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prmjcm


Jun 9, 2009, 7:38 PM

Post #26 of 39 (5176 views)

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Re: [jfurgers] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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jfurgers back off is a very strong statement since you said anyone should be able to say what they feel, I usually do not get involved in these discussions but i feel you are not listening to what you say, if you really feel this way why not try another part of mexico or as advised, leave somewhere if you are not happy. Maybe people find that you are a little rude. So instead of back off how about if you lighten up a little bit.

Pat Moore


Marlene


Jun 9, 2009, 7:46 PM

Post #27 of 39 (5173 views)

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Re: [jfurgers] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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jfurgers, It doesn't seem that you were pointing out negative FACTS. You were stating your OPINION. Fine. There is a big difference. Obviously there are people on this forum who know GOOD, well-mannered people who live in the DF. Why judge all of the city by only those you have encountered? There are nice and not nice in every place in the world.


johanson


Jun 9, 2009, 7:57 PM

Post #28 of 39 (5166 views)

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Re: [La Isla] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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It's amazing how two people can have such different opinions. I know what I find very charming about Mexico some of my fellow Americans hate. And how what I find objectionable, a very slow internet speed, is so unimportant to others. I love Mexico. Some of that love for Mx might be because I can kind of sort of speak Spanish. But then I have always liked everywhere I have lived. It's just that I like some places better than others. Sometimes, those who hate where they live in the US and then move to Mexico, will hate Mexico too. Might it be that they would hate where-ever they might live?

I will get attacked for this, but do you know what bothers me most, is how few of my fellow Americans learn the language of the country they are living in. I know how lazy I am, and I was never a good language student in school, and I learned "BAD" Spanish, so if I can learn Spanish so can the majority of the rest of you, yet so many in Ajijic don't.

Ok, :) now attack me :)


(This post was edited by johanson on Jun 9, 2009, 8:00 PM)


esperanza

Jun 9, 2009, 8:57 PM

Post #29 of 39 (5148 views)

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Re: [jfurgers] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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You must live in another universe or something.People in DF ARE NOT NICE. The most materialistic people I've EVER come across. Here in Villa Olimpica they are VERY rude. I know it's not popular to say bad things about Mexico since so many who teach here are American haters.
Say what you want about the States...but Mexico!!! How dare one! Maybe it's just the south part of the city where I live. People here are 'educated" yet rude and cold.People in the States are MUCH nicer.

It's often been said that folks get back pretty much what they give out. If you're as rude in person as you are here on Mexconnect, it's not surprising at all that you get back the same rudeness you give out.




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Hound Dog

Jun 9, 2009, 11:53 PM

Post #30 of 39 (5134 views)

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Re: [Gringal] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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Dawg: Did that tequila make it?

I like the way you cut through to the important stuff, Gringal. Yes,my woderful Herradura Blanco made it to Paris and La Rochelle with the Dawg thanks to the outstanding service of American Airlines personnel in Chicago. They searched the airport for the right sized boxes with which to check my tequila and even helped me properly package my treasure. My French relatives love great tequila and were most appreciative of those gifts. Really good blanco tequila is hard to find here and damned expensive if you do find it. Good wine, on the other hand, is a bargain as is an outstanding bagette and French soft ripened cheese to die for so if any of you are contemplating trips to Paris, I recommend you bring a corkscrew and knife (checked through, of course) and find yourself a park bench for dining al fresco. Do not, however, try to sleep overnight on the Metru. They are on to that.

We had that sushi yesterday in Paris fancy 16th Arondissement in a sushi bar reputed by some to be the best in Paris and which is the size of a postage stamp. A modest sushi selection along with a Japanese beer and tiny glass of sake set us back Fifty Eight Euros (mas o menos Seventy Two Dollars) . Oh well, what we ate cannot be found in Guadalajara so we grabbed the opportunity as it arose.


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on Jun 10, 2009, 2:12 AM)


db52

Jun 10, 2009, 6:47 AM

Post #31 of 39 (5118 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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Since I had to go buy milk anyway, I thought I'd take Esperanza's shopping list along with me, since I thought her $47 grocery bill looked a bit fishy. At my neighborhood Kroger here in Shelby Township, Michigan, I found:

6 eggs-89 cents
1 lb. butter-1.69
6 bagels-1.69
1/2 lb. cheddar-2.19
gal. water-99 cents
small can coffee-3.49
cantaloupe-2.48 (!)
2L pepsi-84 cents
pint 1/2 & 1/2-89 cents
total=$15.15

Are you sure you did not accidentally buy a can of the expensive coffee harvested from the feces of the Asian palm civet?


NEOhio1


Jun 10, 2009, 9:49 AM

Post #32 of 39 (5089 views)

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Re: [db52] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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db52 I do understand what you are saying about costs, but as a former midwesterner I have realized that we never paid anywhere near what other parts of the country pay for food. I don't know why that is. I absolutely sometimes miss Kroger and occasionally go to our Cleveland grocer Giant Eagle website just to peruse and remember the old days of grocery shopping. Now when we go to Baltimore to visit family, what you listed would cost around $60 - butter at $3.75 to $4.50, a gallon of milk is almost $5, a box of cereal is $6, $2.50 for a head of iceberg, and $1 for two oranges. Then we go to the Kosher butchershop and that is really obscene. So Esperanzas shopping costs in Southern California don't surprise me.

This is why our budget and costs here in Mexico are not much different than they were in Ohio. People who move here for reduced cost of living do so from high cost areas, they see the most change in their monthly budgets. Those of us from the midwest do not experience that change and so I always tell people coming here from the midwest to be careful if they expect cheaper living here, its really more of a lateral move for midwesterners.

