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Jetski

Mar 21, 2009, 1:54 AM

Post #1 of 17 (11101 views)

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Sangrita and sangria

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We ran out of sangrita tequila chaser a while back so I got looking on the net for a substitute. This is an invento that we've been using but was wondering if any have other favorite blends.

Half and half clamato juice and fresh squeezed orange juice, a piece each of onion and celery, juice from a couple of squeezed limes, seasoning salt and hot sauce to taste. Blend the vegetables with juice, chill and then strain for use.

Hot sauce can be pretty much any except for those heavy in garlic or chipotle but we've been using localy made salsa Brava lately.


.


(This post was edited by Jetski on Mar 26, 2009, 6:18 PM)



esperanza

Mar 21, 2009, 12:18 PM

Post #2 of 17 (11079 views)

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Re: [Jetski] Sangrita recipe

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The best homemade sangrita I've had is made with a combination of orange and grapefruit juice, a squeeze of jugo de limón, a little salt, and toasted, finely ground chile de árbol. As you said, strain and use. Fiddle with the proportions till it tastes right to you.

No tomato juice or Clamato.

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Oscar2

Mar 21, 2009, 1:03 PM

Post #3 of 17 (11067 views)

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Re: [Jetski] Sangrita recipe

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November of 07’ while staying in Zacatecas, we went for a snack and a drink at Sanbourns. While there, a young bartender, lean, tall with tray in hand, gave us a menu, which included cocktails. Out of curiosity, I quizzed him on which of the cocktails were a favorite there and he quickly announced, “mi Sangrias son muy sabrosas y tienen buen viaje”. It was said with a genuine toothy smile, which spread across his face which seemed to almost touch the tips of his ear lobes.

I don’t know if it was his salesmen’s smile or him punctuating it by saying, “si no te gustan te trigo otra bebida,” again with that meaning to please smile. When he returned, his tray held two tall thin glasses dripping with the chill of the ice and marked off with wedged orange and lime on the edge of the glass.

We took our first sip, looked at each other and she said, this is absolutely delicious and I added, yes, and it has a nice kick to it, too! As we got half way through this Sangria, my curiosity knew I’d love to serve this same drink again and again in the future. I called the waiter/bartender over and enquired and he proudly, as if he had just won the grand prize exclaimed I used Merlot, a spot of sprite, Cointreau, a good shot of vodka, a small squeeze of lime, ice and garnished with a lime and orange rim slice.

We ordered a second one and I must add, this Sangria was not only delicious, but it had a way of smoothing things out as a head start for a nice evening….. Perhaps we’re talking about a different kind of Sangria….but that’s okay too. Laugh


Jetski

Mar 21, 2009, 1:05 PM

Post #4 of 17 (11065 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Sangrita recipe

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Thanks Esperanza, I hadn't thought of grapefruit juice but sure that's the other standard flavor for a tequila chaser. We like some of the clamato added though as it gives that nice toxic red color like the bottled Sauza sangrita but doesn't leave a stick in your throat tomato flavor. I suppose one could get the same color effect with a bit of grenadine but that isn't something normally kept in our house. Haha, more flavors to experiment with. Cheers.

Thanks Oscar, hope we don't sound like a pair of borrachos but searching for the perfect sangria is another of our passions and definitely fits on the thread. We have one mix that we got from some Chilean friends who let fruit sit in red wine overnight to build the sangria base.


(This post was edited by Jetski on Mar 21, 2009, 1:42 PM)


esperanza

Mar 21, 2009, 2:21 PM

Post #5 of 17 (11049 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] Sangrita recipe

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Oscar, we're not talking about sangría at all. We're talking about SANGRITA, a whole other thing.

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esperanza

Mar 21, 2009, 2:22 PM

Post #6 of 17 (11048 views)

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Re: [Jetski] Sangrita recipe

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Jetski, it's the chile de árbol that normally gives sangrita its red color.

