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jreboll

Apr 4, 2009, 4:57 PM

Post #51 of 85 (12697 views)

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Re: [Giamarie] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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I've lived all over the USA (right now living in Texas) and I have seen many places here like you describe.
Do in Mexico what you would do NOB. Struggle to move up and out.


Gringal

Apr 5, 2009, 12:45 PM

Post #52 of 85 (12648 views)

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Re: [jreboll] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Your suggestion is correct about moving up and out.

My question is: How did she arrive at this situation? People move to Mexico for as many reasons as there are people moving. It's economic necessity (can't make it on the pension/income/savings in the states), desire for adventure and a new way of life, love (fell in love and moved where the lover/ spouse wanted to be), wanted to live in an authentic Mexican environment and be far from other gringos....and many variations. I am wondering which motivation this poster had. Just plain curious.


La Isla


Apr 5, 2009, 4:15 PM

Post #53 of 85 (12623 views)

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Re: [Gringal] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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I have the same questions about Giamarie's situation as Gringal does. Why on earth did you choose to move to such an unpleasant (and unhealthy, especially for your child) place? Was it the only thing available in your price range? I do wish you luck on getting out of there and into a more agreeable living situation!


Giamarie

Apr 7, 2009, 12:22 AM

Post #54 of 85 (12565 views)

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Re: [La Isla] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Guess I'd better do some explaining. I sort of figured this post would raise a few eyebrows. I came down to Mexico in my mid-twenties ( I'm 30 now) for an adventure, to teach English and then figured I'd move back to the States after about a year. But...............I fall in love with a Mexican guy, and what do you know, get pregnant a little less than a year into our relationship. Hey I don´t regret this. I love my daughter soooo much. She turned 2 in February. I also love my boyfriend, Jaime.

I just recently came back to Mexico after living with my folks and caring for our daughter for two years while Jaime worked hard to pay off debts, promote his business, fix up the house, etc. For a little over a year of that time I was working as well. During that time he did visit me in Michigan three times on his tourist visa. He was there with me in Michigan when she was born.

Right before I met him he had bought a little house that looks like a typical Mexican house in a typical Mexican neighborhood. Two little bedrooms, a bathroom, and one main room that has a kitchen area at one end and the other end is our dining area-living room. Now that it has fresh plaster covering all the cracks, fresh paint, and tile covering the whole floor it is much more comfortable.

That was my condition for coming back to Mexico. Either the house fixed up or we move to an apartment. I kept pressing for the apartment (hopefully in a more attractive area) and that sure caused some heated debates, and revealed some personal ( and perhaps cultural ) differences that are probably deeply ingrained. No apartment, no way, Jose.

So he fixed it up for us, eventually. I wasn't being too demanding either, considering how much I had helped him out. ( we won´t even go there!!! )

He bought the place because it seemed ok to him for the price and he loved the huge backyard. He didn´t care what the neighborhood looked like.

I came into this relationship with little so I couldn´t buy us a better house in a better area or anything.

I should describe the neighborhood a little better. It isn´t one of the worst I´ve seen or even close. It is your middle of the road Mexican neighborhood where some people have pretty nice places and other people live in one little broken down room with a tin roof, or in houses of unadorned cinderblock. Some of the streets in the neighborhood are paved. Ours isn't. Quite a few of the houses are in various stages of construction. People build on when they can. Lots of people stack up sand and bricks and you have to dogde their piles when walking down the road. Little ma and pa stores everywhere, farmacias, minisupers, vulcanizadores, comedores, puestos de comida, etx. People sell stuff out of their house. You all know the kind of neighborhood I´m talking about if you've spent time in Mexico.

Jaime would move to a different city if he were sure he could find decent work there. I suppose we won´t go through the hassle of changing houses until we can move somewhere else entirely.

We also live with his adolescent son from a previous relationship. So some things complicate the picture.

We have talked about moving to San Cristobal de Las Casas in several years if we can save enough money to have a small business of some sort.

We also have talked of moving to the US for a few years once his son ( going on 14 ) finishes highschool. ( Still 4 years down the road ).

We are doing alright. I wish the neighborhood was a little prettier, and I wish Tuxtla wasn't so damn hot, but oh well. Sorry if I made it sound like our situation was hopeless. And sorry about the long post. It's a long story and hard to explain breifly.

Giamarie


Gringal

Apr 7, 2009, 7:48 AM

Post #55 of 85 (12537 views)

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Re: [Giamarie] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Since I raised the question....thanks for the answer. I suspected it was about love. What can I say? Love has caused me to live in curious circumstances on occasion. lol.


Here's wishing you the best of luck in the future.


