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mazbook1


Apr 3, 2009, 12:20 PM

Post #26 of 36 (7263 views)

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Re: [Rolly] Como se dice "plumber"?

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Rolly,

Although there really isn't a GOOD Mexican Spanish Dictionary, the University of Chicago English-Spanish Spanish-English Dictionary, (5th Edition!) has more "Mexican Spanish" than nearly any other I have found. Certainly it's the best in pocketbook size. And it's available in full size (for easier reading) too.

I use a BIG dictionary often, the Velázquez Spanish and English Dictionary from Velázquez Press, a subsidiary of Academic Learning Company. This one has very nearly ALL of the Mexican Spanish words, but you can't use its pronunciation guide, as it is pure castellano. The drawback to this dictionary is that it is 8 X 9.5 and nearly 3 inches thick weighing 5.5 lbs. Not something you use for everyday lookup.


La Isla


May 7, 2009, 9:56 PM

Post #27 of 36 (7207 views)

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Re: [mazbook1] Como se dice "plumber"?

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My favorite bilingual dictionary is the Collins Spanish-English English-Spanish Dictionary, both the hard cover edition and the online version, which I use a lot when doing translations and teaching English to more advanced students. It provides a good balance between Peninsular Spanish and Latin American Spanish vocabulary and usage. My favorite Spanish Spanish dictionary is the Larousse, with a new edition brought out every year. By now it's a veritable encyclopedia of language and facts and maps and all sorts of other information!

When I lived in Spain I learned that plumber was fontanero, a new word for me as I had always thought it was plomero. Reading this thread, it was interesting to learn that fontanero is also used in some parts of Mexico. And according to Collins, plumber is gasfitero in Chile.


ken_in_dfw

May 9, 2009, 10:12 AM

Post #28 of 36 (7172 views)

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Re: [La Isla] Como se dice "plumber"?

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I'll second that comment about the Collins Unabridged. It's the best dictionary I've found by far, with very clear descriptions of how words are used in different ways depending on the country.

The other thing that has impressed me about this dictionary is its extensive listing of modismos or sayings. I have two books that supposedly specialize in expressions, but the Collins is more thorough and more accurate.


La Isla


May 9, 2009, 10:38 AM

Post #29 of 36 (7170 views)

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Re: [kenhjr] Como se dice "plumber"?

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I was first introduced to the Collins dictionary back in the 1990s when I was working on an MA in Latin American Studies at NYU and also working as a Graduate Assistant to earn my keep. My fellow GA was a Spaniard, who was also familiar with Latin American Spanish. He was asked by our boss to buy a good bilingual dictionary for the department. Being a model scholar-in-training, he spent several hours checking out all the dictionaries for sale in the university bookstore and finally decided that the Collins was the best. Following his example, I bought one for my own library and became so enamored of it that I included it in the last box of books I shipped down here a couple of months ago.


JR

May 18, 2009, 11:26 AM

Post #30 of 36 (7137 views)

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Re: [La Isla] Como se dice "plumber"?

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I would also recommend (Harper)Collins, especially the large, "Unabridged" one. Last year I briefly compared Larousse, Oxford, and (Harper)Collins, and I was surprised at how good they all were. I noticed no real big differences. Only later, looking for more obscure words or usages, did I note that (Harper)Collins was a bit better.

Carron, according to (Harper)Collins, a female sheep is indeed an "oveja." A female lamb, however, is a "borrega." You used both English words in your post.

As for Mexican words and usage, I use the Spanish-Spanish dictionary published by the Colegio de México: Diccionario de español usual en México, 1996. It is about 950 pages and includes regular words like "plomero," not just Mexicanisms. It even gives sample sentences or phrases: "llamar al plomero."


La Isla


May 18, 2009, 1:29 PM

Post #31 of 36 (7125 views)

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Re: [JR] Como se dice "plumber"?

