Mexico Connect
Forums  > General > Living, Working, Retiring
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All


Georgia


Apr 20, 2009, 12:04 PM

Post #1 of 47 (8761 views)

Shortcut

Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
So, here's a question: assuming your ethnicity is not Hispanic, what do you all think are ways to "look like a Mexican" when you dress? I'm particularly addressing my inquiry to city dressing, not country dressing.

Some areas for the ladies to consider: hair cut, color, makeup, shoes, purses, clothing, jewelry and certain discreet cultural factors.
For the gentlemen: see above list; skip the makeup.

There are times people are not sure what I am. My ethnic background is European, including Spain, but that's not what has them wondering as one young man once asked me, "Are you from here or from there?"



Anonimo

Apr 20, 2009, 12:18 PM

Post #2 of 47 (8754 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Georgia] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
I just don't concern myself with this. I am what I am.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


Georgia


Apr 20, 2009, 12:37 PM

Post #3 of 47 (8746 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Anonimo] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
Well, I didn't mean this as a concern, but sort of as a fun observation of the differences in choices. Think of the typical stereotype of the American tourist and work from there! A friend of ours, a Mexican, returned from the US and met us in cargo shorts, a Hawaiian shirt and untied jogging shoes .... we teased him unmercifully that he had turned into a gringo. It was a hoot!


Brigitte Ordoquy

Apr 20, 2009, 12:59 PM

Post #4 of 47 (8739 views)

Shortcut

Post deleted by Brigitte Ordoquy | Private Reply
 


esperanza

Apr 20, 2009, 1:00 PM

Post #5 of 47 (8738 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Georgia] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply

In Reply To
Some areas for the ladies to consider: hair cut, color, makeup, shoes, purses, clothing, jewelry and certain discreet cultural factors.
For the gentlemen: see above list; skip the makeup.

And maybe the purse, although the 'man bag' is quite popular in such cities as Mexico City, Guadalajara and Morelia--as is the morral.


http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









RickS


Apr 20, 2009, 1:21 PM

Post #6 of 47 (8725 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Brigitte Ordoquy] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
OK, Dawg, what I'm trying to figure out is how this story fit into Georgia's topic? Surely youse is not trying to suggest that, after all the other white bankers left the table and you were the only white one left, the black guys thought you were 'one of them'!?!

Color me confused.

P.S. If posting under the new nom de plume was intended to provide cover..... it ain't gonna work!


Gringal

Apr 20, 2009, 1:25 PM

Post #7 of 47 (8722 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Brigitte Ordoquy] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
 
All tongue-in-cheeking aside, Georgia...........I think we should just be ourselves instead of trying to look like someone from another culture. Those who attempt it generally look....strange.

We don't need to look like we're dressing out of the J.Crew catalog and get a unisex haircut if we're female.. There are many ways for women to look good while being comfortable in these parts.
Men: same thing.

(This post was edited by Gringal on Apr 20, 2009, 1:31 PM)


Brigitte Ordoquy

Apr 20, 2009, 1:38 PM

Post #8 of 47 (8716 views)

Shortcut

Post deleted by Brigitte Ordoquy | Private Reply
 


Willie1

Apr 20, 2009, 1:47 PM

Post #9 of 47 (8710 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Brigitte Ordoquy] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
When my hair used to be quite a bit longer, I could wear it "up" and one day while standing in front of Bancomer, a lady came up to me and started speaking to me in Spanish, even though I am as white as Wonder Bread! I was so thrilled to have been taken for a local BUT the minute I opened my mouth, the gig was up...jejeje. Now I just try to dress similarly as the locals and look appropiate to the occasion.
I would love to wear the regional dress fo many parts of the country and at times, I do but for the most part you do not see any of the women around Mazatlan wearing the indigenous styles unless to a special party.

Willie


Gringal

Apr 20, 2009, 1:55 PM

Post #10 of 47 (8704 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Brigitte Ordoquy] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
Both the Italian movie and the banking example cited by the Dawg date back to the 1970's. This does not mean that the examples have no relevancy to today's issues, but society does change in a 40 year period.

Our local publications contain current examples of reportage and articles by expats referring to the Gringo population in a matter of fact way as "Gringos". No offense was intended and I doubt any was taken.

