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IslaZina


Nov 13, 2008, 3:54 PM

Post #26 of 60 (3593 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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I have been here 5 years. I live in colonia la Gloria, so I don't see the day trippers much and I do wait until dusk to venture into Centro when I do go. With the economy the way it is, I hope there are a lot of day trippers this season.
There have been some nice eateries added along the shore by the docks. You should enjoy those often! And look me up...my house phone is 998 (not needed if you are using a pay phone) 888 0674. I can't remember my cel. If you run across Miguel's Moonlite, on Hidgaldo near the Palacio, he's my buddy and can call me on the cell.
In a week, I'll have my new FM2 to flash! lol
http://islazina@blogspot.com


Don Moore


Nov 13, 2008, 5:26 PM

Post #27 of 60 (3582 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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One social scientist type of guy to another, I am very curious what you make of these anecdotes thus far.
Don Moore


roni_smith


Nov 13, 2008, 5:49 PM

Post #28 of 60 (3576 views)

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Re: [IslaZina] Differences among retirees by location

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Miguel was Romi's partner at the Posada bar, wasn't he?

Word is Romi has been working with Miguel during his (Romi's) vacation recently.
------
Planning for Mexico Move Blog



roni_smith


Nov 13, 2008, 5:54 PM

Post #29 of 60 (3574 views)

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Re: [Don Moore] Differences among retirees by location

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No conclusions at this time Don.

I am not sure that there will be any conclusions, but I thought and think it had potential as a topic. I hope more people respond with their thoughts.

One potential influencing factor, I think, could be experience living in other cultures before retirement or moving to Mexico. Another that I am a bit surprised we have not heard much about yet is the ability to communicate in Spanish. I would think that might have some influence.
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Planning for Mexico Move Blog



MazDee

Nov 13, 2008, 10:29 PM

Post #30 of 60 (3539 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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Speaking Spanish Roni? That is a very important point to me, and I think the major thing that has kept me in Mazatlán. Of course I speak Spanish enough to live my daily life, and even though I now have enough confidence to make phone calls to negotiate with tradesmen, I can't carry on a meaningful conversation with a Mexican friend unless it is in English. This pains me no end! I have made wonderful friends here, both gringos and Mexicans, and that is what is keeping me here, but I am not particularly liking what is happening to this place. The old laid-back Maz that I moved to is being supplanted with something else. I want to move to another city in México but am afraid of being isolated because of my language problem. I keep telling myself, poco a poco I will get there. Meanwhile, here I am in a different city than the one I moved to 6 years ago. To answer your initial question, I think there were many like-minded gringos in this city when I moved here. Now, many people are moving in, with different reasons, and most of it seems to start with "where can I get the most with my retirement income" not "will I like living in México." And many of them don't have a clue when they buy their house or condo here. Gotta work on my language problem, for sure. Dee


IslaZina


Nov 14, 2008, 12:32 AM

Post #31 of 60 (3529 views)

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Re: [MazDee] Differences among retirees by location

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Spanish is vital! If you don't speak Spanish, consider not moving to Mexico. Bad things happen to Americans who don't learn the language. Contractors take advantage of you, wrong items arrive at your house, the pizza order is screwed up, etc etc. Miguel, the bartender I mentioned, did me a favor and refused to speak to me in English for 2 years. I hadn't noticed until one day he did. And then he told me he did that because he immediately saw I was being taken advantage of, being charged the gringo rate by contractors and that it had to stop.
Now I don't use contractors. I contract my own workers at the local rate. I have friends I socialize with, attend baptism and birthday parties for their kids, sit with real folks and eat salchicha salads! Ha! I did meet one I liked at the last baptism in Ticul, south of Merida. But I digress.
Language also enables you to have friends of all social statuses, not just befriending the people you hire, who would tolerate anything and hope you would teach them some English for their service jobs. Also work a little in, but...I also have friends among the professionals and merchants I don't patronize. Signaling, I guess, that I'm not just another cash cow. My life now, with the language, is what I had hoped for when I moved here. Without it, I would be sipping overpriced beverages in Centro with people I wouldn't necessarily cross the street to have a drink with in the States. There is a large expat community here for the size of the municipality, and they cling together, gossip about each other, puzzle over getting folks hired, and act as if they were in the US. I don't get it. Why move to Mexico if you aren't going to hang out with Mexicans? And if you move to Mexico without it, come with a lot of money. You will need it.
http://islazina@blogspot.com

