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sandykayak


Nov 5, 2007, 2:45 PM

Post #26 of 44 (3210 views)

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Re: [NEOhio1] bring everything or leave it behind?

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<<We like a hard bed so the platform is good for us, but the idea of having one made for storage purposes is terrific. >>

I bought my mattresses in Chapala. For the master bedroom I use the two twins = one king so they could be set up as two beds, if a tenat should prefer that set up. I bought the platforms (with two storage drawers each) from Mexico Rustico on the carretera toward chapala - before Clinica Maskaras.

For the guest room I got a full-size futon from Costco. They delivered for approx. $50 USD.

In Dec. 04 the cost of the whole-house voltage regulator was about $500 USD. It's a small house.
Sandy Kramer
Miami, Fla & El Parque


Anonimo

Nov 5, 2007, 3:22 PM

Post #27 of 44 (3203 views)

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Re: [thriftqueen] bring everything or leave it behind?

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Mrs Anonimo asks me to point out that your American fitted sheets may not fit Mexican mattresses as precisely as they did your NOB mattresses.

Good mattresses here are very deep. After buying a premium mattress at Sears in Morelia, we found that there were also quality mattress specialty stores where we might have shopped.



Saludos,
Anonimo


tashby


Nov 5, 2007, 3:57 PM

Post #28 of 44 (3195 views)

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Re: [dalford] bring everything or leave it behind?

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Wow. This got a lot of replies. And here I've been searching the archives with a "What to bring?" query. Much of the same information is in the old threads, but it's nice to read a whole lot of recent confirmations and other information. So thanks for starting a new thread!

My question, and maybe it deserves a whole 'nother thread, but I'm gonna try piggy-backing.....the automobile question.

From everything I've read in old threads, it sounds like ditching the NOB car and just buying a car down there will keep things a lot simpler. More expensive from what I've read, but a lot simpler. The car we *might* consider bringing down is an old '94 Honda Accord. It's only got a 100K miles on it, and like most well-cared for Hondas, it's a champ, but it may not be that appropriate for where we end up choosing to live. I'm almost certain we'll need a truck and/or something with high clearance and, possibly, 4WD. (We'll end up in the highlands somewhere....and quite possibly a small pueblo in the mountains. Not sure.)

The pros to bringing it down would be.....it's an old car that we don't particularly care about so it'd be a good "who cares what happens to it? vehicle" in Mexico. Plus, we couldn't get much for it if we sold it up here any way. The con is, at some point eventually, we'll have to get it back NOB to bury iit properly.

(So far, here is how the move is planned: We'll be using a professional moving company for our other "stuff". They'll store it NOB somewhere after we've sold our house and gone down on the scouting trip to Mexico. Once we finally decide where we want to live, we'll arrange FM3s (and maybe one of us we'll keep FMT status) and have the house stuff shipped into our locale in Mexico)

Any thoughts re the auto once we're ready to make the ultimate move? Maybe the best notion is to drive it in on a 3-4-5-6 month scout mission, then once we've decided return it across the border north, unload it, and return (carless) to our location and buy a vehicle there?


Rolly


Nov 5, 2007, 4:50 PM

Post #29 of 44 (3186 views)

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Re: [tashby] bring everything or leave it behind?

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unload it, and return (carless) to our location and buy a vehicle there?

I wish I had done that. Good idea in the long run.

Rolly Pirate


morgaine7


Nov 5, 2007, 5:35 PM

Post #30 of 44 (3175 views)

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Re: [thriftqueen] bring everything or leave it behind?

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I went for a platform, too. Mine has two storage drawers on each side. The carpenter had me buy the mattress first so that he could build it to fit. I ended up with a Serta Five-Star, "Mexican queen size", for about 2,000 pesos. It appears to be excellent quality and is soooo comfortable!!

Kate


Gringal

Nov 5, 2007, 5:48 PM

Post #31 of 44 (3171 views)

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Re: [tashby] bring everything or leave it behind?

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The decision depends on where you are moving. We were concerned about bringing a plain old 4 cylinder pickup truck. No 4 wheel drive, etc. Then we moved to a house on a dirt street. No problem. Then I noticed those little Nissan taxis running all over town with no problem, rain or shine. Your Honda might be just the thing unless you move to the boonies.

