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Hound Dog

Jun 10, 2009, 8:31 AM

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I Love Paris in the Summer When it Drizzles

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Well it seemed a good idea to escape the incessant heat and dust at Lakeside in May and part of June but the cold advent of the rainy season in May in the Chiapas Highlands seemed a poor alternative so why not Paris? Here it is June 10th and here in Paris it is raining and cold for the fourth day in a row and I am supposed to leave for a short trip on the TGV for Frankfurt tomorrow. We in Highland Mexico forget how fortunate we are with that splendid climate so here I am on the computer avoiding the rain and bone chilling dampness in Paris instead of lounging about my garden in Ajijic kissing my dogs and scarfing down a Cheese Whopper. ( MacDonalds kicked Burger Kings butt in France and ran them out of town. A damn shame).



La Isla


Jun 10, 2009, 9:02 AM

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Re: [Hound Dog] I Love Paris in the Summer When it Drizzles

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With all the fabulous food available in Paris, why do the locals dine at McDonald's? In the States, McDonald's is mostly for the young and those with limited incomes - what sorts of people frequent it in Paris?


(This post was edited by La Isla on Jun 10, 2009, 9:44 AM)


Hound Dog

Jun 10, 2009, 12:13 PM

Post #3 of 23 (8758 views)

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Re: [La Isla] I Love Paris in the Summer When it Drizzles

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With all the fabulous food available in Paris, why do the locals dine at McDonald's? In the States, McDonald's is mostly for the young and those with limited incomes - what sorts of people frequent it in Paris?

Oh, La Isla, the little MacDough story was meant as an amusing aside. What is it you seek from my irreverent posts?

MacDough and other such sandwich joints are enormously popular in Paris among folks of all ages and income groups and if you do not know that it is because you do not know that. What is it you expect from me7


Georgia


Jun 10, 2009, 6:23 PM

Post #4 of 23 (8727 views)

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Re: [Hound Dog] I Love Paris in the Summer When it Drizzles

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After reading your post on the price of food in France, McDonald's looks like a viable option even to me. And I rarely eat meat.


FeelinGroovy

Jun 10, 2009, 9:46 PM

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Re: [Hound Dog] I Love Paris in the Summer When it Drizzles

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Ah, Paris. Last year we spent the month of June in a lovely little apartment in St-Germain-des-Pres. Since we had a kitchen we were able to take advantage of the fabulous local market and bakery. The weather was perfect the entire time. I wish I was there now.

Get out in the rain and enjoy.
Libby



Hound Dog

Jun 11, 2009, 3:11 AM

Post #6 of 23 (8689 views)

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Re: [FeelinGroovy] I Love Paris in the Summer When it Drizzles

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OK, Libby;

We took your advice and went out to Downtown Puteax, a part of te Paris conurbation at La Defense and bought some artisanally cured ham, a bagette of extraordinary quality, some fresh and sweet cherry tomatoes, some incredible cheese, mayonaisse made with extra virgin olive oil and that will see us through the day with a bit of red wine and an eclair.

This aint San Germain des Pres but it also aint Witchita and we can be on the Left Bank in twenty minutes which beats twenty minutes to Downtown Fresno.


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on Jun 11, 2009, 3:20 AM)


FeelinGroovy

Jun 11, 2009, 7:12 AM

Post #7 of 23 (8674 views)

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Re: [Hound Dog] I Love Paris in the Summer When it Drizzles

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Please have a pan chocolat for me.
Libby



DavidMcL


Jun 11, 2009, 7:58 AM

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Loving Mexico

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Lets move the discussion back to Mexico please.

David'
David McL
WebJefe


tashby


Jun 11, 2009, 8:12 AM

Post #9 of 23 (8662 views)

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Re: [DavidMcL] Loving Mexico

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Lets move the discussion back to Mexico please.

David'


Okay. And I can even build the bridge...

