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Gringo ghetto?




oringo

Jul 18, 2010, 6:03 PM

Views: 8412

Gringo ghetto?

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Why self-degrading?
Is that defensive psychology such as blacks call themselves as n-words?
Or an act of simple humility?
I'm not a gringo but gringos are very admirable people, I think.
No matter any sites you go you see this self-inflicting mentality of a certain group. And they are dominant opinion leaders
in a few sites. May be inspired by Hollywood crowd too much?
I'm gonna check it out in a few weeks.



Gringal

Jul 19, 2010, 8:59 AM

Views: 8246

Re: [oringo] Gringo ghetto?

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Semantics. Sometimes, to take the rebuffs offered by others and treat terms ironically. As you pointed out, to use it oneself as a shield, as in: "I live in San Miguel de Allende, in the Gringo Ghetto". Considering the cost of doing so, the irony is thicker than peanut butter.

On this forum and others, the term is sometimes used by other expats as a mild insult to those who choose to live in places with a large population of English speaking people.
As in all such petty things, it's utter nonsense.



oringo

Jul 19, 2010, 1:15 PM

Views: 8159

Re: [Gringal] Gringo ghetto?

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Sematics. But I felt there is more than that. I don't intend to throw flame for argument sake. The major consideration for being an expat is the financial and weather to the most of gringos (sounds better than north Americans). Exotic culture and adventure are the icing on the cake. It is also the economics to host countries. They need $$$$. Then the more expats drop the money in the host countries, the merrier. But some reason there exists under-lying sub-culture among the expats who look down and despise the expats living in a certain communities and maintain life styles. They preach that assimiliating to local culture in their neighborhood is the proper way or being respectful. It defeats the purpose, isn't it?

Yes, expats have to follow the local customs, rules and laws. But whoelse has more discipline than gringos out of more than 180 countries in the world in that aspects? There are outlaws, child molestors, all sort of bad guys in north Americans also, but let's focus in macro view. I am saying this from the eyes of non-gringos. Majority gringos break the law of the host countries and establish territorial crime syndicates? I believe most of them are enjoying their retirement in peace whether they live in the gated mansions or dungeon in the neighbor. The idiosyncrasy of the north American, stay out of someone-lse's business. But some gringos' call nosy-ness of the third world culture as friendliness. There is no scientific clear cut line between friendliness and nosy-ness, it depends on each situation.

Well, this subtle difference is actually tolerable and can be ignored. But there is one place where angry north Americans dominate and conquered all the web sites and you will be stamped and kicked out unless you do bad mouth to America. There was seroius discussion how to denounce US citizenship without paying the fees and in another site there were a tremendous applause when someone called USA as United Mistake of America. It reminds me of the guy who bought 5 houses by his own stupidity and was angry blaming George Bush after he lost all and no place to lie down. True story. I know him personally. So I decided that is not a place I should be after spending hard earned money to check it out. And I stumbled upon this site.

It is so amusing that I couldn't take my eyes off from this site. So open and lots of humors, pathos. As a matter of facts, same posters here and there mostly. It must be the moderator who determines the flavor of the site. One moderator on another site is so helpful and give out very friendly and detail advice to anyone but s/he is somewhat Stalinish or Maoite, if anyone touches his nerve it is over. No fun to read unless you want to pick up some practical infos. But my English is too short to comprehend some Shakesperian style of posts here with only compulsory educational background.

Anyway, I am looking for a place to live with bare minimum stipend. I can't afford to live in the gated mansion or alike kind. But I have tremendous respect of norte americanos' 'live and let live' spirit. "Gringo ghetto" reminds me of "United Mistake of America". A little too much, in my mind.



Vichil

Jul 19, 2010, 1:39 PM

Views: 8145

Re: [oringo] Gringo ghetto?

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You should know before you come here that Mexico is part of North America and Mexicans are North Americans. Some Europeans confuse Latin America with South America but Mexicans are North Americans. GFor someone who does not like the term Gringo Ghetto you sure are using the word gringo a lot when referring to expats or foreigners.



chicois8

Jul 19, 2010, 1:48 PM

Views: 8141

Re: [oringo] Gringo ghetto?

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It seems that you have switched the word gringo for North Americans in your post:

"weather to the most of gringos (sounds better than north Americans)."

and North America is Canada and the USA,

You do realize Mexico is in North America..............
Ocanahua, Jalisco
San Mateo, California



yTABDGdW

Jul 19, 2010, 4:05 PM

Views: 8083

Re: [chicois8] Gringo ghetto?