Besides, new cars in Mexico cost a lot of money that you probably don't want to spend right after the expense of moving.


tashby


Nov 5, 2007, 6:17 PM

Post #32 of 44 (3161 views)

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Re: [Gringal] bring everything or leave it behind?

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The decision depends on where you are moving. ... Your Honda might be just the thing unless you move to the boonies.

Quote

Yep. Exactly. That's the thing. Since, at this point we're not entirely sure where, I can't wrestle down the answer. One of the places we're *currently* considering is pretty much in the boonies. At the very least, the old Honda will probably make for a fine "scout vehicle" if nothing else.

Thanks, once again, to all the generous posters in this thread and on this message forum!


GueroPaz

Nov 5, 2007, 7:17 PM

Post #33 of 44 (3148 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] bring everything or leave it behind?

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Wow, it's amazing to contrast a family's needs with an individual's needs as to what to bring. I came to Mexico with two suitcases and a backpack, from Houston to Chiapas, last time. I will try to do it again, if I come. I try not to accumulate too much of what I call schhttuufff, so much stuff that you need to cram 3 storage warehouses with schtufff you haven't used for 3 years. But here I am in Thailand with 2 recent refriadors, a big teakwood bed, floor fans, a personal computer, etc. That expression about death, "You can't take it with you," applies to moving to the opposite site of the world.


thriftqueen

Nov 5, 2007, 7:52 PM

Post #34 of 44 (3143 views)

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Re: [tashby] bring everything or leave it behind?

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it's an old car that we don't particularly care about so it'd be a good "who cares what happens to it? vehicle" in Mexico.

That sounds like the perfect Mexico car. We have a 2007 Chrysler van that we just bought for ease of hauling lots of stuff and comfort while traveling as we make several trips to the US each year. We never drive it locally as it's too low and the other drivers don't respect the other person's car when driving or parking. We have an old Dodge van, 3/4 ton with heavy duty tires that we drive all over our town. Our town having many cobblestoned or unpaved caminos. At least until you decide where you are going to be it sounds like an ideal vehicle.


Georgia


Nov 6, 2007, 6:52 AM

Post #35 of 44 (3114 views)

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Re: [esperanza] bring everything or leave it behind?

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Esperanza, get yourself up off the floor! Anita has great taste. It will probably look awesome. Anyway, re: mattresses. I had always wanted, and swore when I was through with raising kids, and paying winter fuel bills that I would get a Tempurpedic mattress ... until I saw the prices in Guadalajara.

We, instead, opted to buy at Overstock.com's bulk sales: 7 memory foam mattresses for all our beds for less than one queen sized Tempurpedic mattress! We brought them down one or two at a time from our daughter's house in Texas where we had them sent. Granted, they only have a 10 year warranty as opposed to Tempurpedic's twenty year, or something to that effect. If I have to replace all the mattresses in 10 years it will probably still come out cheaper. Anyway, some of them are guest beds and get very little use.


Oscar2

Nov 6, 2007, 10:15 AM

Post #36 of 44 (3090 views)

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Re: [thriftqueen] bring everything or leave it behind?

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We have a 2007 Chrysler van that we just bought for ease of hauling lots of stuff and comfort while traveling as we make several trips to the US each year. We never drive it locally as it's too low and the other drivers don't respect the other person's car when driving or parking.



Thriftyqueen, you mentioned having purchased an 07’ Chrysler van, would that be like the mini van Town & Country? Reason being is my wife has definite sights on purchasing the new 08’ Town & Country with the Stow’n’Go feature where all the seats can be submerged below leaving a totally flat surface for larger and more convenient storage.

Not sure if this is what you have but am especially interested in your comment about it being to low. I’m assuming maybe your talking about the Topes and ruts in some Mexican roads possibly bottoming the van out. The 08’ had a major face lift with some very nice features but yes, your correct, they do seem a bit low.


thriftqueen

Nov 6, 2007, 10:39 AM

Post #37 of 44 (3083 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] bring everything or leave it behind?

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Town & Country with the Stow’n’Go feature where all the seats can be submerged below leaving a totally flat surface for larger and more convenient storage.

