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Anonimo

Mar 26, 2007, 4:06 AM

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Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Yesterday, near Pátzcuaro, we visited a neighbor's ranchito along with a friend. Our amiga pointed out the orange trees and said "Son naranjas amargas."
I asked if they could be used to make mermelada, and she didn't know.

I'd like to know more; whether they might be used to make a tasty, coarse shred orange marmalade. I suppose I'd need pectin, wouldn't I?

(Today she and her sister and going to show us where to gather nopales to eat.)

Buen provecho,
Anonimo



caldwelld


Mar 26, 2007, 7:58 AM

Post #2 of 21 (5958 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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I have a sour orange tree in my yard (well, actually the tree is in my neighbor's yard but the oranges are in mine) and I make orange marmalade from them all the time. I give it to my neighbors and friends but Mexicans (and many others) don't normally use it - Brits on the other hand love it. It can be used however to make nice orange glazes or marinades. You will need a little pectin or gelatine. Here are a couple of recipes you can adjust to suit your conditions:

Citrus and Vanilla Bean Marmalade
- 3 to 4 Meyer lemon rinds*
- Flesh from 2 oranges*
* OR 1 1/4 pounds whole Meyer lemons
- 5 cups water
- 1 box fruit pectin
- 4 1/2 cups sugar
- 1 vanilla bean, split lengthwise
- 6 to 8 one-cup canning jars with lids and bands

Bring boiling-water canner, half full with water, to simmer. Wash jars and screw bands in hot soapy water; rinse with warm water. Pour boiling water over flat lids in saucepan off the heat. Let stand in hot water until ready to use. Drain jars well before filling.

In a food processor, grind lemon rinds as fine as possible. If using whole lemons,
work on a large plate to catch juice and cut lemons in half lengthwise, then very thinly crosswise. Discard seeds.

To soften fruit: In a large non-reactive pot (such as stainless steal), add lemon rind and orange flesh and 5 cups water. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium and simmer 10 minutes, adding a little water if necessary to keep from scorching.

Scrape in seeds from vanilla bean. In food processor or small grinder, grind empty vanilla pod and add to pot as well.

Add pectin and bring to full rolling boil, stirring constantly on high heat. Add sugar. Return to full rolling boil and boil exactly 1 min., stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Skim off any foam with metal spoon.

Immediately ladel into prepared jars, filling to within 1/8 inch of tops. Wipe jar rims and threads. Cover with two-piece lids. Screw bands tightly. Place jars on elevated rack in canner. Lower rack into canner. (Water must cover jars by 1 to 2 inches. Add boiling water, if necessary.) Cover; bring water to gentle boil. Process 5 min. Remove jars and place upright on a towel to cool completely. After jars cool, check seals by pressing middles of lids with finger. (If lids spring back, lids are not sealed and you'll need to keep them in the fridge).

Let rest in a cook dark place for two weeks before enjoying.

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Title: SOUR ORANGE MARMALADE Categories: Condiments, Jams Yield: 6 servings 2 lb Sour oranges (about 6 med. -sized) 2 qt Water 3 lb Sugar 1/2 ts Salt From: Arizona Cookbook Remove the peel from two oranges. Slice this peel very thin and cover with water. Boil until tender, adding additional water as it boils away. (Change the water often if the flavor becomes too bitter.) Peel the remaining oranges (the peel may be stored in freezer for later grating uses). Boil the pulp in 2 qts. water until very soft. Strain through a bag with pressure. Re-strain without pressure. Mix this juice with the drained peel, the sugar, and the salt and boil until the jelly stage is reached. Let stand until slightly cool. Stir and pour into hot sterilized jars
and seal with paraffin.
dondon


wendy devlin

Mar 26, 2007, 8:30 AM

Post #3 of 21 (5955 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Anonimo,

You can make marmalade without packaged pectin, if you have oranges like the Seville variety. The pectin is obtained by using the orange pips.
Here's the recipe, have used several times.

1 1/2 lb Seville oranges
4 pt water
Juice of 1 lemon
Sugar (approx. 3 lbs)

Wash the fruit and cut it in half. Squeeze out the juice and the pips. Cut the peel into shreds. Tie the pips in a muslin bag and but into a bowl with the orange and lemon juice, water and peel. Soak for 24-48 hours, covered. Transfer to pan and cook gently until peel is soft. Approx. 1 1/2 hr.

Remove the pips, squeezing the bag gently. Take the pan from heat, add 1 lb sugar to each pint and stir till dissolved. Return pan to heat, bring to boil and boil rapidly until setting point is reached.


jennifer rose

Mar 26, 2007, 8:32 AM

Post #4 of 21 (5953 views)

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Re: [wendy devlin] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Why go to that effort when pectin is readily available? Even in Morelia it can be had at a cooking supply store.