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Oringo, please post more often. You are strangely interesting.



careyeroslib

Jul 19, 2010, 6:58 PM

Views: 8024

Re: [oringo] Gringo ghetto?

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I'm not a Gringo. I am Canadian, living in much of the year in Mexico. I prefer precise terms.



robt65

Jul 19, 2010, 7:16 PM

Views: 8011

Re: [careyeroslib] Gringo ghetto?

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I am also a Canadian living in Mexico and married to a Mexicana. Nothing wrong with the terms and most times it is used only as an Identifier. Nothing on my forehead (or yours) says Made in Canada. It's no different than saying Mexican or Mexicana. Get over it and try not to be so typically Canadian. "When in Rome . . . . . . " A lesson in Spanish for you http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=gringa robt65



DavidHF

Jul 19, 2010, 7:19 PM

Views: 8009

Re: [careyeroslib] Gringo ghetto?

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In Reply To
I'm not a Gringo. I am Canadian, living in much of the year in Mexico. I prefer precise terms.

You're a gringo.



MazDee

Jul 19, 2010, 7:46 PM

Views: 7983

Re: [DavidHF] Gringo ghetto?

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You're right. Most scholars say gringo means "foreigner". The term has been around for hundreds of years, was 1st used in Spain, and had nothing to do with Americans! So, Canadians are gringos, too. Unless you don't like that theory...

Meanwhile, I am totally confused about what Oringo is saying. Maybe I'm confused because most of the rich people in the big houses and gated neighborhoods in Mazatlán are Mexicans, not foreigners. And living like a Mexican could mean anything from a 2 million dollar house to a plastic shack. Lifestyle, likewise.



Casa

Jul 19, 2010, 7:51 PM

Views: 7978

Re: [DavidHF] Gringo ghetto?

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Not too long ago there was a discussion on Mexconnect.......

http://www.mexconnect.com/..._reply;so=ASC;mh=25;



robt65

Jul 19, 2010, 8:03 PM

Views: 7971

Re: [careyeroslib] Gringo ghetto?

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If you want more precise then make that sign to read . . . .I am a Herring Choker, a Bluenoser or a Canuck or what ever provence you are from. That ought to be fun trying to teach a Mexican! the word Gringo or Gringa seems to come from two qualities according to the dictionaries. One is a pale skined person that speaks English. By the way it is also a taco in some parts of Mexico which makes eating a Gringa . . . OK!

As in A "Gringa" is a class of Mexican 'Taco' (food). Is a "tortilla" of flour with bistek or any another class of meat (carnaza, "al pastor", tripa, lengua, etc) and a lot of cheese of "adobera" with coriander and onion stung. they are done with 'tortilla' of corn too. Here in Jalisco is very common to eat "Gringas".
Hey Rafa yo quiero dos gringas de bistek y una gringa de "al pastor"

Hey Rafa I want two gringas with bistek and one gringa "al pastor"
http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=gringa With or without hot sauce is your choice!

robt65



robt65

Jul 19, 2010, 8:15 PM

Views: 7967

Re: [oringo] Gringo ghetto?

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Origin of the word Gringo http://www.urbandictionary.com/...go&defid=2017065 The word originated in Mexico, when the United States of America invaded Mexico in order to appropiate half of its territory, back on mid 19th century. Of course this action against "peace and freedom" is not in elementary school textbooks in USA, but it is in any other serious document about USA history.

American soldiers entered the country through the Gulf of Mexico, taking down the main port of Veracruz and then heading towards Mexico City. The troops were wearing GREEN COATS.

Mexican people along the way from Veracruz to Mexico suffered the advance of the enemy and many battles were fought. However, the American army finally reached Mexico City and took the city down in an epic battle still remembered by all the Mexicans: The battle of Chapultepec Castle. This palace, in the top of a hill, is the highest point over Mexico City: there was the Mexican flag, so it was a symbolic target.

The headquarters of the Military College were in Chapultepec castle too, and when the "green coats" were climbing the hill, a few young cadets refused to leave and decided to defend the castle to death. Then, when the battle was helplessly lost, one of the cadets took the Mexican flag, wrapped himself on it and jumped off the cliff were the castle is set, dying in the rocks below, thus avoiding the American army to take the flag. When the American commander saw the corpses of the cadets, he said in amazement "They are only children!". So they became in death Los Niños Héroes, the symbol in Mexico of the resistance against invaders: the American army... the green coats.