I have had a few female acquaintances who got quicksanded into the PC terms insisted upon in the womens' movement back in the 70's. You could not even call a woman a "lady" without being chastised. Thank hevvins there was a mellowing out in the last four decades. Some of them are still at it, though.

Georgia's topic is about another matter entirely. Trying to pass for Mexican. Maybe we can also talk about Mexicans who dye their hair blond because????? Beats me. I think everyone looks just fine the way they are.

(This post was edited by Gringal on Apr 20, 2009, 2:02 PM)


Gringal

Apr 20, 2009, 2:29 PM

Post #11 of 47 (8685 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Willie1] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
Had a chuckle over that one, Willie. I still have long hair and wear it "up" since it's easier for me to take care of and cooler in the summer months. And, like you, my jig was up when I was addressed in Spanish.

The toughest thing about acquiring facility in the language is that when I get up my courage and address someone....the response comes back at blinding speed. HELP!

I imagine that the Mexicans going to the states have the same problem in reverse.

The great thing about humanity, though, is that when people really want and need to communicate, they do manage. Not perfectly, perhaps, but well enough.


Georgia


Apr 20, 2009, 2:41 PM

Post #12 of 47 (8676 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Gringal] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
Well, I suppose you all missed my point, which is kind of the ability to laugh at ourselves and the cultural "norms" in Mexico vs. the US. When I was a kid I lived in Spain. (Part of my background is family in Cadiz.) One of the most popular plays at the time involved an American family living in Madrid. The audience howled when the American husband came out on stage wearing madras Bermudas and sat down with his family to eat dinner in the kitchen while the maids ate in the dining room. (Commonly referred to in local real estate ads as the "dinning room" which in the case of my family which is vast (we have 10 kids) is an absolutely accurate description of the place where we all ate each night.)

Anyway ... I'm not talking about ethnic dress or any of that. Just the differences in appearance choices that set us apart ... and are often amusing. Not racism. Not pointing nasty fingers, just a chuckle at our varying sense of "fashion."

Example: I despise wearing hats. I am having some issues with my skin and have to stay out of the sun. I don't want to stay out of the sun. So, when I'm meandering about in Tlaquepaque I carry an umbrella of small size (so it will fit between the buildings and the telephone poles on the sidewalk). My Mexican girlfriend saw me one day and commented that I looked like some "old Mexican lady" troopsing along with my black umbrella. I replied that my next step would be to have a heavy henna job on my gray roots. It was not taken as anything but friendly twitter and we chuckled. That kind of thing.

But I guess we can't laugh at ourselves .... too bad. I am strongly in the camp of being politically incorrect at times.


Gringal

Apr 20, 2009, 2:56 PM

Post #13 of 47 (8661 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Georgia] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
I don't know about others, but my take on Georgia's point was that we shouldn't take ourselves too seriously in this country.... or anywhere else.

We're all a bit awkward living in a new country where we haven't a clue much of the time. That's no crime. Most of our ancestors arrived in the U.S. speaking a foreign language well and English poorly. Plus, they usually dressed "funny" and were utterly clueless about the folks who were already here. I have family pictures that are a never-ending source of smiles.

Very few of us are likely to pass for anything other than what we are. So, we should relax and have a laugh on ourselves when we can. Good for the health.


Rolly


Apr 20, 2009, 3:09 PM

Post #14 of 47 (8654 views)

Shortcut

Re:Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
I wear a hat almost all the time. Around here only farmers/ranchers wear hats (not caps), so I have been asked several time if I live on a rancho.

Rolly Pirate


Georgia


Apr 20, 2009, 3:29 PM

Post #15 of 47 (8638 views)

Shortcut

Re: [esperanza] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
My husband bought his "man bag" 21 years ago in Ecuador. Still in good shape - and very convenient when he has documents to carry. Somehow in upstate New York it was not a suitable fashion statement. He took a lot of heat for it plus his pony tail which absolutely turned the local country folk frothy at the mouth - some volunteered to cut it for him, one guy in a hotel elevator in Texas actually asked him how much he save a year on haircuts. What a shame he didn't have his "man bag" with him - he could have smacked the guy with it!

