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raferguson


Sep 4, 2008, 8:51 PM

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Sabroso vs. Rico - tocayo - Mucho gusto

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I was at my local Spanish conversation group, and we were discussing hamburgesas. The question came up, if sabrosa or rica was a better word to describe a tasty burger. I was inclined to think that rica might not be the best word, but I may have been confusing the usage of "rica" with the usage of "rich" in English. Is there any difference between sabrosa or rica in definition or in usage?

Picked up a new word today, tocayo. I met another Richard and he said that I was his tocayo, or namesake. I assume that he was using the word correctly, even though obviously one of us was not named for the other person.

At the end, I shook the hand of someone who I had just met an hour earlier, and said "mucho gusto", and then wondered if "mucho gusto" was as appropriate in saying goodbye as when you first met the person. Again, in English we would say "nice to meet you" at the beginning of the conversation and at the end.

Miscellaneous questions, but I am sure that I will get some opinions and answers.

Buen dia.

Richard


http://www.fergusonsculpture.com



esperanza

Sep 4, 2008, 9:52 PM

Post #2 of 6 (6852 views)

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Re: [raferguson] Sabroso vs. Rico - tocayo - Mucho gusto

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I was at my local Spanish conversation group, and we were discussing hamburgesas. The question came up, if sabrosa or rica was a better word to describe a tasty burger. I was inclined to think that rica might not be the best word, but I may have been confusing the usage of "rica" with the usage of "rich" in English. Is there any difference between sabrosa or rica in definition or in usage?

Those would be hamburguesas, Richard. Eithe sabrosas or ricas works--rico(a), in the instance of talking about food, means 'delicious'. The usage has been around for at least 30 years if not longer. Rico(a) is always used with the verb estar. Las hamburguesas en ese restaurante están ricas. El desayuno que preparó ella estuvo muy rico.

Picked up a new word today, tocayo. I met another Richard and he said that I was his tocayo, or namesake. I assume that he was using the word correctly, even though obviously one of us was not named for the other person.

Tocayo(a) is used for namesake in the sense of someone who shares your name. Cristina Aguilera es mi tocaya. El tocayo de Richard tiene un restaurante en Morelia en donde se venden hamburguesas muy ricas.

At the end, I shook the hand of someone who I had just met an hour earlier, and said "mucho gusto", and then wondered if "mucho gusto" was as appropriate in saying goodbye as when you first met the person. Again, in English we would say "nice to meet you" at the beginning of the conversation and at the end.

Mucho gusto is just the right thing to have said.

Miscellaneous questions, but I am sure that I will get some opinions and answers.

Buen dia.

Richard


http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









(This post was edited by esperanza on Sep 4, 2008, 9:54 PM)


sergiogomez / Moderator

Sep 4, 2008, 11:50 PM

Post #3 of 6 (6844 views)

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Re: [raferguson] Sabroso vs. Rico - tocayo - Mucho gusto

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Sabroso and rico are both used to mean "delicious" or "tasty." I would tend to say that rico is for everyday usage while you might use sabroso to refer to something especially tasty. If you want to be more emphatic, use riquísimo or sabrosísimo.

Tocayo, tocaya--someone who shares your first name.

And mucho gusto is used both at the beginning and at the end of conversations, just like in English. When you're meeting someone for the first time, "mucho gusto en conocerlo/la" are often the last or nearly the last words spoken to the person. Mucho gusto for short. Just like saying, "Well, nice to meet you" in English.


sioux4noff

Sep 5, 2008, 12:54 PM

Post #4 of 6 (6816 views)

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Re: [sergiogomez] Sabroso vs. Rico - tocayo - Mucho gusto

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<<Tocayo, tocaya--someone who shares your first name. >>

In Texas, an Argentine co-worker used that term for someone who shared his last name. Is that correct usage in Mexico?


Oscar2

Sep 5, 2008, 1:56 PM

Post #5 of 6 (6810 views)

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Re: [raferguson] Sabroso vs. Rico - tocayo - Mucho gusto

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Pending circumstances, like if it’s someone you’ll enjoy seeing again and/or wish to be remembered in a little better state of friendship, I have and one can use the following with eye contact and a nice smile which delivers a vote of confidence..

Por cierto, con mucho gusto.
or
Siempre, con mucho gusto.


sergiogomez / Moderator

Sep 6, 2008, 10:49 AM

Post #6 of 6 (6775 views)

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Re: [sioux4noff] Sabroso vs. Rico - tocayo - Mucho gusto

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Sí. Tocayo, tocayo de apellido.
 
 
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