The war was over and USA claimed half of Mexico's territory... then the green coats went home, having gained possesion of Texas and other territories -and their resources- (the same old motif than nowadys, but the speech has changed).

Ever since, the relationtship USA-Mexico has developed into a very complex love-hate relationtship and the destiny of both nations is linked together, but back then, a new term was born in popular language: gringo (green coat)

Now, let's make clear that the term is used nowadays the same as affectionate as pejorative and as none of the above too. As complex as it seems, Mexican people can use the word with different intentions but in any case with just one meaning: it refers in a common way to USA citizens, who are distinctive not because of the colour of their skin, but because of their culture and behavior (anyone outside USA knows exactly what behavior is it!)

Other derivatives of the word include:

gringa: female for gringo, as substantive.

gringo/gringa: as adjectives.

agringado: something/someone that resembles USA culture or the American way of life.

Gringolandia: U.S.A.

As a final note i must say that the word spread to other countries over Latin America (even to Spain) where it is used to refer to foreigners and/or white people: but that's just the way some people outside Mexico understand the word!

Nevertheless, in Mexico, a "gringo" is just an American citizen. And it implies nothing else.
* Gringo loco!
Crazy American!

Las películas gringas tienen los mejores efectos especiales.
American films have the best special effects.

Las gringas son facilotas.
American girls (springbreakers) are promiscuous.

Esa casa es de estilo agringado.
That house has an American-like style (meaning it is a new rich tasteless house)

Los gringos creen que son los policías del mundo.
Americans think they are the police of the world.

En Gringolandia pasan todas las desgracias: meteoritos, tormentas y ¡hasta Godzilla!
In U.S.A. happens all kind of disfortune: meteores, storms and even Godzilla!



norteño

Jul 19, 2010, 10:09 PM

Views: 7942

Re: [robt65] Gringo ghetto?

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The bit about "gringo" coming from "green coat" is pure urban myth, as is the claim it comes from the song "Green Grow the Lilacs". As another poster said, it has been traced back hundreds of years to Spain. It came from the word for "Greek" and by extension meant any foreigner.



Peter


Jul 20, 2010, 2:37 AM

Views: 7910

Re: [norteño] Gringo ghetto?

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I've heard those stories and others. I must give Robert credit for the flourish. Griego Gringo makes sense. I prefer gringo over gabacho, which supposedly started as a pejoritive in Spain to refer to the French. Gringo is more common and rolls off the tongue easier. I take it in the spirit of early American colonists being referred to as Yankees by the British. So instead of taking it as an insult they write a drinking song declaring themselves a Yankee-doodle dandy.

I live in Michoacán about as segregated from gringos as I can get. It's only the past year that I bothered to make any contacts with the local gringo community. I meet regularly with the local gringo group now but still keep at least an arm's distance.

Coming to Mexico I had two options, that I would either start out at Chapala on my own and intermingle with the ex-pats there to get the lay of the land, or I had a friend in California that would give me an introduction to friends and family in Morelia. And so my coming to Mexico took the latter route and I have violated just about every piece of good sense I have been given or that I would give to others myself and have thus far done the right thing, the best thing, to benefit in my situation.

I have had a lot to learn and have a lot yet but I just about have the Ugly American thing kicked.

Bush sucked. He is the reason I wanted to leave the Dept. of Defense, I didn't like playing bad cop worldwide. I was disgusted by his crappy grammar, lack of world savvy, his resemblance to Alfred E. Neuman, etc., but was blessed with his transparency and securing my financial freedom was ensured. I owe it to "W" that I even considered early retirement, had a desire to leave the US, and playing the smart moves that were all too predictable to make a bundle out of thin air, cash out, and make my exit soft and slow.



robt65

Jul 20, 2010, 5:53 AM

Views: 7890

Re: [Peter] Gringo ghetto?

