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TlxcalaClaudia

Mar 6, 2009, 6:24 AM

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Handicapped going to Mexico

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I have a friend going to Mexico (state of Hidalgo). He is wheelchair bound...plans to marry a Mexican gal there. He is on disability and medicare.

Any comments....thoughts....advice...? All of you are so good at giving opinions. Since he is in a wheelchair, almost all of his friends are concerned about him moving there. I personally feel medical care in Mexico is excellent and he will be ok. I have doubts that he will get approved by IMSS though even though he will work for a school there that provides IMSS. Am I right that IMSS will not cover a handicapped foreigner? Without IMSS, I do think it is a risk and want to as gently as possible inform him of this (more than anything he wants to marry this Mexican so doesn't want to hear any negatives about going).

Aside from the IMSS ...what other "concerns" might some of you have if this were someone you knew and cared about?


Claudine



Brian

Mar 6, 2009, 6:57 AM

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Re: [TlxcalaClaudia] Handicapped going to Mexico

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Assuming he is an adult, and not under some form of conservatorship, he can make his own decisions and then live with them. If his mind is not open to discussing the disadvantages of moving to a place, why bother trying to inform him? I had to leave Mexico because of a disability which was exacerbated by problems with the physical infrastructure of many Mexican cities. The sidewalks, for example, are not maintained in a way to allow easy usage by people in wheelchairs or with other mobility problems. It can be done but it is a struggle in daily living. Love is blind. This fellow wants to marry the girl and is not being realistic. You don't mention the nature of his disability but he should know that, if he doesn't qualify for IMSS, he will not be able to get non emergency Medicare paid medical treatment while outside the United States. Hidalgo is too far from the border to make it an option to go up to the US for checkups and tests. He can obtain good treatment locally but will have to pay out of pocket.

Has he ever visited Mexico before (particularly the proposed part of Hidalgo)? If not, before making a serious commitment, he should probably do so. The Americans with Disabilities Act made public facilities more accessible for folks such as he. Mexico is far behind in providing such benefits to which he is probably now accustomed.

saludos cordiales

Brian


(This post was edited by Brian on Mar 6, 2009, 7:06 AM)


Rolly


Mar 6, 2009, 7:54 AM

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Re: [TlxcalaClaudia] Handicapped going to Mexico

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Wheelchair and México are almost mutually exclusive terms. As Brian says, sidewalks are often (usually?) wheelchair hostile. Wheelchair access to buildings is often missing. Recently, my city spent a lot of pesos adding wheelchair ramps at the curbs in the city center. Very nice, except they are all too narrow for a wheelchair.

Rolly Pirate


morgaine7


Mar 6, 2009, 8:13 AM

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Re: [Rolly] Handicapped going to Mexico

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For example:


Rolly


Mar 6, 2009, 8:23 AM

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Re: [morgaine7] Handicapped going to Mexico

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That would be funny if it were not so common.

Rolly Pirate


morgaine7


Mar 6, 2009, 9:39 AM

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Re: [Rolly] Handicapped going to Mexico

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That photo is someone else's and not from my town, but it's real.
Claudine, while I might express concerns to your friend, I wouldn't discourage him from coming (and it sounds like he's determined, anyhow). He and his fiancée must have discussed the challenges he is likely to face. You didn't mention his age or general health apart from the disability. From friends' experiences, IMSS coverage isn't a sure thing even with no major health issues. His disability payments may cover routine care, and a local private policy may be affordable if he is turned down by IMSS.

Kate


Gringal

Mar 6, 2009, 12:07 PM

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Re: [TlxcalaClaudia] Handicapped going to Mexico

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It also depends on what type of disability he is receiving. If it's the state type, then there may be location restrictions. If Federal under SS, no problem, but as others have mentioned, Medicare is only available in the states and IMSS can be picky about pre-existing conditions.

Love conquers all........but those cobblestoned streets may be a challenge, even to LOVE.