His Mexican dress suit has no vent in the back, like US jackets or Italian ones (which have TWO - must be all that garlic, but I digress....) anyway at a recent family wedding there was much discussion about his weird suit ... and his little pointy loafers.


Hound Dog

Apr 20, 2009, 5:14 PM

Post #16 of 47 (8615 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Gringal] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
Both the Italian movie and the banking example cited by the Dawg date back to the 1970's.

You will recall, of course, Gringal darlin that most of us posting around here were in our vigorous and exuberant youths in the 70s (and I don´t mean that as if we were actually "in" a youth if you get my drift although that was a constant and even lauditory goal in those days while we were ourselves young and in flower)during which time the movie The Garden of The Finzi-Continis (or whatever) was filmed. The movie was about a wealthy Italian family who lost everything to the nazis but refused to believe the inevitable destruction of the family as do we all rather foolishly. My darlin wife whom I admire and respect beyond my ability to express that emotion, decided that I had used indiscretionary powers in posting under her name controversial positions and she elected to erase all of my erudite soundings so some of your responses may sound like barking at the wind but that´s your problem now isn´t it?


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on Apr 20, 2009, 6:17 PM)


Gringal

Apr 20, 2009, 6:15 PM

Post #17 of 47 (8602 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Hound Dog] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
ROFLMAO. Your darlin' wife had a point when she deleted your wolf-in-lambs coat....

Barkin' at the wind is somewhat refreshing. Unless the "wind" is of another's "breaking".

Now y'all behave yourself and post under your own colors so the mod can delete you on your own merits, if so deserved.

I believe I saw that movie, but at our age, m'dear, we have to google to remember the plot. Just for nostalgia's sake, remember that sweet little Surf Theatre with all the foreign movies in S.F.?
They even had fresh popcorn, instead of the stuff they repop in a machine after importing it from Taiwan on a slow freighter.


morgaine7


Apr 20, 2009, 7:11 PM

Post #18 of 47 (8587 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Georgia] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
Well, I look obviously foreign and am taller than most Mexicans of either gender, so I don't even try to "pass". Nor do I color my graying hair as most Mexican women do here. My car doesn't have AC, so I'm usually pretty windblown by the time I get anywhere, and I dress on the casual side, in much looser clothing than is common among Mexican women. Still, while no one is likely to take me for a Mexican, I don't seem to attract stares or be mistaken for a tourist.

For men, it seems almost more difficult. Shorts or a beard almost always indicate a foreigner, at least in my area. Ditto for clean white tennis shoes with sweat socks.

"I'm a tourist" garb: Tevas, fanny packs, big floppy hats or those things that cover the neck in the back. Ditto for having a tan in winter, when we locals are in North Pole gear.

We're giving a lot of attention to looks, but there are other ways of calling attention to oneself. I've noticed over the years ... not only in Mexico ... that Americans abroad tend to speak very loudly in public. I don't think it's intentional, so I consciously try to avoid doing it. Also, as far as I know, nowhere in the world but the US do people cut a bite of steak or whatever, put the knife down, then pick up the fork and eat with the same hand. This practice was hooted out of me by European friends back in the '70s.

Kate


Anonimo

Apr 21, 2009, 1:56 AM

Post #19 of 47 (8553 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Rolly] Re:Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
I live on a rancho, soy güero, pelón, siempre llevo sombrero. Not much chance of being mistaken for a Mexican.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


Georgia


Apr 21, 2009, 7:20 AM

Post #20 of 47 (8523 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Gringal] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
Exactly, Grangal. I was raised in both cultures, and am aware (sometimes unfortunately not) of the differences. Example: when my older daughter and I are out and about in town, we walk arm in arm. We meet and greet friends, and there is a great deal of hugging and kissing. We talk and gossip differently, and often in a very low voice. We both wear our clothing tighter than is the norm in the US. (Husband approves. Daughter said I used to look like my butt was falling off, or some such thing.) My "fancy" goin' out on the town clothing here is not appropriate for upstate New York, where we lived for some time.