Anonimo

Mar 26, 2007, 9:21 AM

Post #5 of 21 (5949 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Ok, which cooking supply store? Trico? Superama?

Saludos,
Mike


jennifer rose

Mar 26, 2007, 10:59 AM

Post #6 of 21 (5939 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Trico and Superama are not cooking supply stores. There is a cooking supply store on Abasolo a few steps north of Lazaro Cardenas in Morelia.


Anonimo

Mar 26, 2007, 2:05 PM

Post #7 of 21 (5928 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Quote
There is a cooking supply store on Abasolo a few steps north of Lazaro Cardenas in Morelia.

Ah! Like a restaurant supply store? I'm heading there on my next visit to Morelia.

Gracias.

Saludos,
Anonimo
PS: Perhaps that is the bakery supply store a few doors from "Saldo"?

(This post was edited by Anonimo on Mar 26, 2007, 2:10 PM)


jennifer rose

Mar 26, 2007, 3:25 PM

Post #8 of 21 (5918 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Yes, that's the one. The pectina is in a jar behind the counter. The proprietor speaks English.


Anonimo

Mar 26, 2007, 6:16 PM

Post #9 of 21 (5907 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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¡Excelente! Gracias.

Saludos,
Anonimo


Anonimo

Mar 29, 2007, 6:10 PM

Post #10 of 21 (5862 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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I went today to that store, called "La Frontera". It's just south of the Saldo store, and a bit closer to Plaza Carillo.
They have a very extensive line of products and bakery equipment.
In addition to pectin, I was able buy rye flour, gluten flour and coarse whole wheat flour.
The store I'd visited last year, just north of Saldo (all this on Calle or Avenida Abasolo) was much smaller, with a more limited selection. Thanks very much, Jennifer, for a great find.

Almost next door to Saldo is a tiny bakery with no name. The baker told me it had been there 47 years. They have great looking bolillos, with a proper grigne (split along the top,slightly off center. When I complimented the baker on the cuts, he said that they weren't cuts; they were hecho a mano.
They would be the best thing since proper French petit pains. (I haven't tried them yet, but they sure look good.

Buen provecho, Anonimo

PS: Yesterday, 2 young ladies brought us a bag with approximately 4 kilos of naranjas agrias. Now I feel obligated to get to work on this project!

(This post was edited by Anonimo on Mar 31, 2007, 4:29 AM)


Anonimo

Mar 31, 2007, 4:42 AM

Post #11 of 21 (5838 views)

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Re: [jennifer rose] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Jennifer, further investigations, eg, reading about Seville Orange Marmalade, etc, in the classic cookbook, "Better Than Store Bought", reveals that the pips and membranes of the fruit are an excelllent source of pectin, thus making commercial pectin unnecessary. Further, their are Tips on Jelly Making which guide the novice through the delicate subtleties of the craft.

Now, if only I had canning jars! I plan to make a small batch and use recycled Nescafé Clásico jars.
(Yes, I recall that Ace Hardware in Morela has them, but we didn't take time to go there and check that out I suspect that they are out of stock anyway..)

I wonder if I can buy paraffin wax in Pátzcuaro? I do know that beeswax is available, but at what cost? I'm going to check this out today.

Saludos,
Anonimo


caldwelld


Mar 31, 2007, 7:53 AM

Post #12 of 21 (5828 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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If you are making a relatively small amount you can forget the parafin as this marmalade will keep well in the fridge for several months without a perpfect seal. Your coffee jars should give you enough seal to do the trick without parafin INMHO.
dondon


wendy devlin

Mar 31, 2007, 4:43 PM

Post #13 of 21 (5804 views)

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Re: [caldwelld] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Yes, most recommended canning techniques are devised for food to be kept for estimated times. Storage factors like temperature, light, etc. effect the product over time and need thoughtful consideration.

If you are only trying to keep the product for a few months and have reliable refridgeration, then like the previous poster suggested, often you can obtain a satisfactory seal from Nescafe jars and the like.

Especially when you have previously raised ingredients, jars etc. to levels of effective sterilization temperatures.

Added sufficient quantities of sugar, or salt etc. as the product requires.

Also you can add a layer of cellophane over the canning jar opening and hold it tight with a ring or elastic band after opening your marmalade.

Ja! ja! But I'm not a 'canning' doctor:)


(This post was edited by wendy devlin on Mar 31, 2007, 5:34 PM)


Anonimo

Mar 31, 2007, 5:34 PM

Post #14 of 21 (5798 views)

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Re: [caldwelld] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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I also have read of "brandy paper", where a small round of parchment paper is dipped in brandy to cover and help preserve the contents of the jar. I think Controy would be a great liqueur for "brandy paper" on Mermelada de Naranja Agria.

