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leegleze


Dec 18, 2008, 11:24 AM

Post #1 of 6 (2088 views)

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Importation of Pets: official regulations

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Many of you have asked to see this, so here is a translation (as direct as I can make it) of the official regulations to import pets into the country. To see the regulations in Spanish, go to the government's page: http://148.243.71.63/default.asp?id=623

Regulations for the importation of pets into Mexico:
In agreement with the legislation and animal health standardization, in Mexico dogs and cats (mascots) are treated alike. If the mascot is smaller than three months, it requires of a Certificate of Health * If the mascot is greater than three months, it requires of a Certificate of Health* and Vaccination Card where it specifies that the vaccine against rabies was applied to him within the last 12 months. These documents must appear in original and copies.

It is very important to make sure that the documents agree with the data (age, race, color, sex, etc.) of your pet, so as not to have misfortunes in the proceedings to enter Mexico. * The Certificate of Health must appear on the printed letterhead or Professional Certificate of the Veterinary Doctor who signs it, dated no more than five days prior to entry, and must indicate the state of health of the mascot.

1.- When arriving in Mexico, you must go to the Office of Inspection of Farming Health, located within the airport or at the border, with the mascot and its documents.
2. - The mascot will be reviewed physically by Official Personnel of Farming Health of the Secretariat of Agriculture Cattle ranch, Rural Development, Fishing and Alimentación (SAGARPA) and if you come from a country with presence of aphthous fever or zones of risk, a prophylactic treatment will be applied to him, some without cost.
3. - If the mascot fulfills the requirements aforementioned, the Animal health Certificate for Import will be provided: official health document that allows the entrance of the mascot to the country.
4. - The proceeding for the import of one or two mascots is free. When there are more than 2 pets, $1,468 pesos will be due to cover the cost of the Animal health Certificate for Import.
6. You can consult the requirements of the Services of Tributary Administration (the SAT) for passengers at the following page : http://www.aduanas.sat.gob.mx/...xico/2008/index.html.

What happens if you do not have any documents when arriving int Mexico? Your mascot will have to remain in our office until a veterinary doctor reviews and certifies the state of health of the mascot and applies the anti-rabies vaccine to continue with the import proceeding. This can precipitiate misfortunes and costs that you will have to assume. What happens if it presents/displays some plague or infectious/contagious disease? Mascot will have to remain in our facilities; you have to pay for laboratory analysis and if the laboratory determines that the animal suffers a plague or exotic disease, we will have to apply some treatment. In case the animal presents a disease or plague that can cause death, their sacrifice will be done immediately. The costs that the process generates must be covered by the owner of the mascot.

What happens if you have an animal of another species like mascot for example reptiles, melodious birds, ferrets, turtles, rabbits? You will need to fulfill special requirements, established in the pages of animal health requirements, that are provided in writing in the offices of the state delegations of the Secretariat of Agriculture, Cattle ranch, Rural Development, Fishing and Feeding or in the Main directorate of Health Animal located in: Street San Lorenzo no. 1151, Ground floor Cabbage Santa Cruz Atoyac, Of. Benito Juárez CP. 03310, Mexico, DF. Schedule of opening - Monday through Friday of 09:00 to 13:00 hrs. Telephone: (55) 59051070 or (55) 59051071
~ Roxana in Bucerias ~



bournemouth

Dec 18, 2008, 11:42 AM

Post #2 of 6 (2077 views)

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Re: [leegleze] Importation of Pets: official regulations

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Thank you so much for doing this. I hope the original poster with the cats will let us know how the journey down went.


jl1

Dec 19, 2008, 5:22 PM

Post #3 of 6 (2010 views)

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Re: [bournemouth] Importation of Pets: official regulations

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All well and good....the reality is that everybody I know with small pets just passes through the airport with no questions asked. I've done it myself many times. The first time, I actually followed the Airlines' requirement of a USDA certificate. That was a logistical nightmare! After fulfilling all the requirements, I got my passport stamped, with my Yorkie on my arm, said "buenas tardes" to the official and was waived through. I will continue to do it that way until stopped.


morgaine7


Dec 19, 2008, 8:26 PM

Post #4 of 6 (1990 views)

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Re: [jl1] Importation of Pets: official regulations

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Really? Well, I've passed through with a lot of things without being stopped. When it finally happens (and it has happened), I willingly surrender excess alcohol, unlabeled medicine, lighters, or whatever inanimate object they decide is a no-no. But any pet of mine would be confiscated over my dead body, so I'd just as soon minimize the risk by adhering to the official requirements.

Kate


leegleze


Dec 20, 2008, 6:26 AM

Post #5 of 6 (1973 views)

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Re: [morgaine7] Importation of Pets: official regulations

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jl1: I totally agree with your "observations", having travelled with my Standard Poodle to and from PVR on numerous occasions without incident. But that was when I was a greenhorn, and cocky enough to think that there were no other regulations beyond the Veterinary Health Certificate that Canada & the US requires. Once I realized there were specific (and other) rules imposed by the government of Mexico itself, however, I have chosen not to risk losing my "baby" to a bureaucratic kafuffle at the airport. After all, in any country we travel to, ignorance of the law is no excuse. I suppose becoming a paralegal instructor has something to do with my eagerness to comply with such laws because I have now researched what can happen if I do not ... and it ain't pretty. Read on ...

The last time I traveled back to Mexico with my pooch, I followed the regulations to the letter after researching the most recent ones. Yes, it took me about a half-hour more to get out of the airport, and there was no hands-on inspection of the doggie, but I had the peace of mind that Simba was there legally and could not legally be removed from me. Thank goodness I did it that way because my husband and I were subsequently divorced in Mexico, and the ownership of the dog was at issue. When police came to claim the dog for my husband, I was able to prove ownership with those papers stamped by the Mexican Dept. of Agriculture, along with his CKC papers and the Vet's Certificate, all in my name. Whew! The police later told me that if the Dept. of Agriculture papers were not stamped, they would have been compelled to take the dog until the matter was sorted out. They warned me that it would have been a very long time indeed. 'Nuff said, methinks.
~ Roxana in Bucerias ~


jl1

Dec 21, 2008, 2:58 PM

Post #6 of 6 (1927 views)

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Re: [leegleze] Importation of Pets: official regulations

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I hear you, and I am very aware that things can change. The one time I did the USDA thing, the vet at the Port of San Francisco looked at me like I was nuts. I think I may have been the only person with a dog who had ever showed up. He politely explained to me that his primary function was inspecting livestock and livestock by-products, not household pets. I think your divorce situation was an unusual circumstance. I will continue to obtain recent health certificates from our Vet., but I will never to the USDA thing again. This is all good info, though. Thanks.
 
 
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