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Georgia


Nov 29, 2007, 8:14 AM

Post #26 of 49 (20448 views)

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Re: [beatricemor] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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Yup. Basically, here, it's "you're on my property which is replete with "stay away, high voltage, danger" signs. You fry. You die. Too bad. Stay the hell off my property." Works for me. Don't want to break your ankle stepping into a hole in the sidewalk? Look where you're walking. Visitors think Mexicans are humble because they look down as they walk. Nope. They are exercising due caution.


Georgia


Nov 29, 2007, 8:22 AM

Post #27 of 49 (20447 views)

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Re: [jerezano] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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Ah. Clearly you do not understand the social dynamics: these people do not have money. That is why they are squatters and why they use my electricity. By the way, this happens all the time. Super common here. Anyway........ the owner doesn't have any money either. Nobody who actually LIVES in my neighborhood has any money. The owners are in Guadalajara and their kids all want to go to Vallarta for the weekend instead of beautiful downtown El Chante. Times change. Real estate taxes are practically non-existent, and Mexicans, once they own property, hate like hell to sell it. So things deteriorate.

Using the law to solve this problem? Eeeek. Life is too short and my peace of mind is too important to me. Thus, I have a transformer. I have not alienated my neighbors face to face and thus opened my life and property to revenge. I have the only house in El Chante that has a stable electrical source. When the guy down the street comes home at night to start his second job of welding and draws down the power in everyone's houses on the street, my lights no longer flicker. I am a happy, if not poorer, camper.

This is a "Part B" to "can you live cheaper in Mexico?" Sometimes, yes. Sometimes, no. Actually, I'm looking forward to my next electric bill to see if it drops now that I am no longer providing electricity to seven extra people, their sound systems and their game arcade.


Georgia


Nov 29, 2007, 8:33 AM

Post #28 of 49 (20444 views)

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Re: [jerezano] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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I should have mentioned that these charming people are the numerous sons of the folks who are ostensibly the "caretakers" of the property. They live across the street. The caretaker, who apparently hasn't been paid by the tapatio owner, decided he would sell the whole thing, this in spite of the minor detail that he doesn't actually own it. He hired someone to survey the property and assess it. Nothing came of it. My gardener advised him he could go to jail for doing this. While that option might have provided him with better housing than he now enjoys, his freedom seemed more important to him than his surroundings, so he gave up the venture.

I love my neighborhood. Soap opera writers couldn't dream this stuff up. I wouldn't live anywhere else. When people ask me what's new, I don't have to discuss the evil mites that are inhabiting my potted plants. No. I have something interesting to chat about.

So, how would I get the squatters out? As part of a purchase agreement require that the place be empty of humans, dogs, cats, canaries, etc. and have the bulldozers ready on closing day after checking before handing over the pesos that the house is, indeed, uninhabited. The wall project would begin the next day. It's a dream. But it keeps me entertained.


beatricemor

Nov 29, 2007, 10:01 AM

Post #29 of 49 (20437 views)

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Re: [jerezano] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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Jerezano:

While the sorry, no-good Bubba is rightly persona-non-grata in these parts, I Beatrice Mor have access to the imbecile and will pass on your desire for some real turnips. I suspect that it is cold enough in Highland Chiapas to grow decent turnips in the Mayan fincas above, say, 9,000 feet. There are probably many fincas at or above that altitude but it may be that turnips are not traditionally consumed in that region. I´ll have Bubba look into that for you when he is in Chiapas this spring.

Bubba tells me that one can find both fresh turmeric root and ginger in the indigenous market next to his maison in San Cristóbal but their uses are medicinal and these wonderful accompaniments to a thousand fabulous dishes from China to Algeria are not used in Chiapas to make food more savory. Quelle domage!


beatricemor

Nov 29, 2007, 10:13 AM

Post #30 of 49 (20434 views)

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Re: [Georgia] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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Georgia Darlin, you have tweaked Beatrice´ funny bone and amuse me to no end. Your sardonic comments provide a primer on living in Mexico to those capable of absorbing the wisdom contained therein. My post under the Southern Mexico Forum about hillside whores has the same goal but you are funnier in your presentation. You may be the only decent attorney I ever met.