(This post was edited by IslaZina on Nov 14, 2008, 4:26 AM)


Georgia


Nov 14, 2008, 7:32 AM

Post #32 of 60 (3503 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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My husband and I live on the west end of Lake Chaala, near the town of Jocotepec, in the colony of el Chante. Almost eight years ago we came to Tlaquepaque (a favorite place of my childhood) for a visit, decided to look around out of curiosity, not knowing of the large gringo population in Ajijic. We asked a realtor to show us some houses so, in the event we ever retired, we would know what was available here. The altitude, climate, and society agree with me. She balked at showing us the house we bought. She said it was "too far out" (from what? upstate NY? Everything was. Remember: I knew nothing about Ajijic.) The she nformed us it was in a Mexican village. (Wow. Who'da thunk it?) Frustrated, she said said we'd have to speak Spansh to survive here. (Bilingual all my life, not an issue.) So she showed us the house. Rural. Chickens. Pigs. Most importantly a resident cartaker. Nice chunk of land overlooking pleasant fields. (Salesperson said it was "lakefront" but we could find any lake. Didn't care.) Came back two weeks later, signed the contract, retired early and moved down, lock, stock, barrell and golden retriever. Never looked back.

This is not the "approved" way of doing things, I know. But we lived in the country before and did not want a bustling town life 24/7. I prefer Mexian society in general (likewise Ecuadorean and Spanish) where, if you want to socialize, you just walk out your front door or now, down to the Malecon. We are not joiners. So, the presence of many nob type organizations was not a draw for US. This place suited us, and I know it is not for everybody. We also have a small apartment in Tlaquepaque because on occasion we like to partake of the cultural events that Guadalajara has to offer without a long night time drive back and we have many friends up there.

Ajijic is a smooth transition more or less for foreigners who don't want to be totally out of their element. There is even a Wal Mart there now. Jocotepec is much less so. I'm not sure about Chapala, although it is closer to the airport, has nice sidewalks, a nice waterfront, and is the municipal seat (as is Jocotepec). I know there are some organizations geared to foreigners in Chapala, as well. To the best of my knowledge there are none in Jocotepec.

So, that, as I see it, is the story on differences on the north shore of Lake Chapala.


tonyburton / Moderator


Nov 14, 2008, 7:34 AM

Post #33 of 60 (3503 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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Your question has been at least partially asked, and answered, in an academic context by Dr. David Truly, one of our very own Mexconnectors. David Truly's work is very interesting, and one of only a handful of academic studies on the subject of American and Canadian retirees in Mexico. Sadly, we have not yet gained permission (from his publishers) to host his articles on this site, so you'd need to either approach him direct:
Dr. David Truly
Department of Geography/Tourism and Hospitality Studies
Central Connecticut State University
trulyd@ccsu.edu

or read the newspaper accounts of his research, via google, or look for his academic publications on the topic via an academic library access system.

While his work is based largely on the Chapala area (where he is investigating how the profiles of incoming American and Canadian residents have changed over time), the same principles would almost certainly apply to the flows of foreign residents at any one point in time to different locations. Hence, you would expect a significant difference in the profiles of people attracted to, for example, Puerto Vallarta, in compariison with, say, Alamos.

Hope this helps, Tony.


esperanza

Nov 14, 2008, 9:24 AM

Post #34 of 60 (3477 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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Roni, that is an extremely complicated question to which I can only offer my observations. My observations aren't the only truth; they're just true from my point of view.


Where a person decides to live in Mexico can depend on a wide range of factors, as we've already seen on this thread. I recently heard someone say, "You live here either because you fall in love with Mexico, or because you fall in love with someone who loves Mexico." I've also heard, "Foreigners who come to live in Mexico are either wanted...or unwanted." And we've all heard, "Mexico is not for everyone."