So last week we sit down to eat an a nice restaurant in West Ajijic. Before our Caesar Salads are prepared tableside, the waiter gives us each a warm croissant. (Get it? Paris....Mexico....croissant? You're welcome!) Now, I don't know what everyone else's experience has been, but in mine croissants in Mexico have trended toward lead. These were actually decent! (Not great, mind you, but decent.) Thinking there might be some hidden pananderia in Ajijic that produced these, I asked the woman who was filling our water glasses where they bought their croissants....

"Farmacia Guadalajara," she replied, matter of factly.

Well, of course...


(This post was edited by tashby on Jun 11, 2009, 8:15 AM)


mkdutch

Jun 14, 2009, 2:49 PM

Post #10 of 23 (8584 views)

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Re: [tashby] Loving Mexico

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You have just been handed the first clue in a treasure hunt, Tashby...Please let us know where Farmacia Guadalajara leads you to...( I suspect it may be to the PAN off Colon just a short block off the Carreterra and to the left..........;o).


esperanza

Jun 14, 2009, 3:52 PM

Post #11 of 23 (8569 views)

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Re: [mkdutch] Loving Mexico

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You have just been handed the first clue in a treasure hunt, Tashby...Please let us know where Farmacia Guadalajara leads you to...( I suspect it may be to the PAN off Colon just a short block off the Carreterra and to the left..........;o).

Hmm...Farmacia Guadalajara in Ajijic has its own bakery, it doesn't depend on anyone else to do its baking. So the 'clue' is in fact the final destination, at least for the croissants tashby ate.

Farmacia Guadalajara's pan is really very good.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









tashby


Jun 14, 2009, 3:58 PM

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Re: [mkdutch] Loving Mexico

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Ha!

No, I've actually been to that "secret" Panaderia. ("Take a left into the Privada.....walk to the end.....find the almost unmarked door on the right.....walk down the otherwise empty hallway filled with bags of flour.....") The croissants at this restaurant were far superior to those available there. I know he does other things well, though.

The greatest irony in all this is, I've walked into Farmacia Guadalajra countless times. Every time I enter while they're baking I'm physically sickened by the smell.


Brigitte Ordoquy

Jun 15, 2009, 1:58 AM

Post #13 of 23 (8524 views)

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Re: [tashby] Loving Mexico

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The croissants from the Farmcia Guadalajara are far superior to those of the famous secret bakery in Ajijic; In Chiapas Chedraui makes delicious croissants as well. T


NEOhio1


Jun 15, 2009, 2:08 PM

Post #14 of 23 (8474 views)

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Re: [Brigitte Ordoquy] Loving Mexico

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Farmacia Guadalajara does have good croissants, and if you ask nicely they will sell you the croissant before they bake it so you can do it yourself, at home and have a nice smell and good eats.


tonyburton


Jun 15, 2009, 3:10 PM

Post #15 of 23 (8462 views)

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Re: [NEOhio1] Loving Mexico

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But Alfredo's chocolate crossaints are even better - though you have to go to Guad for those!


esperanza

Jun 15, 2009, 3:29 PM

Post #16 of 23 (8457 views)

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Re: [tonyburton] Loving Mexico

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But Alfredo's chocolate crossaints are even better - though you have to go to Guad for those!

Just when I thought I had my addiction to Alfredo's chocolate croissants under control--you HAD to bring it up! I know at least three Alfredo's locations in Guadalajara...not that I have BEEN to all three...umm...well, maybe I have...<blushes>

<thinking about when she could plan a trip to Guadalajara...or when someone from Guadalajara is coming this way...>

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tonyburton


Jun 15, 2009, 3:33 PM

Post #17 of 23 (8454 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Loving Mexico

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Hmm... I've definitely been to at least three, though never yet to more than two in any one day...


esperanza

Jun 15, 2009, 3:53 PM

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Re: [tonyburton] Loving Mexico

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Hmm... I've definitely been to at least three, though never yet to more than two in any one day...

LOL...