Georgia


Nov 29, 2007, 12:36 PM

Post #31 of 49 (20407 views)

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Re: [beatricemor] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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I am not now, nor have I ever been that kind of lawyer.


margretmaker

Nov 29, 2007, 1:08 PM

Post #32 of 49 (20401 views)

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Re: [Georgia] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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Hi Georgia, ah, electricity pilferage. While standing on our roof, with its recently added mirador, I noticed what appeared to be the neighbor's wire tying into our electric wires that light a series of lights that runs along our brick wall. These lights are never turned on so I assumed since the lights are not on that the neighbor can't access our electricity. Perhaps I am wrong on this. Does anyone know? Your stories get more and more colorful.


Georgia


Nov 29, 2007, 1:42 PM

Post #33 of 49 (20398 views)

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Re: [margretmaker] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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Electricity pilferage is all the rage Lakeside. One friend actually had the electrical service wire from her meter (which was a bit of a distance from her house) to her house stolen: TWICE. Guess who had to pay for it? Not CFE. Back to your question: have a good electrician come in. Barring that, shut off everything and then open all your circuits so no electricity is passing from your circuit box to your outlets, if you have a master switch to disconnect everything, disconnect. Go look at your meter. Is it moving? If it is....you are helping pay someone else's bill or you have a short somewhere. The former is more likely than the latter.


Georgia


Nov 29, 2007, 1:54 PM

Post #34 of 49 (20393 views)

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Re: [margretmaker] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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I should add that in spite of these little dramas, I do prefer living in El Chante to anywhere else. I am presently in Texas and miss El Chante more than I can tell you. I'm surprised I haven't been arrested here for housebreaking. Where my daughter lives, all the houses look the same. How was I to know it was not her house, but the house one block over? Even the decor was the same. And I can never tell which shopping center I am in: they all look the same and have the same "stuff." Why are there so many? And they are building more. In El Chante I am awakened to the sound of my rooster (who is sometimes confused about the difference between night and day) and my neighbor's donkey, Ruben (who has apparently inherited the same confusion gene as my rooster). Here, I am awaked to the sound of people honking at one another because the red light changed to green a milisecond ago and traffic is not moving at its customary 75 mph through residential neighborhoods. On my street in El Chante if you go 75 miles an hour, your rear axle will break. And in El Chante, I can always tell which house is mine: it's the one with the electrical substation on the roof and the dimlly lit next door neighbor's house.

I miss El Chante, but will be home soon.


Oscar2

Nov 29, 2007, 3:05 PM

Post #35 of 49 (20377 views)

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Re: [margretmaker] sound ordinance in ajijic?

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The bits and pieces put together by Georgia and Beatricemor telling are so typical of indigenous barrios and neighborhoods once experienced in the US of A back in those frontier days of yore in some cities even as short termed less then fifty years ago.

The color of these posts are more than interesting, they tell of what isn’t often mentioned and gets down to the nitty-gritty of real life in a Mexico away from expat enclaves. After a two-week house, hunting stay in the Ajijic village a possibility emerged. A friend of friend was selling her house and desperately had to move due in part to a legal battle and more with a construction company for services rendered and a mishap. She ultimately refused to pay and just wanted to get her butt out of town. She ultimately sold the property and moved to other environs by a beach.

Being new to living in this Mexican village peppered with expats, cobblestone, roof dogs barking everywhere in syncopation with Banda music gracing my ears, we decided to expand our house hunting. We looked toward the hills of Ajijic, but decided we needed more exploration of other parts of Mexico.

The following year, after scavenging MC, we listened to Bubba’s sojourn and positive commentary about Chapalita. Its a small predominately Mexican middle class neighborhood with old majestic homes that to this day its memories are veiled with charm and grace. It was one of Bubba’s good calls.

In the 40 or so years I’ve been coming in and out of Mexico, it’s always had a frontier flavor. In so many ways, this itself is a draw to those a bit more adventurous and who dare to extend their comfort zone beyond the so called security of the laws NoB of which some feel stifled to a point where it seems that even breathing is subject to scrutiny.