Many people go through definite stages in living here. Some fall in love with one area and stay there forever, others decide to move away from the spot they initially found attractive, and still others decide that Mexico was not for them and go back to their country of origin.


Many, many Canadian and American retirees come to Mexico for a couple of reasons: the weather and the financial advantage of living where their dollars go farther. People who are tired of winter search for year-round weather more to their liking. People tired of squeaking by each month on limited Social Security like the idea that they have more purchasing power, whether for real estate or groceries, than they had in their countries of origin.
In the past—say 30 years ago, when I arrived—many foreigners moved to Mexico for the grand adventure of it. In those days, Mexico was truly a third-world country. There was no so-called globalization. Many things that were taken for granted at that time in the USA and Canada did not exist in Mexico. There were no superhighways, only the libre. Many homes had no electricity, no refrigeration, and no propane for cooking. In-home telephone service was almost non-existent in rural Mexico. A washing machine was a rarity. Television wasn’t available just anywhere and cable service was unknown. There were few imported products in stores. Life in Mexico was substantially different from life here today.



Some of us old-timers miss that way of life; others rejoice in the arrival of McDonalds, the Internet, and shopping at Wal-Mart. Some still stick to the libre, others only travel the cuota. Most of us who are old Mexico hands find our way between the old ways and the new. For example, I’m glad we have the Internet, but I miss the casual use of telegrams for interpersonal communication.
In Ajijic and San Miguel de Allende, English-speaking expatriates find large English-speaking support groups to ease their transition into Mexico. Some folks never make that transition, preferring to stay within English-speaking enclaves for their social life, entertainment, and the different interest groups available to expats. It’s easier to be in Mexico when one can convince oneself that it’s just like Peoria, only warmer and more colorful. Others take Spanish language acquisition seriously, practice its use diligently, and branch out into the larger community where conversational Spanish is necessary.


By and large, I think that Guadalajara does not attract very many retired expatriates. My experience was that the majority of expats living in Guadalajara was working for either Mexican or foreign businesses, was teaching English or another subject for which they were uniquely qualified, or had their own businesses. It's difficult to live in Guadalajara without at least conversational-level Spanish. There is very little English-speaking community and few English-language events--even at the American Society-- although there are many foreigners living in the city.


In Morelia, the English-speaking community is very small. For the most part, a walk around the Centro Histórico yields the sight of just a few non-Mexicans, most of them toting guidebooks and cameras—obviously not locals. Many English-speaking foreigners don’t like Morelia’s weather: it’s too cold in the winter.


I do think that there are some expatriates who start their Mexico experiences in one of the ease-in locations like Ajijic or San Miguel de Allende and then ‘graduate’ if their needs change to require less English-speaking resources. However, as I mentioned earlier, many are content to find comfort in the places where they started their Mexican lives. There’s no one way to live in Mexico!


http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Oscar2

Nov 14, 2008, 10:15 AM

Post #35 of 60 (3465 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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One potential influencing factor, I think, could be experience living in other cultures before retirement or moving to Mexico.



Funny you should ask, because for the first time last June we spent a delightful one-month vacation in Bali, Indonesia. Most tourists would collectively comment on how really inexpensive living is while traveling certain parts of Asia compared to some north continents, and Europe where the Euro is so expensive and now rules.

Some of the impoverished Balinese landowners, who had inherited ancestral land, are in such dire straits that while a professor emeritus from Virginia and us were having a Martini, he talked to us about the Villa he had built the year before. He revealed he was writing a book about it, and while he talked, these two Balinese, very young men tended to his every need. Aside from chauffeuring him, they anxiously lit his cigarettes, brought him his food, drinks, made phone calls and/or whatever he deemed necessary with the lifting of a brow or a quirk in his smile which were signals recognized and were accustomed too. I still think about this from time to time, and not being accustomed to this, we just witnessed, and as they say – as in Rome…. It was, a bit fascinating but we just looked on and smiled…

He went on to say that the object behind these very old ancestral property hand-me-downs was that the land was going nowhere and just sitting there for heavens knows how long, so the professor (jack), who became friends with the landowner, made a deal with him. The landowner and Jack drew up a trust for a large parcel of land, to build his home and to do with it as he pleased for as long as he lived, providing that whatever he built on the land would become the landowner’s property, at the professor’s demise. This is the nutshell version but I'm sure there is more, for this, Jacks book may hit a best seller one day..