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It is all myth . . . . or history . . . . or Mythical history. What is important is not what is said, but how it is used and to what reference. When ever I come to Queretaro, one of my Mexican friends shouts in his large booming voice . . . . "AH es mi amigo Gringo Roberto" . . . . and he is being genuine about it. That is what is important. He could be saying, Ah it is my tall friend, or my fat friend . . or my calva (bald) friend. To me the most important of these words is the word friend accompanied with the sincere smile on his face. At least that's the way I see it.

robt65



Hound Dog

Jul 20, 2010, 8:15 AM

Views: 7841

Re: [robt65] Gringo ghetto?

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If you want more precise then make that sign to read . . . .I am a Herring Choker, a Bluenoser or a Canuck or what ever provence you are from.

Provence is a province but only one province is Provence and that is in France, not Canada.

The "discussion" of the word "gringo" is an absurdity and unworthy of debate. "Gringo" is a critical epithet applied in much of Mexico to any pale skinned foreigner including, among the indigenous Chiapanecos, Mexican born mestizos. Unless it is directed affectionately at a close friend or relative, it is a word never uttered in a collegial sense face-to-face with another but is either a mild or serious insult depending on the context in which it is used. For a pale skinned foreigner to use the self-deprecatory word "gringo" is the 1950s equivalent of what I used to hear in Alabama as a youth when African Americans, seeking the approval of European Americans, referred to themselves as "...us colored folks....". The most seemingly innocuous words used to identify people by race, ethnicity, religion or even geographical origin can lay the foundation for rationalizing future stronger disdain which, in turn, can lead to acts of violence.

By the way, during the recent World Cup matches when Germany was trouncing Argentina, the Latin American announcer on the Telecable station we were watching kept referring to the German team as "Los Gringos".


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on Jul 20, 2010, 8:16 AM)



Papirex


Jul 20, 2010, 8:16 AM

Views: 7839

Re: [robt65] Gringo ghetto?

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I believe your and many other peoples perception of the causes of the Mexican-American war is inaccurate. Texas was an independent republic for about 14 years before it was annexed by The United States. It was not invaded, it was a revolt by the inhabitants, just as California was separated from México by a revolt by the inhabitants. California was an independent republic for about 3 years before union with The United States. The California state flag still has a banner across the bottom of it that says “California Republic.”


My family was involved in the meeting in Sonoma, California that started the California revolt. They were not Americans, they had immigrated to Alta California from Nova Scotia.


The Mexican-American war was caused by border disputes, not by expansionism.


US military uniforms were blue, not green at the time of those wars.


While there may be some inaccuracies, and it is a commercial site, this link may provide some clarifications about The Mexican-American war: http://www.historyguy.com/...an-American_War.html


Rex
"The supreme happiness of life is the conviction that we are loved" - Victor Hugo



robt65

Jul 20, 2010, 8:47 AM

Views: 7821

Re: [Hound Dog] Gringo ghetto?

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Thank you for the correction of my spelling, of coarse (used intentionally) you are correct sir! It is indeed province. now on to the subject at hand, the word Gringo. I sure am glad there are other (more educated opinions, than yours or mine) . . . . as I have said before . . . . . it is all myth . . . . . no proof of either history or myth being correct, so far as I have been able to research and besides . . . . . . . what does it really matter? It is the inflection and tone that certainly identifies the intention of the sender to the receiver! IMHO . . . . but then again . . . . the last time I tried walking on water, I got wet right up to you know where!

Robt65



robt65

Jul 20, 2010, 9:09 AM

Views: 7804

Re: [Papirex] Gringo ghetto?

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"My family was involved in the meeting in Sonoma, California that started the California revolt. They were not Americans, they had immigrated to Alta California from Nova Scotia."


Ah Good Morning Rex,

With all due respect to you and your family, It is a grand historic moment that your family was a part of that meeting in Sonoma. I have only a few questions of the accuracy of your "facts". 1. In what capacity were your family in attendance?
2. Where were you at the table? (tongue in cheek) 3. What position did your family have in the California revolt . . . not that we are speaking to that revolt? What I am again trying to say is that history is many times watered down only to what one, a few or some perceive that "historical event to be" IMHO IMHO historians arer no better or worse than many a fisherman! . . . . . that 1 lb trout grows with each teling of the "facts?" until they have a world record 139 lb trout and almost lost their life getting it into the boat!


Now on to the uniforms and their color.