We are travelling to the US for 9 weeks in July and August to Baltimore and then a road trip thru Ohio and southeastern Michigan. I am looking forward to Kroger for a change. I wonder though when I will be overwhelmed with those stores. My sister-in-law has lived in Sydney Australia for her entire adult life, 40 years now, and on a trip to visit us in Cleveland in the late 80s she went off the the Giant Eagle grocery, only to return 30 minutes later having left a basket with the manager. She was overwhelmed by the size, variety and visual and auditory noise in the superstore. She was used to stores for the fowl man, the green grocer, the baker and the butcher, etc...we laughed at her, but I experienced the same thing last year when I went in a Dillards department store after 4 years. I had to leave, it was all just too much. What a surprise that was but it also was wonderful because leaving that hustle bustle craziness was just what this move was all about.


ken_in_dfw

Jun 10, 2009, 11:14 AM

Post #33 of 39 (5066 views)

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Re: [NEOhio1] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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NEOhio1, your comments about the cost of living in the Midwest and how that translates for Mexico can be applied equally for those of us living in the south-central US (Arkansas, Oklahoma, Texas, Louisiana). Food costs are much lower here than on the coasts, too.

The one exception to that I can make would be for us poor homeowners in the state of Texas. And, in that case, the difference in property taxes and homeowners insurance will easily dwarf all other savings.

You have no idea what shades of green I turn every time I hear about one of you mention your piddly-to-less-than-$500 annual property taxes! And I'm sorry, but if you're paying less than 2500 pesos for property taxes annually, I call that piddly. It's only been Señor Bubba's recent accounts of French property taxes that have soothed my savaged breast - and pocketbook.


Oscar2

Jun 10, 2009, 12:16 PM

Post #34 of 39 (5050 views)

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Re: [db52] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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Quote
Are you sure you did not accidentally buy a can of the expensive coffee harvested from the feces of the Asian palm civet?




The civet, the coffee beans, and ultimately the coffee itself rings load and clear in memory of a day last year while sitting in an open-air coffee hut in Bali where the “Kopi Luwak” coffee bean was cultivated, roasted, and sold to the entire world.

I initially got wind of this coffee in a little/huge movie with Jack Nicholson and Morgan Freeman called The Bucket List. Great/fun movie, which introduced the ravings of Jack Nicholson over his elaborate golden urn/coffee maker, which he boasts to Morgan Freeman as the apparatus which exudes and fills the air with the essence of the best coffee in the world. His jaw dropping adulation joined by the waving of hands, the rolling of the eyes, made one feel like if one tasted this coffee, heaven would descend upon you transforming your being into a smile of contentment for life….

While the wife, I and our driver sat sort of perched on this open air table overlooking the lush jungle-like plantation with the aroma of Kopi Luwak, punctuating the air with anticipation of its splendor touching your pallet, another American couple joined us, sort of caddy corner to our table. Of course it wasn’t hard to see the edge in their eyes glimmering WOW, I can hardly wait! The waitress comes to your table, we ordered a cup for the three of us and our neighbors adjacent to us got their Kopi Luwak at the same time.

We looked at each other, seemingly sitting on the edge of the world, and almost simultaneously our neighbors smiles joined ours in acknowledgment of The Bucket List, as we held the coffee to our noses, waived its steamy essence toward our nose, took a deep breath and looked at each other laughing, as if we were sitting next to Jack Nicholson who did the same as we savored his favorite coffee. We all got a great chuckle out of this, which kind of made the day more fun and yes, eventful.

We later found out that in some parts of the world Kopi Luwak has and can be sold from $100 too $600 a pound ……… go figure. In Bali a cup of Kopi Luwak costs 10,000 Rupiahs, which equals $1.00 dollar. Check out the photo of the civet we took while there.
Attachments: Civet-1.jpg (62.8 KB)


Gringal

Jun 10, 2009, 12:33 PM

Post #35 of 39 (5043 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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But Oscar.....how was the coffee? Divine? Worth the $100 a pound? Gotta know, for my "bucket list".


Oscar2

Jun 10, 2009, 1:09 PM

Post #36 of 39 (5030 views)

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Re: [Gringal] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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Quote
But Oscar.....how was the coffee? Divine? Worth the $100 a pound? Gotta know, for my "bucket list".



OMG, my dear Gringal, how could I have left out the superlatives which captivate the imagination, turn the palette and brighten the eyes with a pinch of excellence. My buds aren’t espresso, nor of the cultivated type, Yuban-Columbian has jaded and filled my kitchen air for decades. Kopi Luwak was musty, deep, corrosive, and thick to my light pallet. It churned with tightness of cultured flavor streaming through the innards of a beast gifting his drop for us to clench our jaws and say AHH, such flavor is ……….. :-)


husker

Jun 10, 2009, 1:15 PM

Post #37 of 39 (5028 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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Here in Texas we went to the farmers maket and bought 6 tomatoes, 4 ears of corn, a cantalope, a small watermelon,bag of green grapes, 3 mangos, 2 pounds of strawberries to the tune of $40 us


esperanza

Jun 10, 2009, 2:42 PM

Post #38 of 39 (5011 views)

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Re: [husker] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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Here in Morelia, we went to our neighborhood tianguis (a little like a farmers' market) this morning and bought:

6 large fresh white onions
1 huge cantaloupe
4 big mangoes
6 red-ripe tomatoes
1/2 lb mushrooms
1 big avocado
2 large bananas
1 large papaya
1.5 lb fresh green beans
8 hot-out-of-the-oven bolillos

Total cost: 150 pesos--the equivalent of about $11.00 USD.




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TlxcalaClaudia

Jun 11, 2009, 4:06 PM

Post #39 of 39 (4930 views)

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Re: [Georgia] Just back from a month in upstate New York

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I sooo relate. Missing Mexico.
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