Jack built himself a very nice Villa, plus several other rentals to defray costs and he hired the landowner’s son to manage the estate and rentals while he was abroad, home in the states and/or elsewhere several months out of the year. Labor is .25 cents an hour. The services one gets is contingent on how well you compensate and starting at .25 cents an hour, services are exceptional, why, because they treat you with kindness and patients while hoping their smiles and pleasantries will tender a small token of your appreciation.

I’d love to talk more about this but as just one of the cronies who mills around MC’s lobbies, listening sharing antidotes, exchanging small conversation, too grave issues of state and travel logs, I must restrain myself from not going to far afield from being locked for not staying in Mexico’s queue.

Perhaps another time another day when our harnesses are exchanged with bits that don’t pull so hard on the gums…….. Yes, I know, there are other venues… Laugh

I can go on about how cheap it is to live in other cultures and countries similar to Bali; just from the feedback, I received from other international tourists. But I’ll come to a close on the subject by sharing that the sign of the times and economy is now making a shift toward some of the lesser inexpensive Asian and Indonesian countries and international tourism there was surprisingly brisk.


JohnnyBoy

Nov 14, 2008, 10:19 AM

Post #36 of 60 (3463 views)

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Re: [MazDee] Differences among retirees by location

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I can't carry on a meaningful conversation with a Mexican friend unless it is in English. This pains me no end!


Dee,

I sympathize with you and understand completely what you mean. I imagine many other MexConnectors do as well. I have tried to learn three foreign languages now. With all three I was able to live for extended periods of time, years, in countries where the languages are spoken: Italy, Germany, Switzerland, and now Mexico. I am an ABD (All-But-Dissertation) in German, meaning that I completed the course work for a PhD but did not get the degree because I did not write a dissertation. I lived in Germany and German-speaking Switzerland for two or three years, off and on, over time. I lived in Italy for five years. Now in Mexico going on two years. In every instance I worked hard on learning the language and in every instance my primary and most significant impediment was too much socializing with people who spoke English. There is no German who ever took a basic course of beginners English who is not completely convinced that his English is better than my German. Italians can't imagine why in the world you want to speak Italian when English is available to you. Most of the Italians I know are far more comfortable speaking their regional dialect and for them speaking standard Italian takes them back to the classroom and they find it boring. So it was not only a struggle to avoid other native speakers of English, but also like pulling teeth to get a German to speak German or an Italian to speak Italian, if they could speak any English at all.

After all that, I never reached a level of competence in German or Italian that would let me hold an in depth casual conversation with a native speaker on whatever topic might randomly occur. Why? Well, my German is bookish, scholastic. My Italian is juvenile, because I learned it in my late teens and early twenties. I lack appropriate general vocabulary. It takes years of living in a linguistic culture to pick up enough vocabulary to meet your needs for such conversations.

I too thought I would pick up Spanish relatively easily, because I consider it to be a close cousin to Italian. But Italian has always gotten in the way of my Spanish, and now I find I cannot speak Italian as well as before, because I never get a chance to use it and when I do, here in Mexico, I feel so "surrounded" by Spanish that Spanish words I am very familiar with start slipping in when I don't know the word in Italian. Who would ever have imagined I would know the words for: fan, handyman, mopboard, lawn, drainage, water softener, etc. in Spanish but not in German or Italian? Well, it all has to do with the fact that I bought a new house in Mexico and had to make it liveable, where I never did anything like that in Italy or Switzerland. Would that I could...have a house in Italy or Switzerland, that is. Conversely I know absolutely nothing about Mexican literature and have not travelled much in Mexico. I know German literature better than most Germans and I have seen more of Italy than most Italians.