When you warm them up just a bit in the microwave and then bite into the croissant, the chocolate oozes down your hand, and you have to lick it, and then you bite it and it oozes again, and again..oh Satanás, thy name is Alfredo...

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cristalhombre


Jun 16, 2009, 5:04 PM

Post #19 of 23 (8381 views)

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Re: [DavidMcL] Loving Mexico

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This thread is titled "Loving Mexico"........... I have attached an upbeat Mexico story from Linda Ellerbee's column......it's a couple weeks old, but I don't recall reading it here on M/C. Sorry if this is a duplicate. It's nice to hear some "positive" words from the media types.

Linda Ellerbee’s Mexico: It’s Much Better Than You Think
Posted on May 21, 2009
By Lola
Linda Ellerbee is a journalist who is better known for several jobs at NBC News, including Washington (DC) correspondent, host of the Nickelodeon network’s Nick News, and reporter and co-anchor of NBC News Overnight, which was recognized by the jurors of the duPont Columbia Awards as “possibly the best written and most intelligent news program ever.” She’s also a cancer survivor, a foodie, and an all-around inspiration to many women. Oh, and did we mention she loves Mexico? Read on for a first-class, first-person view of life in Mexico from a way cool gringa’s point of view, recently published online in the Banderas News. Enjoy!
Mexico: One Journalist’s View
By Linda Ellerbee


Sometimes I’ve been called a maverick because I don’t always agree with my colleagues, but then, only dead fish swim with the stream all the time. The stream here is Mexico.
You would have to be living on another planet to avoid hearing how dangerous Mexico has become, and, yes, it’s true drug wars have escalated violence in Mexico, causing collateral damage, a phrase I hate. Collateral damage is a cheap way of saying that innocent people, some of them tourists, have been robbed, hurt or killed.
But that’s not the whole story. Neither is this.


This is my story.
I’m a journalist who lives in New York City, but has spent considerable time in Mexico, specifically Puerto Vallarta, for the last four years. I’m in Vallarta now. And despite what I’m getting from the U.S. media, the 24-hour news networks in particular, I feel as safe here as I do at home in New York, possibly safer.
I walk the streets of my Vallarta neighborhood alone day or night. And I don’t live in a gated community, or any other All-Gringo neighborhood. I live in Mexico. Among Mexicans. I go where I want (which does not happen to include bars where prostitution and drugs are the basic products), and take no more precautions than I would at home in New York; which is to say I don’t wave money around, I don’t act the Ugly American, I do keep my eyes open, I’m aware of my surroundings, and I try not to behave like a fool.
I’ve not always been successful at that last one. One evening a friend left the house I was renting in Vallarta at that time, and, unbeknownst to me, did not slam the automatically-locking door on her way out. Sure enough, less than an hour later a stranger did come into my house. A burglar? Robber? Kidnapper? Killer? Drug lord?
No, it was a local police officer, the “beat cop” for our neighborhood, who, on seeing my unlatched door, entered to make sure everything (including me) was okay. He insisted on walking with me around the house, opening closets, looking behind doors and, yes, even under beds, to be certain no one else had wandered in, and that nothing was missing. He was polite, smart and kind, but before he left, he lectured me on having not checked to see that my friend had locked the door behind her. In other words, he told me to use my common sense.

Do bad things happen here? Of course they do. Bad things happen everywhere, but the murder rate here is much lower than, say, New Orleans, and if there are bars on many of the ground floor windows of houses here, well, the same is true where I live, in Greenwich Village, which is considered a swell neighborhood — house prices start at about $4 million (including the bars on the ground floor windows.)

There are good reasons thousands of people from the United States are moving to Mexico every month, and it’s not just the lower cost of living, a hefty tax break and less snow to shovel. Mexico is a beautiful country, a special place.
The climate varies, but is plentifully mild, the culture is ancient and revered, the young are loved unconditionally, the old are respected, and I have yet to hear anyone mention Britney Spears, Lindsay Lohan, or Madonna’s attempt to adopt a second African child, even though, with such a late start, she cannot possibly begin to keep up with Angelina Jolie.