La Isla


Apr 7, 2009, 12:40 PM

Post #56 of 85 (12503 views)

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Re: [Giamarie] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Hi Giamarie. It sounds like you're in the midst of a complicated situation, and I hope that love (for both your daughter and her father) will help you make the best of things. When you need to vent, your new friends at Mexconnect will be here to listen. And be sure to let us know when things take a turn for the better!


roni_smith


Apr 18, 2009, 8:52 AM

Post #57 of 85 (12369 views)

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Re: [Veracruzana] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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We were amazed at the Paseo de Montejo in Merida - a boulevard with wide sidewalks for blocks upon blocks - I'll go find a photo - here is one of Kathy walking on the Paseo sidewalk. We also took a short 40 minute bus ride to Progreso, where there is a nice malecon - a couple of kilometers long, I think

More Paseo de Montejo photos here: http://web.mac.com/...%20de%20Montejo.html


------
Planning for Mexico Move Blog



Hound Dog

Apr 18, 2009, 7:27 PM

Post #58 of 85 (12310 views)

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Re: [Giamarie] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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We live in an average neighborhood which is just full of eyesores. It kills me how the neighbors across the street are selling their place for 1.5 million pesos but they have a broken up chicken wire gate, junked up side yard, and although the front facade looks nice enough, you turn by the side and see the brick and cement slop job that seems to be the norm for all construction here. Sure it's rather big, and two stories, but that's all you can say about it. However, for that kind of money, shouldn't the house be darn near perfect? We don't even live in a desirable neighborhood.

Glamarie:

I am amazed to read this. $1.5Million Pesos for what you describe in Tuxtla Gutierrez? Hard to believe. We have a home in the historic center of nearby San Cristóbal we bought two years ago and that price seems way out of line for Tuxtla. In informal searches we have found seemingly splendid homes in Tuxtla with huge tropical gardens and swimming pools and views and paved streets and fully air conditioned listed for sale in very nice areas for around $3Million Pesos or less so that price seems outrageous. Of course that´s the asking price not the "sold" price. We really like tropical Tuxtla Gutierrez versus somewhat chilly high mountain San Cristóbal. We think that city has some fine restaurants and lots to do and great scenery in the hills but $1.5Miillion Pesos for what you describe? If that is on mark, that is disappointing in a city we have thought until now was a bargain.

One of the things we definitely did not give up when we moved to Mexico in 2001 was bargain housing compared to where we lived in the states but that was the San Francisco Bay Area not Yazoo City. Let´s hope that hasn´t changed.


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on Apr 18, 2009, 7:32 PM)


brooklyn

May 6, 2009, 11:29 AM

Post #59 of 85 (12184 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Having spent quite a few months at Lakeside, I recall one thing I missed was the large selection of foreign restaurants found in so many NOB cities (Toronto, San Francisco, New York, etc.). What there was was often not done very well.

I did notice one remark by someone complaining about Mazatlan restaurants, in particular, difficulties in finding interesting shrimp dishes (odd, since Mazatlan is, of course, the shrimp capital of the world). I recall having some ho-hum Spanish food and very good pizza there, but one of my favourites was Los Arcos (just north of El Cid) which had a large sea food menu and a great variety of well prepared (at least to my taste) shrimp dishes.

But the thing I missed most, I think, in Ajijic, was the ability to dine out in the evening. So many restaurants there seem to close up tight at 7 PM or earlier.


bournemouth

May 6, 2009, 11:37 AM

Post #60 of 85 (12178 views)

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Re: [brooklyn] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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I know you do know this - but the difference in population between Ajijic and the major cities you mention is enormous. For the size of the place, it does pretty darned well. A lot of places here do seem to be programmed to the Latin hora de comida and therefore are not open in the evening.


Rolly


May 6, 2009, 11:57 AM

Post #61 of 85 (12175 views)

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Re: [bournemouth] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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How odd. In my area, while there are many restaurants open in the daytime only, most of the best ones are open only at night.

Rolly Pirate


brooklyn

May 6, 2009, 1:02 PM

Post #62 of 85 (12157 views)

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Re: [bournemouth] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Quite true. Actually, my attitude is that it's their country, not mine. I'm a guest. If they want to open their restaurants from 2 AM to 4:30 that's their business, and it's up to me to adjust.


Hound Dog

May 6, 2009, 1:55 PM

Post #63 of 85 (12144 views)

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Re: [brooklyn] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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The exchange between two of the posters above makes you wonder if either of them have actually ever been at Lakeside at least recently even though one claims she lives here.