My partner's English is OK. He does not care to improve it. He resists and ignores any corrections I make, so I don't make them anymore. But it is WORK...trying to figure out what he is trying to say sometimes, and I almost always understand what he is saying if he says it in Spanish, but I usually cannot reply in Spanish if it involves in-depth grammatical expertise, especially certain verb conjugations. I once thought I really had the hang of the Spanish subjunctive, and said so in a MexConnect posting, but I have since come to realize that I have not scratched the surface of the Spanish subjunctive. And isn't it odd, what does it tell me, that my partner continues to speak bad English to me and makes me do all sorts of tiring mental gymnastics to figure out what he is trying to say, when he could say it in Spanish in the first place and I would probably understand, and I would learn and make progress in Spanish? Why is it easier for him to speak bad English to me instead of good Spanish?

I have resigned myself to never being able to speak Spanish, or any foreign language, as well as I, and apparently you, and probably many others, wish we could. I am more convinced than ever that bilingualism (or polylingualism) is something that has to be started and accomplished in our youth. The earlier the better. There are many out there who will claim fluency, but that word, fluency, is very much open to interpretation and definition. According to my own definition of fluency, I have never met someone who spoke a foreign language (not his/her mother tongue) fluently who did not learn it in his/her youth.

So my advice to you, which I have taken to heart myself, is to forget ever being fluent in Spanish to the extent that you can hold an in-depth conversation about any randomly occurring subject with a native speaker of Spanish. Let it suffice that you can figure out what the topic is and hold your own, maybe not eloquently, for a couple of minutes. Congratulate yourself that you at least are making an effort to do as much as you can with Spanish. Apparently we are in a tiny minority as most senior expat gringos do not even make an attempt.

I have begun to resign myself to the idea that I am going to be alone here in Mexico when it comes to carry on meaningful conversations with another person. I have not encountered one single expat gringo here. Not one. Hard to imagine that in a city of close to 1 million I am the only one here. I will have to get all my yakking done on my occasional trips NoB to visit friends and family there, and hope that I get invited back even though I have talked the hind leg off of them.


IslaZina


Nov 14, 2008, 12:02 PM

Post #37 of 60 (3442 views)

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Re: [JohnBleazard] Differences among retirees by location

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Try resigning yourself to my method: Poverty of thought. Think in Spanish, forcing yourself to only use the vocabulary you have. Keep a dictionary at hand, so when you are thinking your thoughts, you can complete them. For example: Tome una bolsa por mi palabras. Utilizar qual yo tiene. Tome un sarten, hace huevo frito. Ya, y otra! Alguno tocino. Comer. Tome su tendedor, abre su boca...
However many words you have won't seem enough. Do no allow yourself to think in English.
Go to the dictionary, find the ones you are missing. Then sientate, descansa...and so on. No public spectacle, but slow progress. Reading the newspaper helps a lot. Do it like we were taught as kids - skip the words you don't know and then ask yourself what, in context, would be the word. Have the dictionary beside you. Etc etc etc.
http://islazina@blogspot.com


raferguson


Nov 14, 2008, 12:06 PM

Post #38 of 60 (3441 views)

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Re: [MazDee] Differences among retirees by location - language

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Don't get discouraged about learning a language. It takes time and effort. I suggest a tutor, one hour at a time, once or twice a week. You can learn to speak; that is not to say that anyone will confuse you with a native speaker, but that you can get comfortable and relaxed about using the language.

I have reached the point where I can have fairly complex discussions in Spanish. I think that it took me four or five years to get to the casual social conversation level. Yes, I still make errors; if I wanted to improve I would hire a tutor, but I speak well enough for my purposes.

Certainly if you hang out with English Speakers you will not learn Spanish very quickly, if at all. The best approach would be to move somewhere where no one speaks English. If the people around you speak both languages, then if your Spanish is not that great, they will speak English, just for convenience. If they don't speak English, you will both be forced to speak Spanish, which is what you need. I think that it would be difficult to learn Spanish in San Miguel de Allende or Mazatlan, and much easier to learn it in Catemaco Veracruz or San Cristobal de las Casas. But it also has to do with who you decide to hang out with. If you spend your time with the only other person in town who speaks English, that is not going to help you.