The wide open spaces tend to lead into areas of life beyond land and into personal adjustment where the mess of bureaucratic entanglements is somewhat a thing of the past but it also entails stories of woe in adjusting too its ways. Yes, there are definite trade offs and the will to do so rests entirely on re-indentifying, un-straddling and gradually surrendering to what can be a new way of life enjoyed and embraced for many years by so many. Dos Centavos.

(This post was edited by Oscar2 on Nov 29, 2007, 4:41 PM)


Gringal

Nov 29, 2007, 4:13 PM

Post #36 of 49 (20358 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] sound ordinance in ajijic?

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I don't usually comment on typos or misspellings, but this one was so good for a chuckle:

"but it also entails stories of woo in adjusting too its ways. "

Please, Oscar, tell us a little more about those tales of woo! Liked your post. It says much on what it takes to move here.


Oscar2

Nov 29, 2007, 4:49 PM

Post #37 of 49 (20346 views)

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Re: [Gringal] sound ordinance in ajijic?

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Why thank you Gringal, correction made. Its been awhile since we’ve talked but then again, we are commuters of which I’ve also noticed your foot print on the other island. We'll talk again soon. Have fun.


Oscar2

Nov 30, 2007, 9:20 AM

Post #38 of 49 (20284 views)

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Re: [Georgia] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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That is why they are squatters and why they use my electricity. By the way, this happens all the time. Super common here. Anyway........ the owner doesn't have any money either. Nobody who actually LIVES in my neighborhood has any money. The owners are in Guadalajara and their kids all want to go to Vallarta for the weekend instead of beautiful downtown El Chante. Times change. Real estate taxes are practically non-existent, and Mexicans, once they own property, hate like hell to sell it. So things deteriorate.



Georgia, I so much enjoyed your candidness. What you mentioned above in many ways resonates with the kind of truth we found a bit disturbing with the kind of dismay one would feel when you see “one” wilting and dying flower in the center of a lovely and very alive looking fresh bouquet of roses. The more we drove around this extraordinarily, attractive and almost totally Mexican neighborhood, just outside of Guad, called Bougainvillea, periodic houses like wilting flowers, desperate for survival, laid overgrown with brush totally abandoned.

Our initial mix of feelings were of the kind of “how could they do this” still gives rise to questions as to why before these beautiful properties where abandoned and left to wither, brings us full circle with what you said, “owners don’t have any money.” You’d think the bank or some investor would pick up the gauntlet and run with these exceptional properties, but it just doesn’t happen.

As we drove around and seen some of these large gorgeous well kept homes, strewn around the golf coarse –unfortunately more run down abandonment homes stuck out like dark discolored kernels in rows upon rows of fresh, inviting looking kernels of yellow corn buttered and ready for tasting.

In such gated communities NoB, this is anathema and investors would be quick to fix anything that would mar or hurt resale of surrounding properties. This in itself is where Mexico and many of its differences and its acceptance of these differences “is” where a separation point does exist. I talked to a couple of Mexican real estate people on this issue and they looked at me as if I was from another planet and they just smiled and said, this is the accepted way of life here in Mexico.

Personal reconciliation with these morays, as candidly and well related too by some, is just a matter of acceptance of what it takes to adjust to indigenous south of the boarder living. Some on this forum, from truly living amongst the indigenous experience, are very good at making this clear. Stark reality without the fluff gets closer to life in another country and in this case Mexico.