Foreign food at restaurants at Lakeside is typically inauthentic and insipid although some food which may be described as Midwestern American watered down and bland takeoffs on various ethnic foods around the world can be found easily enough if one is not demanding as to quality. One poster must have stopped eating dinner out years ago if she thinks restaurant hours here honor a local Mexican time schedule.

I could name you countless cities the size of "Lakeside" with far superior food to this town in France and California and lots of other places.

Since our recent return to Lakeside from Chiapas we have eaten at restaurants locally praised for their Japanese, Thai, Chinese and Italian food to say nothing of Texas fried chicken and American style steakhouse cuisine and all of these places would be run out of the places they claim to represent within a fortnight. The average foreign food diner here does not know decent food and therefore the restaurant reviews of eateries featuring "foreign" or "exotic" food by self-proclaimed local restaurant critics are laughable self-parodies. This town is about as exotic as Cairo, Illinois.


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on May 6, 2009, 2:00 PM)


Gringal

May 6, 2009, 2:15 PM

Post #64 of 85 (12130 views)

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Re: [Hound Dog] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Hound Dog's general contempt for his neighbors in the Lake Chapala area is getting more pronounced lately. Perhaps his purpose is to set himself apart from the local yokels, and indeed, it does.

As Bournemouth suggests, this is not a large city, nor is it a sophisticated and affluent suburb of one; i.e. as Palo Alto is to San Francisco.

It does not follow that the locals don't know the difference between pedestrian fare and haute cuisine.

The Dawg is not the only person hereabouts who's seen Paree.


bournemouth

May 6, 2009, 2:54 PM

Post #65 of 85 (12122 views)

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Re: [Rolly] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Rolly - I didn't actually say who was open at night - and in fact the good ones are. Although there are a lot of lunch places that I would be happy to eat at in the evening, if only they were open. The truth of the matter is that we have too many eating places for the population to support - but it does give us constant turnover and new places to try but is hard on the eternal optimists who open the new places, all to soon to turn into closed places.


Hound Dog

May 6, 2009, 3:44 PM

Post #66 of 85 (12112 views)

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Re: [Gringal] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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The Dawg is not the only person hereabouts who's seen Paree.

Apparently, however, Dawg is the only person hereabouts posting on these forums who has actually eaten there.

And, incidentally Gringal, Palo Alto?





(This post was edited by Hound Dog on May 6, 2009, 3:58 PM)


Gringal

May 6, 2009, 8:14 PM

Post #67 of 85 (12060 views)

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Re: [Hound Dog] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Since you didn't take a survey, you wouldn't know the answer, would you? Some folks don't
brag about where they've been and what they've done. Some do. Constantly. Yawn.

As for Palo Alto, it's a fine place to find good food outside The City. As are many other places you may not have graced with fork in hand.

Meanwhile, back to Mexico. Now why do you expect to find superb cuisine from nations thousands of miles away, in Mexico??? We are in Mexico, aren't we....last time I looked.? In fact, we are in a small provincial enclave heavily populated by fine, intelligent, often well-traveled people from all over the U.S.A, from sea to shining sea. Without them, Pancho would go broke waiting for Bubba to buy out all his exotic (for here) stuff at Superlake.

What do I miss? Indian food in Fremont, CA


brooklyn

May 7, 2009, 6:56 AM

Post #68 of 85 (12021 views)

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Re: [Gringal] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Of course, Mexico is far from some of the countries whose food some of us would like to find available in and around Ajijic.

But then, Toronto is thousands of kilometers from Hong Kong, and we have loads of excellent Chinese restaurants. Some food critics have said that the food is even better than that found in Hong Kong or Shanghai restaurants, since the quality of the raw materials is often higher.

The reason for this seems to be that Toronto is home to a large number of people from China, who know good Chinese food, and are affluent enough to patronize restaurants that prepare it.

Now, if only some of our local gourmets would be as insistent that the variety and quality of local ethnic cuisine be raised.

(This post was edited by brooklyn on May 7, 2009, 6:58 AM)


Gringal

May 7, 2009, 9:33 AM

Post #69 of 85 (11995 views)

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Re: [brooklyn] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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The next time a group of "snowbirds" flies south, could they possibley bribe a good Chinese, Thai or Vietnamese chef to come on down and open a restaurant here? You would be a hero.


brooklyn

May 7, 2009, 11:04 AM

Post #70 of 85 (11969 views)

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Re: [Gringal] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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I'd love to find a restaurant on the Carretera serving a plate of Pad Thai, or a big bowl of Pho, preferably at Toronto prices ($6.00 Canadian for a big bowl of Pho). And, yes, at about 8 PM.


