbre.
Apreciamos mucho a los "gringos".”
(native from Monterrey)





“(Gringo) es un nombre que se usa para evitar el larguísimo estadounidenses y por supuesto el mal usado americanos.
En sí mismo es neutro, y conozco muchos gringos que están orgullosos de que les llame así, pero porsupuesto se presta para ser usado con tono despectivo, especialmente cuandos se hacen generalizaciones.”
(native Mexican speaker, region unknown)





”For many of you that don't know Mexico or has never been here think that the name Gringo is offensive but when you has been in Mexico or know the reasons you understand that the name Gringo is absolutely descriptive and that we only use this name to describe people from the US because your real name is long and complicated to say.

You use to call yourself Americans, but for us Americans are all the people from Argentina to Alaska, when you say North Americans, for us North Americans are all the people from Mexico to Alaska too.

Your nationality in Spanish is long and complicated it is "Estadounidenses" and this is the short name because your nationality in Spanish by the name of your country is "Estadounidensesnorteamericanos" name that is crazy to use.”
(native speaker, DF)







P.D. El dice que esta palabra es ofensiva para para la gente de E.E.U.U., y la he usado en el foro, asi que no quiero ofender a nadie. ¿Es cierto que decirles gringo a ustedes es una ofensa?.” (Mexico, region unknown)

“No sé que respuesta te vayan a dar Novato, pero sé muy bien que no la usamos para ofender, y tengo amigos en los EE.UU. que les gusta llamarse a sí mismos gringos, porque saben que no lo hacemos con mala intención.” (native speaker DF)





Hi Reina, I'm sorry to hear that you stll feel offended, but please let me clarify some things:

Condoleeza Rice is not blond or white and she is still a gringa because she is from USA, in Mexico we call blonde/white people Güeros, no matter whether they are mexican, french or russian.

Some blond mexican people gets to be called gringos because they are thought to be from USA, not because they are blonds.

The word Gringo comes frrom the necessity to give a name to the people from USA (we can't call them americans) the official word is Estadounidense, but, as you see, is cumbersome to say the least.

Gringo is a legitime word that sometimes is used in a derogatory way, but is very different to a word like greaser, wetback or beaner, which is derogatory from the conception.”
(native Mexican, location unkown)


chinagringo


Oct 1, 2009, 9:00 AM

Post #35 of 41 (2911 views)

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Re: [willieboy] No Problem With "Gringo"

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It would seem to me that the use of the word "Gringo" SOB would be similar with the use of the word "Chicano" NOB. As explained in: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicano - there may be many uses, connotations, etc. As I have previously stated, I certainly have no problem with someone calling me a "Gringo" and if they choose to use the term as a negative - I just may have earned it. Hopefully not as I make every attempt to be respectful and circumspect in a host country but then again we can all make mistakes.

I was recently talking to a group of Chicano mechanics at the garage where I have my work done. Some were Mexico born and others were born here. They were asking me about our recent trip as none of them had experienced as much of Mexico as we have. I used the term "a**hole Gringos" to describe some behavior we had seen in one particular town in Mexico. Initially I think they were a bit shocked to hear me say that but started laughing when they realized it was coming out of my mouth. The owner of the garage was somewhat surprised that we had seen so much more and experienced more of his "Native Country" and was truly interested in expanding his horizons after talking to me!
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM



esperanza

Oct 1, 2009, 10:10 AM

Post #36 of 41 (2871 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] No Problem With "Gringo"

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I recently saw a man here in Morelia, apparently a Mexican national, sporting a T-shirt with the following:

I am not Hispanic.
I am not Latino.
I am not Chicano.

I AM MEXICAN.

'Gringo' is not analogous to chicano. Chicano is a term that was used at one time in the USA as a political activist designation but that has spilled over into broader usage.

The term Hispanic was invented in the USA to describe a certain racial or ethnic population. There is no group that calls itself Hispanic.

Many nations are included in the term Latino. The word is descriptive of a person's roots, but is very general.

No one has brought up the word pocho, which means a person born in Mexico of Mexican parents, but raised in the USA.


http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









bournemouth

Oct 1, 2009, 10:25 AM

Post #37 of 41 (2864 views)

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Re: [esperanza] No Problem With "Gringo"

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The way I have heard "pocho" used by Mexicans in Mexico is derogatory. Is it one of those names that can be used by "pochos" themselves without problems and is a sneer here? Or is it not used by those who fall into the category?


(This post was edited by bournemouth on Oct 1, 2009, 10:26 AM)


richmx2


Oct 1, 2009, 10:29 AM

Post #38 of 41 (2861 views)

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Re: [chinagringo] No Problem With "Gringo"

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"Chicano" might not be the best example, since it was (and in some circles, still is) used as a perjorative meaning rural (and, by extension, "backwards") Mexican-American dirt farmers, at least according to José Antonio Gutiérrez, founder of the La Raza Unida party, which was a factor in south Texas politics in the 70s.

"Gringo" usually -- in MEXICO -- means a person from the Untied States (and/or Canada) but in originally referred to "Greeks"... i.e. refugees from the Byzantine Empire, who poured into the Iberian peninsula after the fall of Constantinople in 1453.

A good example of a non-specific term for a class of foreigners might be "Turcos" ("Turks") used in various parts of Spanish-speaking America for any Middle Easterner.


http://mexfiles.net
http://editorialmazatlan.com


Manuel Dexterity

Oct 1, 2009, 10:52 AM

Post #39 of 41 (2852 views)

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Re: [esperanza] No Problem With "Gringo"

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The term Hispanic was invented in the USA to describe a certain racial or ethnic population. There is no group that calls itself Hispanic.


This is incorrect, outside of the USA the word denotes people who speak Spanish. In reference to the USA, that is only one of its uses.The USA didn't invent the term, it has been used for a long time. It comes from Latin.

hispano, na.

(Del lat. Hispañus).


1. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a Hispania.

2. adj. español. Apl. a pers., u. t. c. s.

3. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a las naciones de Hispanoamérica.

4. adj. Perteneciente o relativo a la población de origen hispanoamericano que vive en los Estados Unidos de América.

5. m. y f. Persona de ese origen que vive en los Estados Unidos de América.




richmx2


Oct 1, 2009, 12:45 PM

Post #40 of 41 (2830 views)

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Re: [Manuel Dexterity] No Problem With "Gringo"

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In the sense of coming from the Iberian peninsula, "hispanic" is used in Spanish... not in the sense of coming from Latin America. I've seldom seen it used to refer to all Spanish-speaking Latin Americas, and even heard resentment against the term from Mexicans doing business in the Untied States.

The term is a bit difficult to figure out. Would a Mexican named Cuauhtémoc Chong Goldberg be Hispanic? Was Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori Fujimori? A Nauha speaking immigrant, to the United States is called "hispanic" by the census bureau and by the government, but that doesn't mean he has any connection to Iberia. Recently, there was an attempt to classify the great early 20th century U.S. jurist Benjamin Cardozo as "hispanic" (his ancestors had lived in Portugal before the 16th century, but Cardozo himself considered his background Anglo-Dutch, just like the Roosevelts).


http://mexfiles.net
http://editorialmazatlan.com


tonyburton


Oct 1, 2009, 1:16 PM

Post #41 of 41 (2815 views)

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Re: [richmx2] No Problem With "Gringo"

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I am bringing this discussion to a close. If you have a new point to make, please start a new thread. Tony
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