Yes, ours is the T & C, Stow and Go. It's our second one, we had a 2005 one. We love the S 'n'G feature as we do lots of work among the poor here in Alamos and always have lots of clothing to bring back. We buy old suitcases from Goodwill and pack them full. We have never been asked about the number of suitcases. We always have so much other personal stuff surrounding them until the suitcases don't raise a question. We always pay duty on electronic items or other such goodies. The duty is not prohibitive and then we don't have those butterflies in the stomach when crossing.

As for the car being low, no problem in the US or on the Mx highways, just those pesky topes here in town as some are unusually high. But as I wrote in my other posting the old Dodge van gets used locally. If we only had the one vehicle we would have to opt for something more suitable. One other thing, the gas mileage is wonderful, about 23 MPG highway.


sandykayak


Nov 7, 2007, 10:55 AM

Post #38 of 44 (3012 views)

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Re: [Oscar2] bring everything or leave it behind?

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A friend of mine drove to Mexico in her new mini-van. You should have seen all the dings and dents on it less than a year later!

pity to have a brand new and expensive car trashed....
Sandy Kramer
Miami, Fla & El Parque


Bloviator

Nov 7, 2007, 5:16 PM

Post #39 of 44 (2972 views)

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Re: [sandykayak] bring everything or leave it behind?

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When we came here three years ago, we bought a brand new Jeep for the grand adventure. It quickly became known as "the bumper car." When it got so badly dinged (all 4 fenders, both bumpers, etc.) that even I couldn't stand it, we went to a little hole in the wall auto body shop (to be very charitable) near El Limon?? and for $4,000 pesos the whole car was made like new. It would have been a lot cheaper except the tail light assembly alone cost $2,000 pesos.

For those of you NoB, $4,000 is about $375 US - about the cost of the consultation without any of the repairs, NoB.


(This post was edited by Bloviator on Nov 7, 2007, 5:18 PM)


Glenn

Nov 8, 2007, 7:41 AM

Post #40 of 44 (2934 views)

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Re: [Rolly] bring everything or leave it behind?

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We're planning on bringing our 1999 Mitzubishi Montera 4 wheel drive. It's got a high clearance and it's not new. I would hate for a new car to be lookin' real old after a year.


JohnnyBoy

Nov 8, 2007, 9:54 AM

Post #41 of 44 (2922 views)

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Re: [tashby] bring everything or leave it behind?

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I have been reading this thread for a while now, enjoying the comments of posters as regards their decisions about how much to bring with them to Mexico. It is an old topic but when the MexConnect Regulars deem it worthy of consideration, they post again and express themselves, even though they may feel like they have already done this too many times.

I eventually decided against the Menaje de Casa even though I did get an FM3 visa NOB. I took everything I could put into a 16' moving van to a self-storage unit in Tucson. There were a few things I could not get into the truck, notably a mattress and box springs, a lamp, a bucket, and some other stuff, all of which I miss and wish I had here. The bucket sounds silly I know but I cannot find one like it here. I flew back to the Bay Area and picked up my '97 Ford Ranger pickup. Drove it to Tucson and then began the process of bring my stuff down to Mexico (250 miles one way), which took five trips. I declared nothing at the border. I got a red light twice and had no problem convincing the Mexican aduana guy that it was just my crap. I was ready to leave anything and everything behind if they tried to screw me over with import duty of any of it, which they did not do.

I am looking for a new mattress and box springs at this time. We have a Costco here and a large Soriana Plus, as well as a Mexican Costco place called City Club. They have the stuff...for a premium price and it appears it is all middle to lower end models of the mattresses.

Dealing with issues involving my vehicle was something I struggled with mightly, seeking advice here on MexConnect and elsewhere. None of the suggestions I received seem right for me. I am a bit of a stickler about playing by the rules (because when I don't I always get caught and pay a serious price for all my mistakes in judgement) and I could not bring myself to tell an insurance agent that I resided and parked my vehicle in a place where I did not reside, or worse, where I had never set foot.

As a result the truck is stranded here. The license plates have expired along with the US insurance. I have Mexican insurance, though, and no one cares that the license plates are expired, not even my insurance company. I checked and double checked that with them. But now I am not sure how or if I can get the truck back into the USA. I haven't tried yet.

