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nancyinpdx

Jan 13, 2009, 10:05 PM

Post #1 of 23 (14655 views)

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¡me encanta caldo de res!

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I just made a pot roast last night and then noticed that it tasted exactly like my fave Mexican soup, caldo de res!!! Yummy!!! Next time I'm gonna add more veggies to it instead of typical pot roast veggies!!! I used to get mad cravings for it when I lived in Tijuana last year and would frantically go around checking the neighborhood restaurants to see if they still had some at the time I wanted it.

I don't like mine with tomato or weird things like frozen mixed veggies or huge amounts of squash. How do you like yours?



Rolly


Jan 14, 2009, 7:52 AM

Post #2 of 23 (14627 views)

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Re: [nancyinpdx] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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" How do you like yours?"

Any way I can get it.

Fresh veggies are better than frozen, but sometimes you have to use what you have. I love it with lots of veggies. I especially like squash and cabbage, but I'm not too big on cauliflower. I had rather not have rice in the soup as one of my favorite cooks makes it.

Rolly Pirate


Anonimo

Jan 14, 2009, 11:22 AM

Post #3 of 23 (14611 views)

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Re: [nancyinpdx] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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I like it with garbanzos, squash, cabbage, carrots, chayote, but plenty of meat. Rice can be nice.

The more complex mole de olla, with chile guajillo and ancho seasoned broth, is a regular favorite, too.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


esperanza

Jan 14, 2009, 4:37 PM

Post #4 of 23 (14592 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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A mi también me encanta caldo de res!

Cuál de ustedes sabe que este caldo tiene otro nombre, y quién me dice cual nombre es?

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Oscar2

Jan 14, 2009, 5:03 PM

Post #5 of 23 (14585 views)

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Re: [esperanza] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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How about Caldo (or Puchero) de Res?


sergiogomez

Jan 14, 2009, 5:10 PM

Post #6 of 23 (14583 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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I'll take it any way I can get it, but it always has to have a good dose of chile, bones, and fat. I like to use ribs or shanks to give the stew lots of flavor.


Oscar2

Jan 14, 2009, 5:41 PM

Post #7 of 23 (14581 views)

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Re: [sergiogomez] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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Ribs and shanks, always gives it a nice meaty flavor and so do the bones. When freshly made, I enjoy it when the veggies still have a little consistency to them. What is another term for that, perhaps something like, al dente? Or is that purely a spaghetti thing?


esperanza

Jan 14, 2009, 7:19 PM

Post #8 of 23 (14575 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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Nope!


Next...

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Carol_Wheeler

Jan 15, 2009, 12:17 PM

Post #9 of 23 (14553 views)

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Re: [esperanza] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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¿Cocido?


esperanza

Jan 15, 2009, 12:52 PM

Post #10 of 23 (14548 views)

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Re: [Carol_Wheeler] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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Lotería! Felicidades, Carol!

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nancyinpdx

Jan 16, 2009, 1:28 AM

Post #11 of 23 (14519 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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i wanna try garbanzos and cabbage sometimes, and maybe a lil broccoli. I would precook them and put in the soup after the soup is done because i like the simple flavor of the soup with bones, lots of meat, onions, carrots, a bit of potatoes, and garlic. I put in slices of cooked corn on the cob and that is yummy. zucchini or squash is good but not too much of it either. Man, i am having Mexico withdrawals!


Anonimo

Jan 20, 2009, 6:30 AM

Post #12 of 23 (14481 views)

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Re: [nancyinpdx] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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I started working on a caldo de res yesterday; just cooking the meat in the water with a few seasonings. Then I'm refrigerating it so I can easily remove the excess fat from the top of the stock. (Leaving a little on the meat!)

Today, I'll cook the various vegs in an appropriate order. Rather than jazz it up as for a mole de olla or a churipo, I'm keeping it clean and simple, but serving it with chopped onion and cilantro, lime halves, and sliced chiles serranos.

Saludos,
Anonimo


Carron

Jan 21, 2009, 3:33 PM

Post #13 of 23 (14448 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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Restaurants here always serve it with a mound of red rice on the side. After I eat all the meat and vegetables, I dump in the rice and its like having an entirely different kind of soup for my second course.

Caldo de res is a simple soup, and simply delicious. Reminds me of the beef-vegetable soup my grandmother made when I was a child. The veggies are cut into very large pieces (carrots 2-3 inches long, thick wheels of corn, huge wedges of cabbage, a meaty marrow bone or two). Yum!!!


Anonimo

Jan 22, 2009, 4:08 AM

Post #14 of 23 (14427 views)

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Re: [Carron] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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Our caldo was sabroso. I left out the optional rice, as it was already packed with vegs and meat. I also left out the wheels of corn, because we find them annoying to deal with in the course of the soup. I did add some garbanzos.

Served with hot, crispy Pan Francés and the aforementioned condiments.

We started our meal with hot Potato-Cheese-Chile Poblano Knishes (o.k.; so it's fusion cuisine!); then the soup; then we had Pecan Pie that our guests had made.

(By the way; I used costillas de res and chamberete de res for the meat.)

Saludos,
Anonimo


nancyinpdx

Jan 27, 2009, 2:05 AM

Post #15 of 23 (14376 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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I wanna come to your house for dinner, Anonimo!!!!!!!!! That sounded fabulous! I love pecan pie and the appetizer would be yummy too. My jeans would probly be too tight after eating all that! Might as well have an agua fresca before that... my favorite is guayaba.
I've pondered opening a small cafe offering fusion cuidine. also my specialty. Like Vietnamese Mexican. Both cuisines use lots of tropical fruits and veggies, chilies, limes, fresh herbs, etc.