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Oscar2

Mar 21, 2009, 2:44 PM

Post #7 of 17 (11040 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Sangrita recipe

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My dear SP, I believe my closing line was: Perhaps we’re talking about a different kind of Sangria….but that’s okay too. Laugh

A small contribution, which works well, and some know how to appreciate, perhaps when in the mood for something different. Si.

Anyway, I hope the story was enjoyable...........?

(This post was edited by Oscar2 on Mar 21, 2009, 2:51 PM)


Anonimo

Mar 22, 2009, 3:10 AM

Post #8 of 17 (10962 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Sangrita recipe

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Jetski, it's the chile de árbol that normally gives sangrita its red color.


I'd always thought that it was a tomato based juice or even more likely, a grenadine syrup.

I had a related drink while at El Biche Pobre 1, in Oaxaca. Sorry, can't remember the name. It had a syrup, maybe "chamoy"; either vodka or tequila, and something spicy, as in a michelada. No beer, though. It was terrific. It was decidedly red in color.

Maybe it was a "Vampiro". From Wikipedia.org:

In some areas of Mexico, it is used in a cocktail called "Vampiro" (vampire). It is served in a salt-rimmed highball glass with 3-5 ice cubes: 1.5 oz tequila, 1/2 ounce lime juice (or juice of 1/2 a small Mexican lime), 2 ounces sangrita and filled with grapefruit soda (Fresca or Squirt, sometimes omitted). For a stronger taste add a few drops of Tabasco sauce.

I Googled "sangrita recipe". Among the numerous results was this page of variations on the sangrita theme: http://www.ianchadwick.com/tequila/sangrita.htm

Provecho,
Anonimo


sergiogomez

Mar 26, 2009, 12:34 PM

Post #9 of 17 (10913 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] Sangrita recipe

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Sangría or sangrita, it sounds terrific. I've made myself a mental sticky note to try it the next time I stop by the booze store for a bottle of wine. And I love the way you tell the story, Oscar.

Speaking of sangrita, I've got a bottle of cheap pre-made stuff sitting in the back of the fridge. Stuff needs to be thrown out. It's downright nasty. Plus I haven't got any decent tequila to go with it. There's nothing like a good, homemade Mexican tequila. Not blanco, not añejo, not reposado, but somewhere delightfully in between. Which reminds me, has anyone tried a coco loco?


esperanza

Mar 26, 2009, 6:20 PM

Post #10 of 17 (10899 views)

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Re: [sergiogomez] Sangrita recipe

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OK, class, Booze 101 is now in session.

Sangría: in Mexico, sangría is generally prepared by pouring a half-glass or so of fresh-squeezed cold lemonade and floating a half-glass of red wine on top. The partaker stirs it and sips it through a straw or from the glass.

Sangrita: sangrita is the non-alcoholic chaser to a shot of tequila. It's usually made using the ingredients I posted up-thread, but some people also use tomato.

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Oscar2

Mar 26, 2009, 9:49 PM

Post #11 of 17 (10884 views)

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Re: [sergiogomez] Sangrita recipe

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Olivia, es mi gusto y gracias. Muy amable. Those same Zacatecas Sangrías have not been forgotten. If fact, last year while in a very large Mexican restaurant in Bali, and sitting at the bar, an attractive middle aged woman approached and stood right next to me and ordered a pitcher of just wine with several glasses for a cadre of friends/woman sitting at a very large circular table, laughing, chatting, and carrying-on infectiously.

I just couldn’t resist smiling at this attractive woman and enquired if she’d like a suggestion for a terrific wine drink called a Sangria. In her kind of charming Australian accent and toothy smile, her eyes lit up and she asked, is it really good, what’s in it? And as previously described, she said, boy that sounds yummy and she immediately changed her order as suggested. I really enjoy an Ozzie accent and as one of her girl friends came to the bar to scope-out what was going on between us, she got excited when she heard the Sangria contained Vodka and she put her arm around my shoulders and said why don’t you bring your drinks with you and join us.

