Mexico Connect
Forums  > General > Living, Working, Retiring
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All


RogerTX

Apr 18, 2008, 10:12 AM

Post #1 of 46 (4191 views)

Shortcut

Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
I know there are many retired people on this site who are now living in Mexico. I respect your insight and would really like to get your thoughts on something.

If you were 45 yrs old, only had 20 or 30k in the bank, were fluent in Spanish, and loved Mexican culture, would you pull up your roots and move to Mexico? If yes, where would you focus your attention? You have excellent language and people skills... What would you consider doing to make a living there?



Rolly


Apr 18, 2008, 10:47 AM

Post #2 of 46 (4177 views)

Shortcut

Re: [RogerTX] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Buy an SUV/van, move to a tourist area , and set up shop as a private tour guide.

Rolly Pirate


esperanza

Apr 18, 2008, 11:22 AM

Post #3 of 46 (4166 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Rolly] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
It's not often that I disagree with Rolly, but in this case I'd be really careful about following his advice.

Mexico takes its tourist guides very seriously and requires that they pass extensive classroom coursework and licensing procedure. Working as a tourist guide without having passed the courses and exams could put you in danger of deportation. Even with an FM-3 and a regular work permit, you'd be looking over your shoulder constantly to make sure that your area's licensed guides weren't reporting you to the authorities.

No matter what work you find to do in Mexico, you need to be aware that salaries here are vastly different from those in the USA. Be sure that you can live on substantially less than in the States. You'll also want to know that during the course of 2008, retail prices on most goods you'll need to survive (from vegetables and fruits to milk and eggs) have risen in the neighborhood of 30 to 50%. Life here is not as inexpensive as it once was.

And are you already aware of the money requirements for foreigners to live year-round in Mexico? Go to Rolly's website to investigate. Currently, you're required to have a monthly income of approximately $1500 USD in order to qualify for an FM-3 visa. That's the one you'd need in order to live here legally as a year-round resident.

Given that there are many, many cultures in Mexico, I'd be interested to hear which you love!

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









cristalhombre


Apr 18, 2008, 11:26 AM

Post #4 of 46 (4161 views)

Shortcut

Re: [RogerTX] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Roger

Based on your list I would say YES in about 3 seconds (which is about 2 seconds too long).

I'm 52, not retired, and probably never will be (just my nature) - I am self employed and see the world with an entrepreneurial lens. Mexico offers so many opportunities, IMHO. Having stated your skills and assets there would be NO stopping me from that move. What I can not address here are the laws and limitations you might encounter as an "income earner" in MX. Others have more experience on that subject.

All I want to suggest to you is that I see "limitless opportunities" for working and living in MX.

If I was single and not parenting a teenager.......... I would be down there at least 6 months each year.

good luck and keep MexConnect posted with your decisioning!





"NOT ALL WHO WANDER ARE LOST...."


Rolly


Apr 18, 2008, 12:30 PM

Post #5 of 46 (4145 views)

Shortcut

Re: [esperanza] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Hum...Learn something new every day. That surprises me.

I guess it hasn't always been that way. Back in the 1930s and '40s my grandmother lived in México City most of the time. She worked as a private tour guide off and on. She was around 60 and refused to take any tourist over 45. She used to say the "old" ones couldn't keep up with her.

Rolly Pirate


RogerTX

Apr 18, 2008, 12:38 PM

Post #6 of 46 (4135 views)

Shortcut

Re: [cristalhombre] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Rolly and Cristal, I like the way you guys think! And I forgot to mention that there are no children in the equation. Esperanza, thank you for your comments. However, it made me think how we Americans tend to play by the rules and even moreso, play it safe. I sometimes wonder if that slows us down a little. I know it affects me that way. And to think... rather than being on a forum asking people for encouragement, I could already be living in Mexico!

Did I mention that along with the other criteria, I spent a year living in Mexico City as an exchange student? It was back in the 90s and times have definitely changed since then. Regardless, I continue to go to Mexico every chance I get. Esperanza, you asked me what it was about the culture that I enjoy so much? I really love the language and the people in Mexico and their relaxed attitude about life. Also enjoy the food, scenery, trips to Pueblitos, beaches, museums, etc.. But what I really love about Mexico is the women. Not just that I find them incredibly attractive but the way they look at life, relationships, marriage, families. My ex-wife is a Chilanga (from Mexico City) and even despite being divorced, we continue to be the best of friends. That's another thing... family unity in Mexico. Reminds me of what I imagine it used to be like in the USA back in the 50's. It's sure not that way today.