Our American differences are very much our own, hardly realized, nor will they ever intrinsically be felt by the indigenous who only hear but have never experienced life as we know it NoB. It appears that this same lack of “inbred exposure to their country differences” allows them to be wholly who they are and we as their guest in their country are trying to be who “we” are amongst a persuasion who’s back to basics kind of life style breeds hurdles for some not unaccustomed too this. Its these same differences some enjoy and some don’t but rest assured, they are generously provided anytime for the pickings. As in Rome…

More musings, more typos, more centavos, its finally raining outside, and it’s a nice day.


jsandrock

Nov 30, 2007, 10:16 AM

Post #39 of 49 (20269 views)

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Re: [margretmaker] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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All I can say after reading all these tales of relajo and insanity, is that my little family with their blaring radio (which mercifully got turned off somewhere around 2:30 this morning so I got SOME sleep) sounds really terrific! Think I'll keep the madness I have and be grateful that it isn't any worse!


beatricemor

Nov 30, 2007, 11:51 AM

Post #40 of 49 (20252 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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Georgia, I so much enjoyed your candidness. What you mentioned above in many ways resonates with the kind of truth we found a bit disturbing with the kind of dismay one would feel when you see “one” wilting and dying flower in the center of a lovely and very alive looking fresh bouquet of roses. The more we drove around this extraordinarily, attractive and almost totally Mexican neighborhood, just outside of Guad, called Bougainvillea, periodic houses like wilting flowers, desperate for survival, laid overgrown with brush totally abandoned.

The locals in Guadalajara aften call the somewhat "new rich" Bugambillias subdivision the equivalent of "narcoland" since it is reputed that so many narcotraficantes from Sinaloa live there. Maybe some of these people have been picked off by enemies and no one wants to touch their properties.

Quite seriously, the north shore of Lake Chapala is littered with abandoned mansions in disrepair. I suppose this has a lot to do with the fact that property taxes on these huge properties are so low there is no incentive to keep them up or sell them. Even if you wanted to buy these properties and fix them up you would probably find them either not for sale or outrageously expensive.

I took a really nice walk in Chapala the other day from the Chapala railroad station which has been totally refurbished as the community cultural center to Chapala Centro and I was quite impressed with the work they have done there and their exhibits of old photos of the old railroad station and tracks. From there I walked through Cristiana Park to what they call "Acapulquita", or the lakeside cafes, and then to the municipal market. A part of this walk is along the lake and the park itself is quite pleasant. This was during a week day and I had the place to myself.

I think the thing that really struck me during this walk was that here the city had spent all this (Federal, no doubt) money fixing up the old railway station as a municipal house of culture but immediately outside the grounds is a polluted creek of untreated agua negra which stinks up the whole place and flows directly into the lake from the cultural center. On top of that, the grounds adjacent to the cultural center on all sides are filthy with litter both on public and private land. There are all these municipal employees with nothing to do but chat and screw off and not one soul is assigned to maintain the surrounding area in a decent fashion.

To me this is the disgrace of Chapala and the fecklessness that characterizes the whole municipality. You don´t see this disgraceful and total lack of pride in San Cristóbal or San Miguel de Allende or San Luis Pótosi or Queretaro. Go see for yourselves. The house of culture is great and worth a visit. But just look around while you´re there. You´ll be ashamed to be a part of this community.


Oscar2

Nov 30, 2007, 1:53 PM

Post #41 of 49 (20232 views)

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Re: [beatricemor] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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The locals in Guadalajara aften call the somewhat "new rich" Bugambillias subdivision the equivalent of "narcoland" since it is reputed that so many narcotraficantes from Sinaloa live there. Maybe some of these people have been picked off by enemies and no one wants to touch their properties.




Since I can’t come up with a logical conclusion and the quality of the surrounding homes are still so well maintained, yes, maybe they were picked off and ceremoniously buried in the tunnels of Guanajuato. With that kind of fanfare, tooth chattering respect for their homes clearly is a monument to their legacy. Salute!

(This post was edited by Oscar2 on Nov 30, 2007, 1:59 PM)


Georgia


Dec 2, 2007, 8:45 AM

Post #42 of 49 (20172 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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Please understand that in spite of the realities of life in a Mexican village, I prefer it to any other set of circumstances. I don't think a gated community would allow me in anyway. I can't live by association rules. Mostly, in my home, I wish to be left the hell alone with no one telling me what to do: no building inspectors, zoning enforcement officers, dog catchers, tree huggers, whatever, infringing on my little castle. Mexico pretty much does that: both for me and my lunatic fringe neighbors. So, I don't complain to the authorities, etc., I just take care of it on my own.