In my usual shy manner (yea, really) Laugh when we got to the table and I was feeling pretty good, we toasted for meeting each other, we toasted Bali, Australia, the beach and then the giggles started and before you know it all 8 woman, and us had the place rocking. The Ozzie’s ordered three more pitchers of Sangria’s and in the meantime, another two women arrived that we met before, one a college professor, the other language teacher, and then all hell broke loose.

Rock and roll music had restaurant tables moved while the woman started smoking this makeshift dance floor and to the amazement of most, some of the woman got up on top of the restaurant bar and started dancing with a chorus of cheers and clapping hands. I laughed so hard and we all danced to exhaustion. The Ozzie woman and my two other friends all promised to meet on the beach where a hot group played with the backdrop of pounding surf and it was called “Blue Ocean!”

Yes, we again all met that designated evening at the Blue Ocean and had a time I will describe for another time. Needless to say, it was kicked off way back in Zacatecas, where a nice looking young waiter/bartender ingratiated us with his special Sangria which was enjoyed by the Ozzie’s on the other side of the world, Bali, Indonesia…!!





(This post was edited by Oscar2 on Mar 26, 2009, 10:22 PM)


husker

Mar 27, 2009, 8:37 AM

Post #12 of 17 (10868 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Sangrita recipe

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The use of tabasco never.. sangrita is made with Cholula. There was an article about how the Cholula empire started in Chapala. In a shed in the back yard of a home with the chile sauce left over from the production of sangrita for the local bars. Marketed first by the makers friends in small local store and grew from there. I'll look for the article and post a link when I find it.
As for the grapefruit soda only truetreat should be used.


husker

Mar 27, 2009, 9:40 AM

Post #13 of 17 (10860 views)

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Re: [husker] Sangrita recipe

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Directions
  1. 1Soak the chiles in hot water to cover for 20 minutes and then drain.
  2. 2In a blender, puree the chiles with the onion, orange juice, lime juice and salt (to taste) until thoroughly blended.
  3. 3If the mixture is too thick, add more lime and orange juice.



esperanza

Mar 27, 2009, 12:11 PM

Post #14 of 17 (10840 views)

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Re: [husker] Sangrita recipe

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The use of tabasco never.. sangrita is made with Cholula. There was an article about how the Cholula empire started in Chapala. In a shed in the back yard of a home with the chile sauce left over from the production of sangrita for the local bars. Marketed first by the makers friends in small local store and grew from there. I'll look for the article and post a link when I find it.

Is this the article?
http://mexicocooks.typepad.com/...3/salsa_cholula.html
I had the great pleasure to interview Sr. Edmundo Sánchez Nuño several years ago in Chapala.

FYI: Salsa Chapala, available everywhere at Lake Chapala and in Guadalajara, is the same as Salsa Cholula, minus the fancy wooden cap and more then several pesos less expensive.

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sergiogomez

Mar 27, 2009, 5:48 PM

Post #15 of 17 (10828 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] Sangrita recipe

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Gotta love an Aussie accent. I swear, reading that made me feel like I was out having a blast with the girls. I think they'll all flip over the sangría, which I personally prefer over sangrita. Mil veces. But seriously, Oscar, you're a darn lucky guy to drink and dance surrounded by 8 pretty ladies. I don't know a guy in any of my classes who wouldn't be envious to do the same. Shy? I wouldn't have guessed it from your posts.

I can imagine purists arguing that "real" sangría is made with wine and fresh fruit. I could care less, as long as the drink tastes good. And if I can tweak it to make it strong enough for the boy, so much the better. Even though you'd never catch him dead drinking something like sangría with his friends. The last person in the world that you want to be your bartender is the gussied-up Mexican guy standing at the back table of the party with all his friends. They make the nastiest margaritas in the world (at least, they call them margaritas). A huge shot of Cazadores in a plastic champagne glass, topped with a drunk helping of salt, lime (if there is any around), and filled to brimming with Sprite.