Development of Work Uniforms; 1900 to World War I
The twentieth century brought a new element to naval warfare – the airplane. Aviation created anew set of requirements for clothing where the wear of whites or blues was considered impractical while flying aircraft. Specialized work clothing that was comfortable and more durable was needed. Prior to 1917 naval aviators dress was unrecognizable and generally imitated that of their civilian counterparts. However, fliers began to utilize the Marine Corps’ khakis (introduced in 1900) as a work garment more appropriate than the dungarees afforded other naval officers.


Entry into WW I expanded the air arm. The regulations of 1917 allowed naval aviators a summer uniform of khaki (designed paralleling the service dress blue and white uniforms), as well as a khaki shirt. In September 1917 the forestry green of the Marines was authorized as a winter uniform for naval aviators as an alternative to the cotton khaki of summer. The need for rank identification while wearing a flight jacket over a shirt eventually evolved into metal shirt collar devices, rather than the bulky hard shoulder boards.
http://www.history.navy.mil/.../uniform_history.htm

Khaki, in those days were closer to green than the light color beige or brown that we know Khaki to be today.

Robt65



richmx2


Jul 20, 2010, 9:09 AM

Views: 7804

Re: [robt65] Gringo ghetto?

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Except Provence is not a "Province" -- not since 1790, when France was divided into Départments.


http://mexfiles.net
http://mexicobookpublishers.com



arbon

Jul 20, 2010, 9:19 AM

Views: 7802

Re: [Hound Dog] Gringo ghetto?

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Many upper- middle class Mexican tourists visit Québec, La Belle Provence, (in Canada that is bi-lingual)
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~




robt65

Jul 20, 2010, 9:19 AM

Views: 7802

Re: [richmx2] Gringo ghetto?

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TOUCHE!



robt65

Jul 20, 2010, 10:22 AM

Views: 7770

Re: [arbon] in Canada that is bi-lingual)

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Not unless your French it isn't! (smiling) I was born there as an Irish (english speking) Canadian .. . . tell me about it!

Robt65



Vichil

Jul 20, 2010, 1:00 PM

Views: 7716

Re: [richmx2] Gringo ghetto?

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Actualy the latest are the "Regions which are more like the old provinces" and anything that is not in Paris or its banlieu is considered "en province" known as the boonies by the Parisians.



chinagringo


Jul 20, 2010, 2:21 PM

Views: 4816

Re: [oringo] Gringo ghetto?

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Obviously, I certainly have no problem with the word, Gringo or its use!

As to the Ghetto connection: the word does have a certain connotation and could be replaced with slum, hood, jungle, turf, bowery, zoo, barrio, project (all negative) OR on a more positive and politically correct note: neighborhood, enclave community, balliwick, district, suburb (more positive).

Since we have been visiting the North Shore of Lake Chapala since before 2000, that is the only area I can comment on. Going back over ten years allows one to step back and observe the changes in the area. In recent history anyway, Ajijic has enjoyed the reputation as being a place where artists, writers and such congregated. Along with this group came along some foreigners, who enjoyed the company of such. Formal developments were far fewer and out of necessity, most catered to a mix of foreigners and Mexicans. In the ensuing period, construction of new developments has exploded and a very high percentage of them attracted the foreign buyer. While Ajijic certainly has its share of Mexican residents or home owners, in my estimation the concentration of foreigners has multiplied dramatically with a high percentage living in all of the developments surrounding Ajijic. To grasp a "snapshot" of the differing concentrations on the North Shore, all one has to do is compare just who are the typical customers in the restaurants, stores, markets or the tianguis in Ajijic versus the same in Chapala.

So we must accept that there is an abnormal concentration of foreigners in the Ajijic area. So if Gringo is accepted as a definition for foreigner, then what descriptor is added to it to describe the "hood"? Ghetto works but so do all of the other terms identified above. What the heck - if we cannot laugh at ourselves, then life isn't much fun!
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM




robt65

Jul 20, 2010, 2:36 PM

Views: 4808

Re: [Vichil] Gringo ghetto?

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"Actualy the latest are the "Regions which are more like the old provinces" and anything that is not in Paris or its banlieu is considered "en province" known as the boonies by the Parisians."


Don't let Hound Dog see that one! (smiling)

Robt65



Hound Dog

Jul 20, 2010, 2:45 PM

Views: 4806

Re: [chinagringo] Gringo ghetto?