TlxcalaClaudia

Mar 6, 2009, 8:08 PM

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Re: [Gringal] Handicapped going to Mexico

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Yeh, love conquers all. They are so in love and so sure they can do this. I admire that kind of belief. Like Brian said, he is of sound mind and it really isn't my place to counsel. Life hasn't been good to him here. It does appear he has a shot at happiness in Mexico. Who wouldn't want that for an old childhood friend?
He hasn't been to Hidalgo but he has been to Cancun. This is a person who sacrificed a lot for many others even while wheelchair bound. He deserves a chance to be free and adventurous (not to mention, loved back).

Preciate the responses...I might get up the nerve to mention some of it.

Claudine


IslaZina


Mar 7, 2009, 7:41 AM

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Re: [TlxcalaClaudia] Handicapped going to Mexico

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I moved to Mexico five years ago with MS and a cane. The sidewalks are improving. Insurance in Mexico, including IMSS, excludges pre existing conditions for only two years. You are young. There always seems to be some young person to jump out in front of me when I need a hand. You may find that to be the case when facing a bad curb.
It took me a while, beins single and all, to get the folks around here comfortable with all this. Now everyone who wants to help me down steps instead of offering a limp arm, says "Tome mi hombro!" I don't see stuff like that happening in the US. Three months last year set me back a lot of money and my health didn't recover until substantial doses of vitamin D and swimming in flippers. Go for it!
http://islazina@blogspot.com


Brian

Mar 8, 2009, 5:01 PM

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Re: [IslaZina] Handicapped going to Mexico

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I am including the full text of this Mexico City News article because the link is dynamic and likely to expire:

Rights advocates say regulations are unfair to the disabled
BY NACHA CATTAN

The News

Mexico City's new traffic regulations use discriminatory language and do not consider the special conditions of the disabled, a D.F. Human Rights Commission official says.

The strict driving laws introduced on Thursday require the disabled to use pedestrian bridges, tunnels and ramps, but few are adapted for wheelchair use, said Carlos Ríos, a councilor at the commission, who relies on a wheelchair.

"I can't even use the sidewalks because they are death traps," said Ríos, who travels in the street instead. "And the ramps are either raised above the ground or have obstructions in front of them. I would happily cross a bridge if there were an elevator."

The regulations are just the latest affront by a city that has done little to make public places such as the Metro more accessible for people with disabilities, Ríos said.

But the capital's public security undersecretary, Alfredo Hernández, insisted that the city is working to improve conditions for the disabled. It has built ramps and installed Braille signs in Metrobus stations, and the new traffic regulations double the fines for drivers who block special ramps and parking spots for people with disabilities, he said.

"In the end we are trying to increase security for everyone," Hernández said. "We don't want to discriminate against anyone."

STRAPPED IN

As of Thursday, police can fine disabled passengers for riding in a vehicle without being strapped into a "restraint system." The same rule applies to children under 12.

The term "restraint system" is confusing and does not account for the diversity among the disabled, some of whom do not need any special protection, Ríos said.

"What kind of restraint system, like Hannibal Lecter?" he said.

But the most unsettling clause in the regulations define the disabled as anyone who is impeded from doing a "normal" activity, which Ríos says serves to perpetuate stereotypes of the disabled as being "abnormal."

"Using this language is without a doubt discriminatory," Ríos said.

Public security officials defended the rules, saying they are worded to imply that restraint systems should be used as needed and that only bridges and tunnels equipped with elevators are required for the disabled.

But Ríos believes the language could be much clearer.

Police said that they had gone out of their way to be more sensitive in their language when they drafted the traffic rules, working closely with activists and adopting terms such as "people with disabilities" - as opposed to still common terms like "minusválido," or "less-valid" - to prevent discrimination.

"I guess we'll have to take more notes," said Hernández, the public security official. "We should specify which types of disabilities [require special car seats]."
 
 
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