That's wandering pretty far from the original topic of sangrita, I guess. The fun thing about forums is that you can never tell which way a topic will go. And I, for one, am getting a kick out of this thread.


Oscar2

Mar 29, 2009, 6:14 PM

Post #16 of 17 (10727 views)

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Re: [sergiogomez] Sangrita recipe

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Olivia,

Ay ya yai, caramba, o mejor, me gustan los chistes tan sabrosos! In the brief aforementioned story on this thread, I left out what happened when the second Sangria was ordered and half way through it. By then my spirits were lifting Laugh and two young men with a nice looking familiar gal came into the lounge and sat directly to my right front on another table.

While sipping and kind of looking at this group in front of me, the perpetual Alzheimer fog started to lift and what emerged was the night before in the most unique place ever, I for one, never would have expected to find in the USA, much less Zacatecas. La Mina, if you’ve been there you’d be hard pressed not to remember. The guy sitting on the right side of the table was a medium complexion Mexican, stout and the girl to his left was the girl he had smoking the dance floor the night before at La Mina.

La Mina in Spanish means The Mine, literally. When we heard in Zacatecas, La Mina was “the hot spot” for dancing, cocktails and more, the more part, for sure, is what most would find exciting, intriguing and fun. We got there about eleven p.m., which in Mexico, is the about the earliest hour one goes nightclubbing into the wee hours of the morning.

What was really weird, off beat and really exciting was the entrance to La Mina. After parking, we walked up to the mine’s converted 4 seated mine buckets connected together on rails which was motorized up front by a small train engine. We were off, and into this seemingly forever ride into this cave/tunnel which years before had been bored into the mountain by early minors. All kinds of weird stuff goes through one’s mind, not knowing what to expect at the end of this ominous, strange place to go where one goes to boogie for the night…

The complexion of the ride changed a bit as apparently the music started and yes, the music was hot! The crescendo and it’s beat lifted expectations, but then one says to themselves, sheeez, we’re in a cave, a dark forbidding, spooky cave where possibly bats dwell, what are these people thinking…?

The music got loader as we approached where a porter dressed like a hip-hopper tended to the carts door with a buen venidos followed by a smile. The mouth of La Mina opened up into a large cavern with mood lights strategically placed to make it more of a place out of this world. The haunt and the beat grooved a place inside that began kick-starting a shake that booty feeling as you walked toward even more mood lights, caverns and bodies undulating with an appetite for more…

Waitresses where hopping tables serving cocktails to those whose smoking feet needed something to cool them. The music, the forbidden, the unknown atmosphere seized an eerie moment inside until the pounding of your heart starts feeling what your feet want to do. Getting out on the dance floor was like popping a Champaign cork and the release spews when you start moving, grooving and shaking that booty….

Back a Sanbourns, well into our second Sangria, the guy sitting across from me lifted his glass with a toothy smile as if to toast and greet us and said, me gusta el stylo que ustedes bailan. ¿Cuál es el nombre de ese estilo? I explained, its called West Coast Swing, and he said, me gusto mucho and lifted his glass again with a smile.

He was a Zacatecas native who was no slouch on the dance floor himself. Of most dancing, he danced almost every dance and just watching this guy at my capitulating age, he was a winner. I really liked Zacatecas and if you’re ever feeling your oats, a nice cocktail, or just young at heart, don’t miss La Mina!

(This post was edited by Oscar2 on Mar 29, 2009, 6:23 PM)


husker

Mar 30, 2009, 9:15 AM

Post #17 of 17 (10694 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Sangrita recipe

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Yes that is the one, I searched your site but didn't come up with your results. At the present I buy and use Cholula and sangrita here in Texas. That is going to change vary soon as a move is in the works.
 
 
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