When I travel, I am usually the best Spanish speaker, so any and all business tends to fall to me. My last Spanish immersion was when I was walking alone across Spain. There were few English Speakers, and I preferred to hang out with Spaniards. I walked with them, talked with them, had dinner with them, drank beer with them, argued politics, you name it. I spoke very little English during that three week period, partly by choice and partly because of the situation. A great experience, and it clearly improved my Spanish.

Don't give up, get a tutor, and keep working at it.

Richard


http://www.fergusonsculpture.com


sioux4noff

Nov 14, 2008, 12:30 PM

Post #39 of 60 (3435 views)

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Re: [JohnBleazard] Differences among retirees by location

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Interesting post, John. I am at the point where I can almost always get my point across in normal situations. I have a few Mexican friends who don't speak English and our conversations are limited. But I keep trying and they are pretty helpful.
I have a good friend (Mexican) who speaks English well. I try to speak to him in Spanish as much as possible, but there are (many) times I have to resort to English when having a more in-depth conversation. He does the same, resorts to Spanish, when he can't think of what he needs to say in English. We have had some interesting conversations with me speaking English to him and him speaking Spanish to me. It must sound very strange to anyon nearby but it works.
In the few years we've been friends, both of our foreign language skils have improved a lot.


roni_smith


Nov 14, 2008, 1:22 PM

Post #40 of 60 (3418 views)

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Re: [IslaZina] Differences among retirees by location

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That is an interesting method Islazina. I practice thinking in Spanish. Portuguese sneaks in, but I'd rather that than English. Now when I speak Portuguese, Spanish sneaks in as well. :)

I am nowhere near fluent, but I am not afraid to be around people who do not speak English, as we were in Guanajuato and Tonala. It was not all smooth as silk, but we did get along all right. When we were at the Commercial Mexicana in Guanajuato, Kathy wanted a fingernail file. Didn't have a clue, but I did say "Mi esposa necisita alguna cosa para los dedos que hace asi y asi" at when point I play acted using a fingernail file. They told me the word and we got one just fine and we all seemed to enjoy it. I have been blessed, I guess, by running across many Mexicans who were more than happy to help my vocabulary along

Which brings up a question, a little off-topic. Is a partially blind woman: medio ciega, media ciega, medio ciego or what?

thanks

Ron
------
Planning for Mexico Move Blog



esperanza

Nov 14, 2008, 2:07 PM

Post #41 of 60 (3409 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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A woman who is blind in one eye is tuerta.


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roni_smith


Nov 14, 2008, 2:28 PM

Post #42 of 60 (3400 views)

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Re: [esperanza] Differences among retirees by location

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She has limited visual field in both eyes so, no es tuerta.
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Planning for Mexico Move Blog



morgaine7


Nov 14, 2008, 3:37 PM

Post #43 of 60 (3380 views)

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One potential influencing factor, I think, could be experience living in other cultures before retirement or moving to Mexico. Another that I am a bit surprised we have not heard much about yet is the ability to communicate in Spanish. I would think that might have some influence.

Before retiring in México, I'd spent nearly three decades as a working expat, mostly in developing countries, including 25 years in Cairo. There's no doubt that the experience greatly influenced my expectations and adjustment. It didn't even occur to me to worry that life here might be difficult. Still, it's hard to imagine being my age (61) and relocating abroad for the very first time as I did at 28.

I arrived in La Paz 18 months ago without Spanish, but with the assumption that I was going to learn it, and I am. Foreigners are scarce in my neighborhood, and the few I've met are part-timers. One Mexican neighbor (a doctor) knows a little English, the others none at all. While I've made a handful of English-speaking friends, I don't see them frequently, so 95% of my life is in Spanish. It's my fourth language, and I'm not by any means fluent. I still understand much better than I speak or write and tend to insert Arabic or French if I'm missing a word. But gradually I'm becoming able to participate in more complex exchanges. Recent situations have involved discussing property inheritance laws, buying a pressure pump on Mercado Libre, learning how one goes about making a will, and commiserating with a neighbor whose boyfriend briefly walked out on her (beer helps). I doubt I'd be this far along if I lived mainly among foreigners and English-speaking Mexicans.

Kate


azheat


Nov 14, 2008, 5:02 PM

Post #44 of 60 (3357 views)

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Which brings up a question, a little off-topic. Is a partially blind woman: medio ciega, media ciega, medio ciego or what?


