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Nadejda

Nov 6, 2001, 2:06 AM

Post #1 of 9 (4456 views)

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Mold

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My friend who doesn't speak English asked me to post this question for her.
Her house has developed a very bad mold problem. It shows on two walls. It is the worst in a back room. The outer wall of that room looks on a very narrow space (about a foot or a foot and a half wide) between her house and the house nextdoor. It is impossible to enter that space, only to look into it from the houses' roofs. No light goes in there and it is always damp. The mold now covers pretty much the whole wall, it is dark and has a nasty smell. The house is made of bricks, the walls are thin (I guess no thicker then just one-brick). The wall is painted with water-based acrilic paint.
There is also some mold in an upstairs bedroom, which is on the other side of the house (no contact with the most-damaged wall, no mold in the rooms between the two damaged ones) and is adjusent to another neighboring house (there is no space between her house and that other house at all).
So, her question is What can be done? or Is her house completely doomed now?
Sorry that I coudn't explain it clearer - I don't know much about construction.



Loco

Nov 6, 2001, 9:13 AM

Post #2 of 9 (4447 views)

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Mold

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1. Pressure was and seal the wall from the outside. You should be able to get extensions for washing and spray painting to reach in the space. Might try cement sealer that keeps basements dry.<p>2. Just use bleach to kill mold inside and then seal it. Might have to do this often if outside problem is not fixed. Pigmented shellac is the typical interior sealer (seals crayon, magic marker, etc).<p>3. Figure out a way to move the wall to meet your neighbors so there is no space.


norm

Nov 6, 2001, 3:17 PM

Post #3 of 9 (4445 views)

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Mold - a follow up to Loco's posting ...

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Mold is a fungi that is alive and spreads in AND on
porous surfaces where is there is lack of air circulation
and light, particularly sun light.
We had a similar problem up north and reliable experts
advised us to (1) scrape completely whatever visible mold
is on the surfaces, (2) then make sure all surfaced are
dry (3) then with a strong solution of bleach 1 part bleach
(i.e. Javex or equivalent) to 5 parts water and scrub all
affected surfaces. (4) then apply as much heat (hot air) as
possible and only after the above steps (5) apply a water
based ciment sealer to allow pores of the ciment to "breath".
Best would then be to make sure there is some air circulation
in the area to control re-occuring continuous humidity.
Good luck.


Marvin Kemel

Nov 12, 2001, 12:11 AM

Post #4 of 9 (4447 views)

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Mold

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This is a job for an expert. The mold is dangerous. You should not breathe it. Can you spell Legionaire's disease.


Curtis

Nov 24, 2001, 2:29 AM

Post #5 of 9 (4448 views)