I wonder how the immigration scenario is affected if a foreigner were to marry a Mexican citizen. Any ideas out there?

Again, thanks for your input. Please keep it coming! I'm nearly finished rehabbing my townhome and once it's done, I'll decide whether to lease or sell, and I'm ready to make a move!


esperanza

Apr 18, 2008, 12:46 PM

Post #7 of 46 (4133 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Rolly] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Rolly, take a look at this:

http://www.sectur.gob.mx/...padron_de_guias_de_t.

Things have really changed since the '30s and '40s!

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









jerezano

Apr 18, 2008, 12:46 PM

Post #8 of 46 (4130 views)

Shortcut

Re: [RogerTX] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Hello,

As an 82 year-old adopted Mexican with 20 years under my belt, I would say ABSOLUTELY NOT. The primary requirement you need to be working on is a stable retirement income. No matter where you want to live, unless you have an adequate forseeable income for the next 50 years (you are 45) which will cover your living needs and medical emergencies--which will undoubtedly come--this idea of a move to Mexico is not a good one. At your age for example, the question is: Why do you have ONLY 20k or 30k in the bank? If you can answer truthfully that it is because you have a flourishing retirement fund set up which will keep increasing and fund your retirement years, then by all means come to Mexico and take your chances. Without that security, forgedaboudit.

Best of luck. You need it. jerezano.


esperanza

Apr 18, 2008, 12:54 PM

Post #9 of 46 (4127 views)

Shortcut

Re: [RogerTX] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Roger, I've lived either part or full time in Mexico for nearly 30 years and am a Mexican citizen. I don't necessarily believe in playing it safe, but I do believe in playing it smart.

I guess if you really long to live here, you don't want to risk being deported and losing your dream. I've seen it happen, and it's not a good scenario.

As to immigration, even if you're married to a Mexican citizen you still need the FM-3 to live here legally for more than 180 days. You can become a Mexican citizen yourself, based on your status as married to a Mexican, but it takes a while. During those years of waiting, you'll still need to be here legally--or forget citizenship.

You can read it all for yourself at http://www.inm.gob.mx/.

Good luck!

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









travisdyer

Apr 18, 2008, 1:55 PM

Post #10 of 46 (4110 views)

Shortcut

Re: [esperanza] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Roger, do you owe on your home, or is it paid off? If it's paid off, how much can you lease it for? The rent money could be considered as your income. The only real problem with that is that you would need reliable renters, with a long term lease.

As far as immigration goes, you can enter and live in Mexico, year round, on a tourist visa, as long as you renew it. The tourist visas are available at any border town for less than $30. Just be sure to tell the official that you want to stay for six months. When your visa comes due, you would have to return to the border for a new one.

I am able to travel back and forth to Mexico, and I can stay as long as I would like. I have an internet-based business, along side of my brick-and-mortars. I have established my businesses in a way that they are self-sufficient. I focus and depend mainly on the internet as my main source of income. There are so many online opportunities, and you can earn an excellent income.

I am married to a Mexican citizen, and we opened our business in Mexico in her name. With 20 -30k, you can find numerous business opportunities in Mexico, and you shouldn't have too much trouble to find an "owner."


ken_in_dfw

Apr 18, 2008, 2:37 PM

Post #11 of 46 (4100 views)

Shortcut

Re: [jerezano] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post |
Well, now, hold on there, Jerezano. I don't think that an adequately-funded retirement is the only option for folks moving to Mexico. There are a couple of other routes...

1) If you work for a large multi-national corporation (or have good contacts for an inside track), you can pursue an expat option that enables you to work in Mexico, while being paid at least at the upper end of what professionals in Mexico make. This track requires that you have skills that the local market is missing and that the multi-national corporation needs in place in Mexico. In that case, the MNC will take care of your visa. As the song goes, "nice work if you can get it."

2) The other option is to set up a virtual-location business (consultancy, free-lance, contracted stringer) in your home country, where the services can be delivered over the Internet. These days, that is almost anything: graphic artists, business consultants, architectural draftsmen, medical coders. Heck, they've even got virtual call center agents who work out of their homes! In this case, you're working as a citizen of your home country and doing business with folks in your home country - not Mexico. Mexico just happens to be where you live. In that case, you get your own visa.

