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Tom

Nov 6, 2001, 7:20 PM

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foundations

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Howdy All...<p>We are new owners of an older home in La Peņita, Nayarit. I am not familiar with the terms; what are the cells called that
comprise typical home construction in our area? Almost all the rooms in our home are one of these cells (concrete pillars,
bricked arches under concrete lintel) about 10 feet square.<p>One of the first things we would like to do is build a new apartment for our caretaker. I am thinking about two side by side
cells stacked two high, probably with interior stairs and an exterior balcony. Where can I see some floor plans for something
like this? I am thinking of the two rooms downstairs as laundry area, work room with a patio in front. Upstairs a combo living
room kitchen with about a half cell balcony over the patio and the second upstairs cell a bedroom.<p>Our property has a fence that is too ugly to stay for long. Replacing it with a good security wall with arched openings &
ironwork would be a pretty straight forward job but with an eye to the future, I would like the new perimeter wall to be stout
enough to carry a heavy load. Some day I think we will want to extend the flat roof to the perimeter wall. (a span of about 16
feet.) What kind of foundation work is usually done under a wall like this? I am pretty sure that we are built on plain sand.<p>I wish I knew who built our house in the first place. It seems really stout; no signs of cracks or movement.<p>I have lots of ideas. I need to know if my ideas are safe to build. Can anyone recommend an area engineer or architect?
(which do you seek first?)<p>Tom



John

Nov 7, 2001, 1:11 AM

Post #2 of 5 (7148 views)

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foundations

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Hey there, welcome to Mexico. First of all those "cells" you are talking about is post and beam construction. Try a google search for more info or send me and e-mail I have several articles I can forward to you about various aspects of building.<p>Foundations: A typical foundation is about 1 meter deep and 50 cm. wide. More or less. Depends on how much weight or load it will carry.<p>Usually a brick wall is constructed then "columns" are poured in place. At the bottom and top of the walls a "dala" or horizontal column is poured. Both dalas and columns need to be reinforced. Dalas are also placed over doors and windows. <p>If you know what you want in terms of floor plan you should talk with an engineer if you don't know then you should talk with the other guy. You will also want to go down to the public works (obras publica) office and get permission. You will need a set of plans signed by someone licenced and some cash. Not much else. Well, you will need proof that you own the house. <p>You should also be inquiring as to who is a good "avanil" or mason. You are going to need one or two. On this count you need to check then check again. The real cost is going to be in labor. <p>If you ask your neighbors they will probably know who built the house. But I doubt that they will give you the name of an engineer but rather the name of the avanil.<p>Hope this helps you get started. Good luck.


Loco

Nov 7, 2001, 11:21 PM

Post #3 of 5 (7148 views)

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foundations

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So you build the slab and foundation first, with protruding rebar to reach second floor lentils (cross beams) at column positions. Then your mason constructs brick walls between the non-existant columns. Then you create forms and pour the columns. Then you create forms and pour lentils (cross beams) somehow inserting window lentils ... blah, blah. Then somehow you support forms for your second floor pour with ties to lentils that you forgot .... <p>I think I need to see this in person<p>My first try woud be a house of cards<p>


Pernel S Thyseldew

Nov 11, 2001, 7:17 PM

Post #4 of 5 (7147 views)

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&quot;Autoconstruction de su Casa&quot; (BOOK)

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There is a book available in spanish:
"Autoconstruction de su Casa" or something very close, which describes with drawings the 'Castillo & Cadena' method of steel re-enforced concrete construction.
The beauty of this is that local labor, with only a handful of products and tools, can produce very durable, cheap houses.
Here is a material list:<p>Cement
Sand
Gravel
re-bar
tie wire
quarter inch wire (alhambron)
planks & posts (rented)<p>
and these tools:<p>Shovel
buckets
trowel
pliers
hacksaw
chisels
hammer
plumb
hose (water level)
tie-wire twister
re-bar bender
mold (for making blocks)
ladder (home made)
digging bar <p>A mason will arrive for work with all his tools in a white bucket and a homemade ladder carried by the assistant.<p>Plumbing and Electrial are usually farmed out to sub-contractors who bring their own special tools.<p>Hope this helps.


enrique Nieto sotelo

Jan 7, 2002, 9:09 PM

Post #5 of 5 (7148 views)

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&quot;Autoconstruction de su Casa&quot; (BOOK)

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: There is a book available in spanish:
: "Autoconstruction de su Casa" or something very close, which describes with drawings the 'Castillo & Cadena' method of steel re-enforced concrete construction.
: The beauty of this is that local labor, with only a handful of products and tools, can produce very durable, cheap houses.
: Here is a material list:<p>: Cement
: Sand
: Gravel
: re-bar
: tie wire
: quarter inch wire (alhambron)
: planks & posts (rented)<p>:
: and these tools:<p>: Shovel
: buckets
: trowel
: pliers
: hacksaw
: chisels
: hammer
: plumb
: hose (water level)
: tie-wire twister
: re-bar bender
: mold (for making blocks)
: ladder (home made)
: digging bar <p>: A mason will arrive for work with all his tools in a white bucket and a homemade ladder carried by the assistant.<p>: Plumbing and Electrial are usually farmed out to sub-contractors who bring their own special tools.<p>: Hope this helps.<p>
 
 
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