The project begins tomorrow morning.

Saludos,
Anonimo


wendy devlin

Mar 31, 2007, 5:35 PM

Post #15 of 21 (5797 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Well, Anomino, now it sound's like you're going in for 'designer' canning:)


Ron Pickering W3FJW


Mar 31, 2007, 8:41 PM

Post #16 of 21 (5786 views)

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Re: [wendy devlin] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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I hope he uses it for canning and not those "medicinal uses" that comes upon one every time the bottle is opened.
Getting older and still not down here.


Cynthia7

Mar 31, 2007, 9:21 PM

Post #17 of 21 (5780 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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I use Press and Seal..brought it from US but have seen it at Cosco.


Anonimo

Apr 1, 2007, 11:32 AM

Post #18 of 21 (5755 views)

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Re: [Ron Pickering W3FJW] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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After finishing the preparing, cooking and canning of a test batch of mermelada, I'm now having a medicinal brandy. ;-)

I started at abbout 5 a.m. cooking the washed and scrubbed oranges, then boiling them in plain water until tender. Although the recipe in my book, "Better Than Store Bought" suggests 6, large Seville Oranges, boiled for an hour, the 12, small to medium Mexican Seville (?) Oranges were done in about 35 minutes.

They are cooled in the liquid, which is reserved. Then each orange is cut in half, and the pips and membranes are scraped into a wide, copper clad bottom, stainless steel Revere Ware pot).
That pulp is cooked with the water for an hour. This step extracts the pectin. This mess is then food milled.

The resulting strained pulp is mixed with the finely cut peels. (I did that with a sharp knife on a cutting board, 2-3 peels at a time while the pectin was extracting.)

(We then went for a walk)
On our return, I divided the total into two batches of about 6 cups each. To each I added about 6 cups of sugar. There's also fresh lemon/lime juice in it. Each batch is cooked over a fairly high flame until the mixture thickens, and the liquid falls from the spoon in sheets rather than droplets. (Yeah, right.)

Now its poured into sterilized jars, and, in some caases, a circle of brandy paper is placed on the gel before sealing. In other cases, I said, the heck with it, and just dribbled a little brandy on top of the marmalade.
The jars are wiped off with a hot, damp towel.
(I just heard a lid, "POP!")

This looks pretty good, and the tiny tastes we had indicate that it's worth it. However, I wouldn't think making any less than 4 pints is worthwhile.

(Tip to Myself: Get the proper jars ahead of time next time you plan to make this.)

Buen provecho,
Anonimo


caldwelld


Apr 5, 2007, 10:37 AM

Post #19 of 21 (5721 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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My brother just sent me a recipe he uses that calls for a half pint of scotch wiskey (instead of vanilla) in the preparation. Not sure this has anything to do with preservatives. But he swears it adds greatly to the flavour. (that would be cheap scotch one hopes)
dondon


drfugawe


Apr 21, 2007, 9:49 AM

Post #20 of 21 (5673 views)

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Re: [Anonimo] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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Congrats on your successful endevour. I hope in your use of those sour oranges, you make sure you use some to marinate a pork shoulder roast (in the Cuban style w. plenty of garlic). Once tried, you'll never forget it.

We are winter guests to Mexico each year, and our trip back to Oregon takes us through California's citrus belt. Since one such area lies well north of what is commonly thought of as citrus country, on one of our trips we stopped at a grove (Orland, CA) and spoke with the owner about his experiences growing citrus that far north. He said that in some years the sweet oranges were impacted, but that the sour oranges have never suffered a cold spell. Apparently, they are among the most frost resistent of the citrus family. He sold me a seedling Chinese sour orange (Zulan), which he said was even more frost tolerant than most.

I'm currently growing that sour orange, along with others varieties in the ground in SW Oregon. I protect them well each winter, and they have survived temps down to 27F with only minor damage. Each year they grow, they increase their survival chances.
john
_________________________

"Self-respect: the secure feeling
that no one, as yet, is suspicious."
H.L. Mencken
____________###



Anonimo

Apr 21, 2007, 11:38 AM

Post #21 of 21 (5664 views)

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Re: [drfugawe] Naranjas Amargas para Mermelada?

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drfugawe, good idea about the pork roast. I had been thinking of cooking cochito al horno Chiapaneco style, but your comment on sour oranges gives me a new idea. Of course, there's the famed Yucateco Cochinita Pibil, rather a big deal to make, but it can be super delicious.


Buen provecho,
Anonimo

(This post was edited by Anonimo on Dec 14, 2007, 3:05 AM)
 
 
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