Neither route is easy nor for everyone. But there are foreigners living in Mexico and making a living today. Retirement isn't the only path to Mexico.

Ken


Brian

Apr 18, 2008, 3:18 PM

Post #12 of 46 (4083 views)

Shortcut

Re: [kenhjr] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
I retired early in my fifties but wanted to stay busy and continue to make decent money. My wife and I decided to live just north of Rosarito Beach in Baja California and I worked in San Diego with US wages and benefits including medical. When I reached normal retirement age, I quit the job and we moved to the interior of the Republic. It was an excellent plan at the time. Now, however, given Calderon's War i.e. the battle between the military and local police departments, it is no longer feasible nor safe for that matter. Maybe things will improve at the border but I doubt it will be within my lifetime...ni modo

Brian


Bethie

Apr 18, 2008, 5:49 PM

Post #13 of 46 (4063 views)

Shortcut

Re: [cristalhombre] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
There was a time when I worried whether I was making the correct decision by picking up everything, leaving a decent job and family and everything I have ever know and going to the unknown.

But, I am going to Mexico, will have only about $30K in the bank, I plan on keeping the yearly requirement in the bank and not touching it (say about $16-$17K) so that I show I have the yearly requirement. I am 48, and although will be getting married to someone from Mexico, I do worry about how we will survive. I can't dwell on this, he needs to go back and I am going. Remember, sometimes life is about taking a chance, do it while you are young enough so that if it doesn't work out, you are still young enough to pick yourself up and start over again. Don't go into it looking for a failure, be positive and enjoy the experience. If you don't do it you may be 70 years old one day saying, "I wonder what would have happened if..."

These are just my thoughts, I am sure wiser friends on this site will have some better advice. But that is the joy of this webiste, you can learn so much from so many.


jennifer rose

Apr 18, 2008, 6:31 PM

Post #14 of 46 (4052 views)

Shortcut

Re: [RogerTX] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post |
Sure, I'd do it. In fact, I did it when I was younger than you are now. And I'm still here.

Worrying about filling the Social Security coffers and saving up for your retirement is an overrated concept. Since you have some familiarity with Mexico already, you're several steps ahead of many others. Decide what skills you possess and how those could be put to use in this country, understanding that you would have to qualify for a work permit.


travisdyer

Apr 18, 2008, 9:09 PM

Post #15 of 46 (4028 views)

Shortcut

Re: [jennifer rose] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Jennifer,

I haven't yet, but I'd like to pick your legal brain for a minute.

Does internet-based income (generated from the US) require an FM3 work permit for a tourist?

Can't a US Citizen live in Mexico with just a tourist visa?

Is it possible for some one receiving rent payments to claim that as income for the FM3? I know that it qualifies as income, as far as the IRS is concerned.

I'm looking forward to your reply.


La Isla


Apr 18, 2008, 9:39 PM

Post #16 of 46 (4020 views)

Shortcut

Re: [RogerTX] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
I am 62 and moved to Mexico (Mexico City, to be precise) last year. Although I retired early from Social Security, my modest pension is not enough to live on or to qualify for a non-working FM3. I have worked as an English teacher (ESL and EFL) for many years, in the States and also abroad in Mexico and Spain. So I am teaching English in the capital (lots of opportunities here even for novices, as long as they have taken some sort of short-term training course) and working occasionally as a translator to supplement my retirement income. I am also about to apply for an FM3 "independiente", as I plan to work for myself into the foreseeable future. If any of this sounds interesting to you, feel free to send me a private reply.

Good luck!

Marsha


alex .

Apr 19, 2008, 6:35 AM

Post #17 of 46 (3985 views)

Shortcut

tourist visa

Can't Post | Private Reply
The reason that I got away with back-to-back 180 day visas for 3 years was that , exept for vacation, I was never in the country longer than 72 hours continuously. I commuted to the US 5 days per week so it was easy to demonstrate that I wasn't "living" in Mexico.

The original poster, Roger, mentioned living by the rules: Mexico is still a polite society, you have to follow the rules. Its just that some of the rules might be new to you.

And Espy, the "which culture" question is fabulous: The can is open, worms everywhere!"