Anonimo

Jan 27, 2009, 1:28 PM

Post #16 of 23 (14357 views)

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Re: [nancyinpdx] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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In Reply To
I wanna come to your house for dinner, Anonimo!!!!!!!!! That sounded fabulous! I love pecan pie and the appetizer would be yummy too. My jeans would probly be too tight after eating all that! Might as well have an agua fresca before that... my favorite is guayaba.
I've pondered opening a small cafe offering fusion cuidine. also my specialty. Like Vietnamese Mexican. Both cuisines use lots of tropical fruits and veggies, chilies, limes, fresh herbs, etc.


Yes; there are some resemblances between caldo de res and pho. The spices are different and pho has those great rice noodles. It also has the tremendous assortment of fresh salad greens and herbs with which to top the pho.
(Does this provide clues that Mexico was first settled by wayfaring Vietnamese boat people? :)

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


nancyinpdx

Jan 28, 2009, 3:06 AM

Post #17 of 23 (14328 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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I love pho. Haven't made it for over 10 years! Banh tet is kind of like some of the central american tamales, I've tried. Also, i cooked pork in coconut water for my Mexican boyfriend and nem nuong (broiled or char-grilled pork meatballs on a stick) for my Oaxacan friends but served them over jasmine rice instead of bun (the same rice noodles in pho) and they loved it!!!

Don't know bout Vietnamese boat ppl in Mex!!! Heh heh! : ) But, to my surprise, there are lots of Chinese ppl in TJ who happen to speak very good Spanish!

I've read that the the tortilla was supposedly introduced to Mexico by Lebanese immigrants (or the tortilla is an adaptation of their flatbread). Some gordita wrappers I've had were rather like middle eastern bread.


Anonimo

Jan 28, 2009, 3:23 AM

Post #18 of 23 (14326 views)

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Re: [nancyinpdx] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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Quote
I've read that the the tortilla was supposedly introduced to Mexico by Lebanese immigrants (or the tortilla is an adaptation of their flatbread). Some gordita wrappers I've had were rather like middle eastern bread.


Mi querida Nancy; surely the tortilla was invented by the indigenous forebears of the Mexicans; in Mexico. Remember, maíz (corn) was unknown outside of Mesoamerica until the coming of the conquistadores.

What is more likely, that the wheat flour based flatbreads used for tacos Árabes are certainly related to pita breads from the Middle East. And tacos Árabes and tacos al pastor, descended from shawarma and doner kebabs.

Tengo hambre.

"En Boca Cerrada No Entran Moscas."

Saludos,
Anonimo


esperanza

Jan 28, 2009, 6:32 AM

Post #19 of 23 (14320 views)

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Re: [nancyinpdx] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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But, to my surprise, there are lots of Chinese ppl in TJ who happen to speak very good Spanish!

Some gordita wrappers I've had were rather like middle eastern bread.

The Chinese in Tijuana and other border towns--as well as the Chinese all over Mexico--are descendants of Chinese who came to the West during the mid-1800s to build railroads both in Mexico and the USA.

At that point in history, the USA had quotas for the number and gender of the Chinese who were allowed to enter the country. Male Chinese were allowed to enter, but no women and no children come come into the USA. To circumvent the quota stipulations, male Chinese railroad workers in the USA instructed their women, both wives and prospective wives, to come--with their children, if there were children--through Mexico into the USA.

The original Mexico/USA border checkpoints were set up to keep the Chinese, not the Mexicans, out of the USA. That's the reason so many Mexicans of Chinese descent still live along the border. Most of the Chinese who live in northern Mexico are from the Canton province of China, many opened restaurants in order to make a living, and that's why nearly all Chinese restaurants in Mexico serve only Cantonese-style food.

Gorditas, by the way, do not have 'wrappers'. The gordita is a thick corn tortilla that has ingredients either incorporated into the corn masa or is partially split with a filling stuffed into the opening once the gordita is fried. Other components--shredded cabbage or lettuce, salsa, cilantro, and crumbled cheese--top the gordita.

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Carol_Wheeler

Jan 28, 2009, 5:46 PM

Post #20 of 23 (14266 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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Yummy!

I really enjoyed this article on the influence of Lebanese immigrants on Puebla's traditional cuisine:
http://www.mexconnected.com/...s/puebla/kg0907.html

But I enjoy all of Karen Graber's articles.
: )


nancyinpdx

Jan 29, 2009, 8:13 AM

Post #21 of 23 (14238 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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I believe you, Anonimo and Esperanza. I just read earlier that the tortilla was invented by Lebanese. They maybe did invent the flour one like you suggested might be possible. It's what I was thinking was more possible/plausible when I was making my 'did you know' statement. And I know a gordita tortilla is not a 'wrapper' i just called it one cuz any tortilla can be used as a wrapper for things.

This Immigrant conversation is very interesting. i thank you both plus, David and everyone else that is teaching us about it or discussing it. I second moving the start of it and starting a new thread with it. Please, mods! Thanks y que Dios les bendiga


nancyinpdx

Jan 30, 2009, 3:28 AM

Post #22 of 23 (14212 views)

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Re: [Carol_Wheeler] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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Carol, I read that too and also enjoy her articles, which I read from time to time. I might have to make the stuffed grape leaves some day. Thanks for the link.


Jetski

Mar 28, 2009, 1:52 PM

Post #23 of 23 (13677 views)

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Re: [nancyinpdx] ¡me encanta caldo de res!

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Cocido in this sur de Sinaloa rancho is made using most of the classic ingredients; carrots, potatoes, corn on the cob and lots of caldo, however it is served as a one pot affair with only one type of meat included which is always beef and usually the short ribs, beans instead of chickpeas and no cabbage. Cocido is only eaten here at medio dia as it is considered to be a pesado meal too heavy for good digestion later in the day.
 
 
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