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Jim in Cancun

Oct 27, 2001, 7:53 AM

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Ranchito update

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Elaine

Oct 28, 2001, 9:00 PM

Post #2 of 3 (5670 views)

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Ranchito update

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I can tell you a little about pumps and wells. We put a 2 horsepower submerge pump in and had a pressure tank right in the well house. It took the water from the well to the house which is about 300 feet, up a slight hill. The water pressure was always good. This is one area I would not pinch pennies on. We had a water filter in the pump house. A good regulator is required. We had one that was going out and caused the pump to viberate and some of the wires broke. We thought we were going to have to replace the pump but only had to replace the regulator and the wiring.


BOMBAS

Mar 15, 2002, 8:32 PM

Post #3 of 3 (5676 views)

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Ranchito update

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: 1.-Was out buying "fruit trees" lately. Have bought, Tangerine, Orange (One has to specify "sweet" here as there is a "sour" local variety that is good and used in cooking around here.), pineapple,mamey, apricot,avacado, grapefruit and zapote--still waiting on the mango to arrive. Great time for planting--as I type (5:25 a.m.)it is pouring down rain--rain lots last night too. I know these all need lots of sun and am planting them in the open--any other tips will be appreciated. Many of wat I have bought are "injertos" or grafts--common around here. They graft oranges onto an "old" trunk and the orange thinks it is old and starts producing.<p>: 2.- Should finish installing the pump in the well today. Beware: horsepower is not the only thing to consider. Many 1/4 HP pumbs can pull up the water from 8 meters down but that doesn't mean that a 1 HP will do it--has to do with other technical stuff so check first. And make sure that not only can the the pumb suck up the water but that it can also push it up to the level of your water tank if you have one. A submergible may be the best bet in the long run. I am using copper tubing.<p>: 3.- Starting building a "chicken coop" of the local variety. Small foundation with tree trunks as posts and then chicken wire around it--and a palapa-type straw roof--3 x 3 meters square. Materials and installation of the pumping sytem for the well (does not include the cistern or storage part yet)cost about $2,200 pesos--$250 usd including the labor of about $45 usd. I bought an electric pump for about $85 usd which will run off of the portable generator for now.<p>: 4.- Have made a U=type entrance/exit. Because of the unevenness of the land had to put up retaining wall in part and do fill in others. (un)Fortunately there is LOTS of rock on the land so for most projects they (you didn't think I was doing all this hard work myself, did you??)dig down to the bedrock, refill with large rock then fill in wit the small gravel that they sifted out of the sand before using it to make the cement and then top it of with "sascab". Not sure how to translate the word. It is white limestone-based grainy dirt that compacts with the rain and traffic to an almost concrete like surface. It is what the ancient Maya used to make their roads. (Sacbe=white road)<p>: 5.- After analyzing all of the energy options, solar, wind, etc. the easiest and most economical seems to be to hook up (eventually) to the Light Company's system so I installed 8 light posts which will be used to connect to the main transformer once it is operating in the area. Total cost of installing the 8 cement posts was $10,000 pesos. Still have to put the cable, crossbars and insulators on--added to the cost of the transformer, the connection will cost about $20,000 pesos more for a total to connect to the electrical network of about $30,000 pesos as compared to 5 times that for a partial solar system. <p>: More later as progress continues.<p>
 
 
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