Alex


(This post was edited by alex . on Apr 19, 2008, 6:36 AM)


Georgia


Apr 19, 2008, 7:22 AM

Post #18 of 46 (3969 views)

Shortcut

Re: [travisdyer] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Travis, if those rent payments are deposited directly into your bank account you can show that as income for FM3 purposes. And, no, work done for a company, located outside Mexico, done on the iternet does not qualify as Mexican generated income (thereby taking away a job from a Mexican). The work permits are designed to protect Mexican workers more than anything else. You can live in Mexico on a tourist visa - many people do, but you have to have it extended to 180 days (the maximum) and cross the border at least every six months to renew it.


jerezano

Apr 19, 2008, 7:45 AM

Post #19 of 46 (3967 views)

Shortcut

Re: [alex .] tourist visa

Can't Post | Private Reply
Hello:

Hold on there!

One of the things that Roger forgot to tell us is if he has any skills other than excellent "language and people skills," and a fluency in Spanish.

One of the things that influenced my ABSOLUTELY NOT post is that I retired as an Engineer who worked for the Federal Government. As a retired electrical engineer without industrial connections either in the USA or in México there was absolutely no opportunity to work here in Mexico. For six months or so on a voluntary basis I did help our local Federal Electrical Commission office by translating the names in an Electrical Transmission supply catalog into Spanish.

Now Jennifer who says by all means come to Mexico is a lawyer. I understand that she was able to work out some kind of arrangement where she could continue working for a USA body. So she had an assured income. Perhaps my understanging is wrong. Anyway during her time here in Mexico she has also become familiar with Mexican laws. She can always find employment whether over the table or under it. And as a lawyer physical infirmities will not prevent her working until she can no longer do it.

So what we are saying here is that some professions are moveable into Mexico and as other posters here have indicated ways can be worked out to maintain an income here in México.

As to the $30,000 in the bank. If that were in a money market fund paying 5% or so the yearly income would be $1500 simple interest. With interest on the interest quite a bit more. But, in no way sufficient monthly income for a single person on an FM3.

Roger wants to get married. Family responsibilities, including the fact that the Mexican government will require him to show sufficient income to support his wife. Even if his wife is working and could also support him. Children?

Come, let's be reasonable. The plunge into an adventure is always fun. But what if that adventure turns a bit sour, and the hero has no alternatives? Think about it seriously.

The advice given about leasing rather than selling his town house is quite good. Convert that house into an investment instead of a lump sum which will dribble away (human nature being what it is). I have rented out my own town house in McAllen, TX for some 30 years now and with the IRS allowances for depreciation, tax, agency management, mortgage interest, and all the other allowances that townhouse has been a "cash cow" over the years. The first ten years or so all the income was tax free. And I can say this with all the hazards of extended periods of no occupancy, absconding renters, and major repairs. I have seen them all.

Roger needs to think. It seems to me that he is being carried away by his desires. I agree, do what you want, but at least open your eyes to what you're doing.

The above is the advice I would give to my own son were he in the same condition that Roger is now. Fancy free, middle-aged, and looking for adventure.

Hasta luego. jerezano. PS. Back to back 180 day tourist visas are perfectly legal. There are at the present time no restrictions on obtaining the next tourist visa when one visa ends. But temporary import permits on cars are different.j


Gringal

Apr 19, 2008, 8:45 AM

Post #20 of 46 (3954 views)

Shortcut

Re: [RogerTX] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Relative to many of us, you're young. If all else fails, you are still at a point where you can go back to square one and start over. Here's my two pesos: Put a "getting back home" fund in an account and leave it there for a few years as "insurance", so you won't get stuck in Mexico it that's where you don't want to be.

Then, live your dream. Even if it doesn't work out, you'll have made some great memories of your adventure.


RogerTX

Apr 19, 2008, 8:53 AM

Post #21 of 46 (3951 views)

Shortcut

Re: [travisdyer] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Wow, before I say anything else, I really want to thank each of you for all of your input. Not only is this informative but thought provoking on a number of levels!

Travis, I don't own my home yet but have plenty of equity. I bought it as an investment with the intention of flipping it. However, the more I think about it, the more I realize leasing the home makes the most sense. I like the idea of having multiple businesses that basically run themselves and I'd love to learn more about the internet businesses you speak of. Have seen lots of spam on the topic but they usually appear to be scams.


RogerTX

Apr 19, 2008, 9:40 AM

Post #22 of 46 (3943 views)

Shortcut

Re: [Gringal] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Gringal, I LOVE the way you think! Sometimes I think it would just be better to let go of all my fears and worries, take some (calculated) risks and see what happens. If I were to end up getting deported from Mexico, then I'd know how what it's like to be on the other side of the fence (literally!).