Yes, I'd like to know this as well, for my legally blind husband,
who also happens to be a "Ron".

He also uses a guide dog, which should be interesting. We actually
discovered there is a law in Mexico allowing service animals access,
so we're thinking we'd like to get that printed out in Spanish AND
English to carry with us.

Cheers,
Tina


roni_smith


Nov 14, 2008, 7:29 PM

Post #45 of 60 (3328 views)

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Re: [azheat] Differences among retirees by location

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When Kathy and I visited the Lake Chapala area in 2006, we saw a couple walking down the sidewalk, both with red and white canes.

Kathy allowed as how she would like a place with smoother streets. San Miguel's cobblestone streets were far more regular and smooth than those in Ajijic
------
Planning for Mexico Move Blog



azheat


Nov 14, 2008, 8:34 PM

Post #46 of 60 (3316 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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That's reassuring! It's kind of interesting, because Ron has
actually made contact with several visually impaired people
in SMA. Seems to be quite a few.

We'll be there starting in December. If the two of you make it
that way again, perhaps we could meet?

Best,
Tina


Oscar2

Nov 14, 2008, 9:07 PM

Post #47 of 60 (3311 views)

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Re: [azheat] Differences among retirees by location

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When consideration is needed, it doesn’t hurt at all to look at the one this is addressed too and with a smile just say:

Perdone, pero mi esposa es poca ciega. - Excuse me, but my wife is a bit blind.
or
Perdone, pero mi esposo es poco ciego. – Excuse me, but my husband is bit blind.


azheat


Nov 15, 2008, 5:44 AM

Post #48 of 60 (3286 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] Differences among retirees by location

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Thanks Oscar. From time to time, he and I can always
replace ciego and ciega with loco or loca! Gotta love
the flexibility of this.

Hey, I'm learning Spanish! Yay!

Cheers,
Tina


Don Moore


Nov 15, 2008, 6:52 PM

Post #49 of 60 (3214 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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I am pretty certain that both those factors are big ones in decisions on where to live and how people live wherever they live.
Don Moore


Don


Nov 15, 2008, 8:14 PM

Post #50 of 60 (3193 views)

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Re: [roni_smith] Differences among retirees by location

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Below is the reason why the wife and I picked the area we chose for retirement.

The wife and I chose the state of Jalisco to retire as she was born in that state and has many relatives living there.We really liked the town of Colima, Colima, but ruled that out due to the weather. We started going down on vacations every year, starting in the late 1960's. We traveled to many states on those vacations and I too prefered the state of Jalisco, so we began looking for areas in which to retire.

The wife was born in San Gabriel, Jalisco, but we ruled out that town as we thought it to be too remote. We checked out the towns around Lake Chapala, but didn't care for the area and thought it was like living in the U.S. The costal area is too hot and humid. We bought a lot in Guadalajara, but really didn't care for all the traffic in the area. We sold the lot and ended up choosing Sayula, Jalisco. It is close to her family and is a town of about 35,000. The town is clean and the people are great. Many retirees living there, but most all are Mexicans. The town is located 1 hr north of Colima, Colima and 1 hr south of Guadalajara. We are about 2 1/2 hours from the ocean and just a short drive from the mountain resort of Tapalpa.The Guadalajara airport is about a 1 1/2 hours drive.

The weather is fantastic. Due to where the town sits, a lot of the rain passes us by and we get a cooling breeze most evenings on hot days. We don't need heaters in the winter, except maybe two nights a year while watching T.V., or do we need air conditioning. Fans do the job when needed. About 30 minutes from our town is Ciudad Guzman with a population of over 100,000. What we can't find in our town, we can usually locate it in Guzman, which has most all major car dealerships and shopping. Another major point is we don't need the night life one finds in bigger cities or need a lot of "gringo" population to mingle with. We are also close to good medical care which is important to us. We are kept very busy and entertained with our mostly Mexican friends and the wife's many family members. I might also add, MY Spanish is very limited.


(This post was edited by Don on Nov 15, 2008, 8:34 PM)
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