It is a good vehicle to have here. The city streets of Hermosillo are the worst I have ever seen anywhere. The drivers are the worst, in terms of what I have come expect of drivers...little things like stopping at red lights and stop signs, signaling, speeding through residential areas, cutting in and out of traffic, etc. You all know what I mean. So the truck takes the rough streets in stride and I do not worry about it getting dinged up, or even about the wreck I will eventually have. Just hope I don't get killed or badly maimed in the process.

I have been toying with the idea of selling the truck and buying a new or newer used car, probably here in Mexico. The truck is no fun to ride in more than about an hour. The eight-hour, 250 mile trips to Tucson are killers for me.

But selling the truck presents problems. I have to take it back to the border to get the permit removed. And worst of all, I have to make sure the new owner legalizes the truck. Don't you all agree that I would be taking a risk and might be in for some problems, if I sell the truck to a Mexican who does not legalize it and then gets into some sort of serious trouble with the truck? The Mexican police will think I still own the truck.

And now I read the posts here about what Mexican streets, roads, topes, and inconsiderate drivers are going to do to a new car, and that make me wonder.

The Ford dealership here all but refused to replace the alternator on my truck when it went out. They told me they would probably have to replace the entire electrical system and that all the parts would have to be special ordered from the USA. The off-the-cuff estimate was almost more than the value of the truck. They just did not want to do it. I tried to get it replaced in a few local mechanical "tallers" but I made the mistake of saying I wanted a new alternator, when I meant I wanted the dead one replaced...rebuilt would have been self-understood in any repair shop in the USA, but they took me literally here. I finally had to tell them, point by point, what to do...take the old one off, go to AutoZone and buy whatever rebuilt one they have, leaving the old one as a core trade, bring back the one from AutoZone (being careful not to refer to it as the new one), and install it. And that finally worked.

Getting the brakes fixed turned out not to be as easy to walk them through. Now my brakes seize all the time, the rear wheels drag against the drums because they are not adjusted right (after three attempts to get it right), and they make a lot noise, both when applying the brakes and when not applying the brakes, although not as bad.

The point is, I do not think you can get mechanical work done here that is of the quality or as ubiquitous I have come to expect in the USA. (I am sure somewhere here in this city there is someone who can fix these brakes, but finding him is like looking for a needle in a haystack.) And I accept that as another one of those things that I have to understand, accept, and let go of. And because of this, I think bringing any relatively new vehicle to Mexico is a mistake. Unless you get lucky or have lots of money to throw at the problems when they occur. I am pretty sure all the rattle trap bombs I see the locals driving are in that condition because they don't have the money to fix them, and even if they had the money, no one here really expects cars to look and perform like I expect a car to look and perform NOB. What they called fixed it was what I call jerryrigged to drive long enough to get it to the junkyard or the front lawn where I can take a crack at it.

I see lots of really nice cars here...Lincoln's, BMW's, super nice gigantic pickups of all kinds, Suburbans, mini-vans, SUVs of all kinds, all new, all nice. I am sure the dealerships gladly work on those cars when they need it, until they begin to look like crap and they begin the inevitable slide into looking like all other pieces of crap that are chugging and smoking down the bulevar.

So, my advice is bring everything you can lay your hands on. Bring a used, mechanically sound, high-clearance vehicle with a stout suspension system, if you can. If not, be prepared to get something like that later. And expect it to turn to total crap in relatively short time.


Oscar2

Nov 9, 2007, 10:23 AM

Post #42 of 44 (2862 views)

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Re: [Bloviator] bring everything or leave it behind?

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Bloviator, that is so funny but yet so true. The cost versus the extent of the labor is balanced differently, to say the least, in Mexico. Perhaps for us N. Americans, this is and can be a very strong draw.

A short story. I purchased a stove at a Walmart in Chapalita near Guad and split the difference with my then land lady as a good will gesture. The built in which was there for the better part of 30 years was removed by the Walmart guys and unfortunately there was a 12 inch high concrete step or slab that had to be removed before the new stove could be slid into position.