Jerezano, no question you went about things the right way and you're enjoying the fruits of your labor. But it's not the only way and unfortunately, jobs with retirement and pension benefits are becoming non-existent in the US today. Sometimes I think if I would have just stayed in the military, I would be retired now with a pension. But then I never would have gone to study Spanish in Mexico and explored all the things I have up to now. The reality is that I, like so many other people, am now self-employed. I have a little money, a rather nice lifestyle, but am miserable like so many others here in the US. I don't want to go into all the details of why but a quick look at this board will tell you that America just isn't what it used to be.

Like Jennifer was saying, the concept of contributing to Social Security is overrated. Not to mention that word on the street is that the system won't even be there by the time I'm retired. Something tells me there won't be a refund if the SS system goes bankrupt. So much for feeling secure!

Lots more to say and comment on but I have electricians working on my house and need to go. Again, thanks to all of you for your encouragment and for helping me to see that this really is something that can become a reality for me. Would be nice to have more safety nets in place but then, what fun would life be if everything we did was safe and guaranteed?

Have a great weekend!


RogerTX

Apr 19, 2008, 10:07 AM

Post #23 of 46 (3932 views)

Shortcut

Re: [La Isla] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Well, it looks like the electricians have things figured out so I'm free again (for now). Marsha, As I read about you teaching English in Mexico City, it reminded me that I looked into it while studying there and back in the 90s, the English schools (Harmon Hall and Interlingua) would actually help you to take care of immigration issues. However, I've also read that there are many schools that give you very few hours, pay late, or some don't even pay you at all. Like most things, there's always a horror story or two out there.

Please tell me more about what you've learned in terms of not only immigration but also, in the realm of teaching English. I have very limited experience teaching ESL from back in college and to be honest, it wasn’t my biggest strength. However, what I’ve yet to mention here in the forum is that my professional background includes international sales throughout Latin American and eventually, written translation work (Eng/Span, Span/Eng), as well as court interpreting here in the Dallas area for nearly two years. I never got certified but interpreted for attorneys and some court cases while working simultaneously as a Realtor. Currently I work in the Oil & Gas industry as a Landman. I know that the petroleum industry is big in Mexico and although I’m unsure about how Landman skills would transition to Mexico, it sure would be fun to explore it!



La Isla


Apr 19, 2008, 12:19 PM

Post #24 of 46 (3897 views)

Shortcut

Re: [RogerTX] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Hi Roger,

The two English schools you mention are really at the bottom of the barrel in terms of what they offer to teachers, though they're not bad places for a novice to start. There is still a huge demand for English teachers in Mexico City, and the good ones want native-speakers, though they also look for some experience and possible a certificate. Though it can involve a certain amount of traveling around the city, the best money in English teaching is to be made from teaching business and private classes to adults. You can do this through a school or work independently (as I do) and find students on your own through on-line ads and in newspapers and through referrals, once you've established a good reputation here. You can get lots of advice on which schools do pay on time and will give you enough hours to live on from another website for expat English teachers: www.eslcafe.com. Of course, I am also happy to help.

If you can do Spanish to English and English to Spanish (something I wouldn't think of attempting, though my Spanish is quite good) translation work, especially if you can deal with technical subjects, that could be an area for you to explore. I have the feeling that it would be extremely difficult for you to get work as a court interpreter in Mexico; even official translators (those who deal with official documents, like the kind you need to get your FM3) must be Mexican citizens. I don't know what a Landsman is, but I also have the feeling that for a non-Mexican to get his foot in the door of PEMEX is highly unlikely. But I could be wrong...

Suerte,

Marsha


travisdyer

Apr 19, 2008, 12:57 PM

Post #25 of 46 (3888 views)

Shortcut

Re: [La Isla] Would you make the move to Mexico if...

Can't Post | Private Reply
Roger,

With your language skills and previous experience in international sales, I can turn you onto some great ways to broker deals for US firms. Many companies have recently moved their operations to Mexico and other Latin American countries. Also, believe it or not, many Mexican factories purchase used equipment from the US.

I will PM you with more information.
First page Previous page 1 2 Next page Last page  View All
 
 
Search for (advanced search) Powered by Gossamer Forum v.1.2.4