Recently I had to go to three events in the north, and I truly had nothing to wear that was appropriate. Had to buy a couple of dresses. Then, again, here women of a "certain age" wear the suit. Now, I am personally not into this particular attire, but it is a double knit polyester sort of a thing with a shapeless, collarless jacket, mid calf skirt , or straight legged pants, and a blouse worn underneath. I honest to god saw a lady dressed in "the suit" -lime green - with two of her girlfriends up at the top of the mountain at El Rosario to see the Monarch butterflies. She was also wearing stockings and strappy high heeled sandals! I have no idea how she trekked up there in that outfit, but she did it. Personally, I was awestruck. She was at least my age and looked as if she were strolling through the Gran Plaza. I noticed this threesome while I wa checking my pulse.

Another difference here: at relatively dressy occasions you often see a gentleman wearing slacks and a fancy, well-ironed and starched guayabera. No suit jacket and tie. It's common throughout northern South America as well as in the Phillipines. My husband has adopted this style of dress, since he finds it more practical in this climate. He has also mastered the male to male Mexican backslap/hug.

Older Mexican women tend to wear more makeup all the time than NOB women. And both men and women are more likely to dye their hair. And then there is the footwear: have you ever seen a Mexican guy in the city whose shoes are not polished?

The plainness that many NOB women adopt is viewed by city women here as somewhat odd.

My comments are mostly in regard to city life, not village life. Although, some village women are puzzled that some perceived "wealthy" Americans for whom they clean house appear so plain.

Many of us have probably adopted some of these differences without even realizing we have done it. My bet is that most guys prefer the guayabera over the suit and tie under any and all circumstances.


Marlene


Apr 21, 2009, 2:07 PM

Post #21 of 47 (8462 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Georgia] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
The spikey heels! Definitely the heels. One of my Mexican friends emphatically told me that tennis shoes (sneakers, running shoes) were for exercising. Go figure.


Georgia


Apr 21, 2009, 2:18 PM

Post #22 of 47 (8456 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Marlene] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
It's those training wheels. And how many tourists do you see wearing high heels? I've observed lately that one of the new universals in footwear is the flip flop ... even among young people here.


Gringal

Apr 21, 2009, 2:25 PM

Post #23 of 47 (8452 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Marlene] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
LOL. I call those "Minnie Mouse" shoes. Makes a size 6 foot look like a size 10.
For the total "look", add a pair of flowered stretch capris, a belly bag and a slightly tight tee shirt.


kathleengam

Apr 21, 2009, 5:13 PM

Post #24 of 47 (8431 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Georgia] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
I confess, when I first came here to manage a plant in Mexico, the only female manager in the company, I was so overlyanxious to be identified with the global leaders' team that I did everything I could think of to "blend in" here and at the same time make myself more obviously different at corporate. Heavy, dangling chandelier earrings (before they came into style) with faux jewels were probably my most ridiculous offense. I cringe now at a picture of me making a presentation at corporate in a business suit with those heavy, cheap-looking earrings and I'd replaced the jacket with a Mayan embroidered vest. I was also fond of those bright-colored gauzey tops that looked like maternity blouses on me. I'm grateful no one laughed in my face during that first year. I'm told I was also a little heavy-handed with the spicey perfume during that time. Finally got over that stage, realized that being a pale skinned bottle blonde I was never going to completely blend in, and that was fine. I just dress now as I always have. We get a number of women visitors from corporate I've seen that over the years most of the women who work for me in Mexico have changed the way they dress and there seems to be no difference in the way they dress and the women from corporate. Haven't found a single hairdresser here that understands blonde hair, as long as it isn't flourescent peach or snow white (I've had both), I try not to get hysterical. Although I was never was tempted to mimick Mexican women's heavy makeup, particularly the dark lip liner and eye makeup, I still haven't given up the spray on sunless tan though.


Georgia


Apr 21, 2009, 7:27 PM

Post #25 of 47 (8407 views)

Shortcut

Re: [kathleengam] Clothes, Hair, and Makeup: how to "pass" for a Mexican

Can't Post | Private Reply
The hair color thing is a problem. I buy my color NOB to have my hairdresser use here. No offense taken. It's just that purple hair just doesn't look good on me.
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All
 
 
Search for (advanced search) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.4