So... my observations were not a complaint, just a note of interest.


Gringal

Dec 2, 2007, 9:13 AM

Post #43 of 49 (20165 views)

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Re: [Georgia] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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You go, girl!

Lived in one gated community NOB and that was enough.


Oscar2

Dec 2, 2007, 10:30 AM

Post #44 of 49 (20151 views)

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Re: [Georgia] sound ordinance and La Casa de Irritacion

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Least we forget the always-welcomed “CC&R’s” (Covenants, Codes & Restrictions). And for added comfort the additional exorbitant added homeowner tax running ramped called the "Mello-Roos."

With these mandatory additional monthly payments snapping at your heels, Mexico becomes not only inviting but also very, very attractive.


mkdutch

Dec 3, 2007, 12:38 PM

Post #45 of 49 (20113 views)

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Re: [margretmaker] sound ordinance in ajijic?

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Margretmaker, as the OP, you really touched the hearts & souls (and triggered responses from) a lot of the regular contributors on this thread (and apparently at least one Bubbalurker from Chiapas who has been drawn out of the woodwork)... Thank you, and thank them for the result: great insights into what can happen when the cultures/customs of locals & gringos "collide". As well as providing this writer with a better understanding of why somethings happen and how to cope with them. And Georgia, you are a peach (pun intended). Really enjoyed your comments.......;^).

Here's hoping this kind of dialogue continues, especially toward a Gringo's better understanding of proper responses to irritants. For example, coming from a more confrontive society NOB into one that is generally non-confrontive (and more sensitive to affronts and insults), and saying " You idiot, what the He__ did you do that for?" may elicit no immediate response from the recipient here as it might NOB, but there's a better than average chance that demeaning comment may result in some form of economic or physical retaliation later - the offender not knowing where it came from or why. Or referring to someone within hearing range as being "Stupid". Whether they understand English or not, it is "Estupido" in Spanish, and is clearly understood. Any comments on a more acceptable way to deal with these situations?...........Dutch


jerezano

Dec 3, 2007, 1:31 PM

Post #46 of 49 (20099 views)

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Re: [mkdutch] sound ordinance in ajijic?

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Georgia


Dec 5, 2007, 7:03 AM

Post #47 of 49 (20030 views)

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Re: [mkdutch] sound ordinance in ajijic?

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You are so right about the absolute need to avoid insults. Mexicans may insult one another ... and they do, big time. But that's another story. It has to do with perception of "status." So, a public insult to someone of lower status is taken very hard, and may result in subtle or not so subtle retribution: e.g. your dog may be poisoned. Honest.

Americans in general find the idea of "status" difficult. Most have very egalatarian ideas that everyone is equal in status... or at least they pay lip service to that idea. Mexicans are painfully aware of their status in regard to others. And as a result of that awareness a stinging insult is taken harder than it might be north of the border, especially when received from someone of a perceived higher status. It is important in any differences of opinion here to leave the individual's dignity intact when voicing a complaint.

None of this, apparently, applies when driving.


lmaxine

Dec 13, 2007, 6:10 PM

Post #48 of 49 (19934 views)

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Re: [margretmaker] sound ordinance in ajijic?

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Margretmaker-I'm confused. Donato Guerra begins below Constitucion. Above Constitucion the street is called Encarnacion Rosas. So, if your noisy carpenter is half-block below Lloyd's, it's on ER, not DG. Or, is it on DG? Please clarify, as I live in that neighborhood, and haven't heard that cacaphony.
"He upon whose heart the dust of Mexico has lain will find no peace in any other land." Malcolm Lowry


margretmaker

Dec 14, 2007, 7:00 PM

Post #49 of 49 (19885 views)

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Re: [lmaxine] sound ordinance in ajijic?

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Yes, you are right on the street name. It is below Lloyds next to the immigration /FM3 info office. The noise (and sawdust) is in the back where six of our lots abut one another. We've had contradictory information but it appears the carpenter who is running the business may not have a permit after all. We have a notario/lawyer helping us negotiate a solution. Thank you for your interest. I am glad it isn't disturbing you.
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