Immediately I had visions of having to return the stove because of the formidable task of perhaps having to jackhammer the large concrete slab. The gentleman who delivered said, No te preocupes. (don’t worry about it) He said he’d fix the problem in the morning. The next morning I expected him to show up with a jackhammer, not. I opened the door and all he had in his hand was a regular hammer, then he pulled out a 6-inch hand chisel.

I kind of looked at him in amazement feeling this guy was out of his perch if he feels he can knock out that huge slab with that little chisel and mentioned so and again he very calmly, with a pleasant smile said, No te preocupes Senior.

I let him in and very attentively he started pounding and pounding and pounding until my headache drove me out of the house with the screaming mimes! I went for a walk, came back later and when I heard to pounding of metal against concrete from the outside of the house I decided to get in the car and go somewhere for a few hours. I came back later on that afternoon and the pounding was still shattering the neighborhood.

It was getting dark and when I went into the house, the gentleman who was supposedly affiliated with Walmart in some way said to me in a voice filled with a combination of remorse and regret, No puedo nivel adecuadamente (he could’nt level it properly) We’ll try again tomorrow.

Tomorrow came and he never showed up. Instead I got another guy down the street doing tile work for someone else to finish to job, and he completed and installed the stove and asked for $10.00 US. I gave him 20 and it was a done deal.

The poor guy who initially worked all day and made it easier for the second guy to finish the job in a couple of hours vanished, never to be seen again. To this day, I still see him in my minds eye and something in his face which, I would describe as pious but yet with a glint in his eye voicing his pride. Even though he gave me a hell of a headache, I really liked this guy and regret I couldn’t give him something as a token of my appreciation for his efforts. Perhaps this in some small way tells of why, for me, Mexico is different and at times very special.

(This post was edited by Oscar2 on Nov 9, 2007, 2:18 PM)


Glenn

Nov 9, 2007, 12:39 PM

Post #43 of 44 (2840 views)

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Re: [JohnBleazard] bring everything or leave it behind?

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John
Thanks for your story. Even though we are not SOB yet I can relate to your tale. We lived for a couple of years on Montserat, West Indies (before the volcanos). The car? we had was horrible. We had to tie the passenger door shut or hold it closed. We we first arrived there I just couldn't believe Glen bought such a piece of junk AND PAID MONEY FOR IT but after a short time it just seemed normal. Everyone else's car looked just the same. It had no shocks and we just bounced along. I look back at those times fondly now.
Debra


Bloviator

Nov 9, 2007, 1:23 PM

Post #44 of 44 (2834 views)

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Re: [JohnBleazard] bring everything or leave it behind?

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Since you are from my hometown of San Mateo, I'll respond to your problem with the truck. You are screwed if you want to take it back to CA temporarily and want to be legal and insured. Due to CA laws you cannot get insurance without current registration and you cannot get registration without proving current insurance. Of course, you can get both, but you cannot get temporary CA insurance if you have a CA registered vehicle.

Although I'm not aware of any that will let you, you might find an insurance company that would insure you and look the other way when you cancelled the insurance a week or so later, but you would be unlikely to get away with it a second time. Of course, you would still have to keep the current registration.

I checked today with the CA DMV and found that though my car has been legally non opped, if I want to register it, I have to pay all back registration (two years) for the time that I have been away from CA. I finally gave up and sent for South Dakota registration and plates today. Now I will be able to get temporary insurance to drive in CA and if I do want to return to CA to live, I can just change my plates from SD (about $45) to CA, with no penalty.

All of this is nonsense and does not apply to people from other states. If your car is registered in TX, etc. you can get temporary insurance to drive home. I assume that to be legal, you would have to have current registration, but I don't know about that for sure.

If you really want to be legal in all things, you are just out of luck. As you mentioned, you are already illegally driving with an unregistered truck in Hermosillo, but no one cares. Evidently no one cares either if you get SD license plates, though the forms that I filled out informed me that any false statements on the application are a Class 6 felony, whatever that is. I didn't lie, I just don't live in SD - though my great uncle was a US senator from ther many years ago and my mother was born there. Maybe that makes me grandfathered in.


(This post was edited by Bloviator on Nov 9, 2007, 1:25 PM)
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