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Mold

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Yes, mold can be dangerous, BUT...<p>It can be killed using a bleach and water solution. <p>I would recommend moving the furnishings away from the wall and protecting the carpet (if any) and spraying the wall with a solution of bleach and water (one (1) part bleach, and four (4) parts water) with a plastic spray bottle, or a pump up garden sprayer (Use a fan for proper ventilation).<p>Having done this once, it may be necessary to treat the the area again if the mold/mildew/or algae has not completely disappeared or changed color dramatically. In any case, treat the affected area twice, then use a scrub brush and fresh clean water to remove any heavy residues of dead alge. Don't use soap. Soap can leave residues which can act as a host and feed the mildew. <p>Next apply heat and/or put a fan in the room until the wall is completely dry. It would be a good idea to treat all the walls in the room because mildew is a microscopic spore and even though it may not be visible, it may still be present.<p>Next prime all the walls with a quality primer. The suggestion for white pigmented shellac is a good one, but not for the purpose of sealing the algae in, but to keep moisture out. The suggestion for an "breathable" latex primer is a likely suggestion, but not one I would recommend because the problem may be from moisture entering the house THROUGH the bricks.<p>I would recommend a quick dry alkyd primer sealer (Such as "Kilz"). It has the same quick dry, sealing properties of shellac, has a slower dry time, is easier to apply, and cleans up with paint thinner rather that denatured alcohol. It will seal moisture out, and offer a good base for your top coat. Be sure to ventilate well during painting. <p>Next, apply one or two coats of a low sheen or satin latex enamel over the primer. Enamels are less porous than flat (no sheen) paints and will not offer a good enviroment for mildew and algae. DO NOT USE AN OIL BASE TOP COAT. Under the right conditions, oil base paints and stains can actually promote mildew growth. They contain organinc oils like linseed oil and the mildew will actually use the paint as a host and feed on it.<p>After the interior walls are cleaned, sealed, and painted (make sure choose an attrractive color and paint the whole room :) ), it's time to address the reason for the mold.<p>There can be any number of reasons. High humidity, warmth and lack of air flow are probably the main reason. Installing a fan will help tremednously and periodic cleaning with bleach and water every one or two years should keep the problem under control.<p>However... there may be moisture coming from OUTSIDE the house.<p>If the roof leaks, water may be getting into places it shouldn't and during the evaporation process the house gets damp enough for mildew to grow.<p>Or if there are no gutters and the house is in an area which gets heavy rains, water sitting on the ground outside and splashing onto the brick wall may be allowing water to seep into the brick where it evaporates into the house. If this is the case, installing gutters and priming the exterior wall with a latex primer and a latex top coat (low sheen) should help.<p>Also, if the brick wall is in bad repair, water may be seeping into the cracks. Repairing the mortar with mortar or cement or filling them with a latex acrylic caulk will help if this is the case.<p>If the outside of the wall is not painted, it is best not to paint it, but to apply a good quality, clear masonry sealer. Paint on brick can have a tendency to peel under certain conditions. (I forgot to mention that peeling paint on the exterior wall may let moisture into the brick. Brick is very porous and absorbs water and moisture quickly and easily. When it dries, the water evaporates out both sides of the bricks. This may be the cause for the mold inside the house.<p>If there is bad drainage around the house, i.e. water from the streets and gutters drain directly into the dirt next to the house, and there are no curtain drains around the foundation to drain the ground water away from the house, this might be a


Curtis

Nov 24, 2001, 5:17 PM

Post #6 of 9 (4450 views)

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I just realized

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I didn't read your original post well enough to diagnose the problem. I see now that the problem is two fold... <p>One, moisture may be seeping through the bricks from the oustide
creating a moist surface on the interior wall allowing mildew growth.<p>Two, the brick wall is thin and dense, and because it is damp on the outside, and never receives sunlight, it is always cold. This means that the surface of the wall is always cooler than the air inside the house and moisture in the house condenses on the wall when the house warms up every day.<p>Solution:<p>a) Follow the above procedures for cleaning, painting, and installing a fan. Inspect and clean regularly. <p>b) If it seems that moisture is seeping through the brick from the outside (is the paint peeling on the inside wall?), climb up on the roof and using a pump up garden sprayer, lean down into the small space between the two buildings and spray (saturate) the brick wall with a clear, water repellent masonry sealer. Start at the top and be very thourough. Spray as much of the wall as possible until it is thoroughly wet with sealer. This should be done during the hottest part of the season so the bricks are as dry as possible and will absorb the sealer. If they are wet with moisture, the sealer will simply sit on top and do nothing. Be sure and wear a respirator or take frequent breaks for fresh air.<p>An alternative to this if the outer wall is always wet and can't be sealed, is to seal the INSIDE of the wall using an elastomeric block filler. These products are water based, extremely thick, and designed to fill all cracks, crevices, and pores. They are impervious to moisture. The Kilz primer I recommended earlier may work well, but if there is moisture coming through the wall, the Kilz may eventually peel as the moisture tries to evaporate into the room.<p>Hope this helps. God Bless and Good Luck! :)<p>Curtis


ashley logan

Feb 24, 2002, 11:11 AM

Post #7 of 9 (4445 views)

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Mold

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 I had the same problem in my house a ll you need to do is use this stuff I used. I used tilex


Donaldh2

May 5, 2002, 4:43 PM

Post #8 of 9 (4445 views)

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Mold

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: I had the same problem in my house a ll you need to do is use this stuff I used. I used tilex<p>Landlor is in Violate Safety Code Mold in the<p>2 bedroom and hed living room there is mold
behild the well. mold windows


Donaldh2

May 5, 2002, 4:44 PM

Post #9 of 9 (4447 views)

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Mold

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: I had the same problem in my house a ll you need to do is use this stuff I used. I used tilex<p>Landlor is in Violate Safety Code Mold in the<p>2 bedroom and hed living room there is mold
behild the well. mold windows
Send Landlird Pic of the mold last year her ingrone
mu complaint
 
 
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