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In Reply To


As for Mexican words and usage, I use the Spanish-Spanish dictionary published by the Colegio de México: Diccionario de español usual en México, 1996. It is about 950 pages and includes regular words like "plomero," not just Mexicanisms. It even gives sample sentences or phrases: "llamar al plomero."


JR, thanks for the tip about the Colegio de México dictionary. No need to buy a copy because it´s available on-line at

http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/servlet/SirveObras/35716130101359941976613/p0000021.htm


esperanza

May 18, 2009, 3:32 PM

Post #32 of 36 (7116 views)

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Re: [La Isla] Como se dice "plumber"?

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Clickable link: http://www.cervantesvirtual.com/...1976613/p0000021.htm

I've been using this online dictionary, recommended to me by the wonderful and much-missed Don Quevedo, for nearly 10 years.


http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









JR

May 18, 2009, 3:33 PM

Post #33 of 36 (7116 views)

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Re: [La Isla] Como se dice "plumber"?

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Thanks. And I see that esperanza already posted that link. My bad. There is a more slender tome that is also useful, published by the Academia Mexicana/Fondo de Cultura Económica, but it is of Mexicanisms. Only things like "chela" or "temascal". Also, plants and animals and cities and regions. It's called the Diccionario Breve de Mexicanismos, and it's also available online. Came in handy numerous times in Mexico, like when after I told my friends there was a small "lagartija" in my apartment. "Oh, a 'cuija'". "A what?" Only when I got home could I verify it in this book: "cuija. (Quizá del náhuatl cohuixin.) f. Cierta lagartija pequeña."

http://www.academia.org.mx/dicmex.php


La Isla


May 18, 2009, 4:46 PM

Post #34 of 36 (7107 views)

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Re: [JR] Como se dice "plumber"?

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Thanks for the link. I've just added it to the "dictionaries" folder in my bookmarks.


MazDee

Jun 8, 2009, 8:34 PM

Post #35 of 36 (7046 views)

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Re: [Carron] Como se dice "plumber"?

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I looked up "ewe" in my Larousse and it is the same as yours. But, I love this dictionary, which usually shows me national differences. I think they just don't have enough space to include all the national, especially all the Mexican versions, of every word. How could they? "Ewe" is not a word that most of us would look up, verdad? But, I'll bet that the farmer you are talking to will recognize the word from Larousse, which I have forgotten already, even if it is not common. The same goes for camion/autobus. If you say you want to take a camion to someplace, they are not going to assume you want to take an 18 wheeler. Here in Mazatlán it seems to me those words are used indiscriminately, but there is no problem understanding. Oh, and "plomero" is easy! It sounds like plummer, which is easy to remember. And I bet if you went to the outer regions of civilization in México, and asked for a plomero, somebody would understand. So, learn the local terms if you can. Don't sweat it if you can't! The dictionary, however old, is your friend when in need. Dee


Papirex


Jun 8, 2009, 9:26 PM

Post #36 of 36 (7041 views)

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Re: [Rolly] Como se dice "plumber"?

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I have several English-Spanish dictionaries. One of the most useful is the Merriam-Websters which includes Latin-American Spanish. ISBN # 0-87779-916-4 It's a paperback, it is about 4 1/8”X6 3/4”X 1 1/8” thick. I've had it for 10 or 15 years, I,m not sure when it was published or if it is still available.


Like most of them, some words cannot be found, that's why I have 5 or 6 English-Spanish dictionaries but it is pretty good. I also have a couple of Langenschiedt,s English-Spanish dictionaries published in Germany. One of them is shirt pocket sized, it is very abbreviated. I carry it in my backpack with my laptop computer when I travel. It saved my bacon this February when I was visiting my family in California.


I was talking to one of my sons about cooking. I have been around Spanish for so long that I could not think of the English word for ajo. I had to look up ajo to tell him I was talking about garlic.


We have a friend in Anchorage that is originally from México. She used to always say, “I don't speak Spanish, I speak Castellano.” (Castilian.)


Rex
"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo
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