La Isla


May 7, 2009, 11:37 AM

Post #71 of 85 (11962 views)

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Re: [brooklyn] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Here in the D.F. there are lots of inexpensive Chinese restaurants, mostly of the buffet, all-you-can-eat variety. I've eaten at a few and have found the food to be greasy and rather tasteless, though the Mexican customers tkae care of the latter problem by piling on the chile. Of course, there's nothing like hot Chinese mustard available to spice up the food. I think this is because the food is made to cater to Mexican tastes, not my tastes or Chinese tastes. Oh, I do miss the fabuous Chinese food so easy to find in the Chinatowns of Philadelphia, New York City and even in the 'burbs where my mother lives.


Hound Dog

May 7, 2009, 11:45 AM

Post #72 of 85 (11959 views)

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Re: [brooklyn] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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I'd love to find a restaurant on the Carretera serving a plate of Pad Thai, or a big bowl of Pho, preferably at Toronto prices ($6.00 Canadian for a big bowl of Pho). And, yes, at about 8 PM.

Dream on brooklyn. While we are at it:
*Fool Madamas as one would find in Alexandria
*Injera and Wat as one would find in Addis Ababa
*A great tagine one would find in Algiers.
*A gyro bought on the streets of Athens from a street vendor
*French fries from a modest take-out storefront or candied almonds freshly and aromatically cooked by Arabs working Blvd. St. Michel on Paris´ Left Bank
*Tacos from a whorehouse/truckstop at the Chiapas/Oaxaca line
*Marimba music at the Marimba Municipal Park in Centro Tuxtla Gutierrez while swilling an ice cold XX Lager
*A BBQ pork sandwich with hot sauce and icy cold Pabst Blue Ribbon at some redneck cafe in the Alabama outback
*Madras curry of indescribable spiciness in Southeastern India
*Kosher Tunisian cous cous in Paris´ Orthodox Jewish Belleville District with dry rose wine from Tunisia while your luncheon companion, a Tunisian Jew, tries to pick up your French Catholic wife while you, a Southern Presbyterian, think their main interest is the food as is yours and he was a cute guy so perhaps I was upset he wasn´t trying to pick me up but that is another subject
*Other endless variations of the same theme never to be achieved and if ever achieved never to meet expectations.

I´ll tell you what, brooklyn. We could have retired to any number of places with better food that the Lake Chapala area but the climate here is fantastic and grocery suppliers unequaled in North America except maybe in Metropolitan Toronto or New York or Los Angeles or Mexico City so just realize this is a great place to retire and further that you can make your own Injera and Wat here from ingredients available at Lakeside so I say live out your life here and keep a second place to which to run when you simply cannot stand it any longer.









(This post was edited by Hound Dog on May 7, 2009, 12:43 PM)


johanson


May 7, 2009, 1:53 PM

Post #73 of 85 (11927 views)

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Re: [Hound Dog] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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What do I miss most lakeside? A high class restaurant where I can order a "Whopper". But I understand that's changing. Apparently the new almost completed shopping center just north of Wall*Mart will have a Burger King.

And a triple Whopper with cheese has only 1230 calories per http://www.bk.com/...on/PDFs/brochure.pdf

I guess I will have to stick to the Whopper Jr which is closer to 400 calories


Gringal

May 7, 2009, 2:17 PM

Post #74 of 85 (11922 views)

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Re: [johanson] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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Someday I'm going to figure out what the Whopper secret ingredient is. The thing that creates longing; not just for a "good" burger (which, considering the cruddy meat used by Burger King, cannot be). is it that smoke flavor from a shaker? a good shot of MSG? Something else?

I just made burgers the other night. I used the best Angus beef, fresh tomatoes, top drawer mayo and excellent cheese. Put Worchesteshire sauce on 'em. Had the Lawry's shaker on the table.

They were good. But somehow, they still weren't.....WHOPPERS. What is it?

However, of things I miss....it's not the Whopper. It the In 'n Out burgers. With the great fries, nowhere to be found in Mexico. Sigh.


BajaGringo


May 7, 2009, 3:35 PM

Post #75 of 85 (11904 views)

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Re: [Gringal] What was the hardest thing to give up when you moved to Mexico?

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I am not sure if I come even close to the whopper secret recipe but I do get lots of folks who rave over my burgers, gringos and amigos.

I season the hamburger meat with salt, pepper, onion salt and garlic salt. I sprinkle in a small amount of fine, dried onion flakes and mix it all together well. I leave it in the fridge over night before cooking them on a very hot grill.

The other "secrets" to my burgers are to toast the buns on the grill with a bit of butter and use my secret sauce as a spread. Now THAT, will remain a secret...




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