And then there are the people. Generalization is risky, but— in general — Mexicans are warm, friendly, generous and welcoming. If you smile at them, they smile back. If you greet a passing stranger on the street, they greet you back. If you try to speak even a little Spanish, they tend to treat you as though you were fluent. Or at least not an idiot.
I have had taxi drivers track me down after leaving my wallet or cell phone in their cab. I have had someone run out of a store to catch me because I have overpaid by twenty cents. I have been introduced to and come to love a people who celebrate a day dedicated to the dead as a recognition of the cycles of birth and death and birth — and the 15th birthday of a girl, an important rite in becoming a woman — with the same joy.

Too much of the noise you’re hearing about how dangerous it is to come to Mexico is just that — noise. But the media love noise, and too many journalists currently making it don’t live here. Some have never even been here. They just like to be photographed at night, standing near a spotlighted border crossing, pointing across the line to some imaginary country from hell. It looks good on TV.
Another thing. The U.S. media tend to lump all of Mexico into one big bad bowl. Talking about drug violence in Mexico without naming a state or city where this is taking place is rather like looking at the horror of Katrina and saying, “Damn. Did you know the U.S. is under water?” or reporting on the shootings at Columbine or the bombing of the Federal building in Oklahoma City by saying that kids all over the U.S. are shooting their classmates and all the grownups are blowing up buildings. The recent rise in violence in Mexico has mostly occurred in a few states, and especially along the border. It is real, but it does not describe an entire country.
It would be nice if we could put what’s going on in Mexico in perspective, geographically and emotionally. It would be nice if we could remember that, as has been noted more than once, these drug wars wouldn’t be going on if people in the United States didn’t want the drugs, or if other people in the United States weren’t selling Mexican drug lords the guns.

Most of all, it would be nice if more people in the United States actually came to this part of America (Mexico is also America, you will recall) to see for themselves what a fine place Mexico really is, and how good a vacation (or a life) here can be.
So come on down and get to know your southern neighbors. I think you’ll like it here.


Especially the people.






"NOT ALL WHO WANDER ARE LOST...."

(This post was edited by cristalhombre on Jun 16, 2009, 5:19 PM)


La Isla


Jun 16, 2009, 6:09 PM

Post #20 of 23 (8367 views)

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Re: [cristalhombre] Loving Mexico

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I've always admired Linda Ellerbee's work, and this article just adds to my positive opinion of her intelligence and common-sense way of viewing the world. Thanks for posting it here for all of us to read.


(This post was edited by La Isla on Jun 16, 2009, 6:10 PM)


gbatrucks


Jun 19, 2009, 12:55 AM

Post #21 of 23 (8264 views)

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Re: [tashby] Loving Mexico

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Take a close look at those ovens at the Pharmacia Guadalajara & you'll note that they are made in France.
"The trouble with life is there's no background music."


toucantango


Jun 23, 2009, 11:28 AM

Post #22 of 23 (8173 views)

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Re: [tonyburton] Loving Mexico

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Hmm... I've definitely been to at least three, though never yet to more than two in any one day...


Please give me an address to at least one Alfredo's before I drool myself to death!!!




http://www.toucantango.ca


esperanza

Jun 23, 2009, 12:52 PM

Post #23 of 23 (8157 views)

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Re: [toucantango] Loving Mexico

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There's a Croissants Alfredo on the andadera (walkway) on the east side of the Templo Expiatorio. The walkway runs south from Av. Vallarta, between the art museum of the UdeG and the plaza in front of the church.

If you aren't familiar with this church, it's fabulous, a hidden gem in Guadalajara. On Sundays at 6:00PM, there are free danzón classes in the church plaza. You could combine a trip to buy croissants with a visit to the church and a lovely time of watching the dancing--or taking a class yourself, Sr. Toucantango. Then Toucandanzón as well!

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