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As to the Ghetto connection: the word does have a certain connotation and could be replaced with slum, hood, jungle, turf, bowery, zoo, barrio, project (all negative)

"Barrio" is not a negative . Barrio means neighborhood and nothing more. It is in the United States that that word has been given a negative connotation because of fear of largely Latino neighborhoods among some other segments of the population.


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on Jul 20, 2010, 2:45 PM)



Gringal

Jul 20, 2010, 2:49 PM

Views: 4793

Re: [chinagringo] Gringo ghetto?

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Amen and halelluia, CG. IMO, people take a lot of this much too seriously. We should, and do, have bigger issues these days, as well documented in other threads recently.

I suppose we could use "Gringo enclave" as a kinder, gentler, nomenclature, but in fact, most of the Village neighborhoods, and most of the other Lakeside towns/villages have some expats and some Mexicans, mixed thoroughly. The "enclave" concept could more correctly be applied to some of the newer communities, gated and otherwise, which are primarily occupied by expats.

Some of this reminds me of the hilarious pieces on "the gangs of San Miguel", with each type labeled and joked about.

Maybe someone with the proper degree of levity could do one on "the gangs of expats" in general. We could start with the "native costume" gang and go on to the "shorts and sport shoes anywhere" gang and the "border promotion gang".........



robt65

Jul 20, 2010, 2:54 PM

Views: 4788

Re: [Gringal] Gringo ghetto?

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Hey Gringal,

You go girl! . . . . Bang on!

robt65



chinagringo


Jul 20, 2010, 2:54 PM

Views: 4788

Re: [Hound Dog] Gringo ghetto?

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Dawg:

I believe that the word Ghetto originated in Venice and then moved on to other foreign (non-Mexican) countries, so when linking it to the term Barrio, it would be the foreign meaning/connotation that is useful. I fully realize that it has a far different meaning in Spanish and in Mexico!
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM




chinagringo


Jul 20, 2010, 3:03 PM

Views: 4785

Re: [Gringal] Gringo ghetto?

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And this comment coming from someone recently banned on TOB! Congratulations by the way!

And are you forgetting that greater Ajijic is the location of: "The Premier Gated Community"? Are non-Gringos even allowed to own property there?
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM




tashby


Jul 20, 2010, 3:08 PM

Views: 4783

Re: [chinagringo] Gringo ghetto?

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One thing is certain. Gringos never get tired of talking about.......gringos.



Gringal

Jul 20, 2010, 3:12 PM

Views: 4780

Re: [chinagringo] Gringo ghetto?

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Hey there........I wasn't really banned..........it's just a technical glitch......but it did give me a bad computer day. ("oh me oh my, what have I done???" They've actually been very helpful about getting it fixed.

About that "Premier Gated Community" (caps per tradition): you couldn't pay me to live there, but that's probably the nicest place that fella ever lived, so I give him some slack about it. Gimme the Village Ghetto, however. Walking to everything.....with no parking hassles. Yess!


(This post was edited by Gringal on Jul 20, 2010, 3:16 PM)



chinagringo


Jul 20, 2010, 4:02 PM

Views: 4762

Re: [tashby] Gringo ghetto?

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'One thing is certain. Gringos never get tired of talking about.......gringos."

And what would you expect when Gringos make posts such as the following on a public MX forum?
"If there is a law in Mexico City against fireworks when people are sleeping, I wonder how that law came about. I know many Mexican people (mostly women) who also hate them. Maybe we should get a petition going"
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM




tashby


Jul 20, 2010, 4:31 PM

Views: 4756

Re: [chinagringo] Gringo ghetto?

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Sorry, Neil. I was just responding to the thread in general, not you specifically. Don't know what the quote about fireworks from some other forum has to do with much other than, "Maybe we should start a petition" is priceless. So thanks for the laugh.



chinagringo


Jul 20, 2010, 4:38 PM

Views: 4752

Re: [tashby] Gringo ghetto?

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Just an example of a Gringo forgetting where they are and behaving in a questionable manner!
Regards,
Neil
Albuquerque, NM




wendy devlin

Jul 20, 2010, 5:02 PM

Views: 4744

Re: [chinagringo] Gringo ghetto?

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This thread just begs for my inaccurate take(no time to look up the actual) quote by Betty Davis:

"Call me, anything, you like. But, just call me!"

Relationship. One word, with a big old wide world of meaning.



DavidHF

Jul 20, 2010, 6:11 PM

Views: 4730

Re: [wendy devlin] Gringo ghetto?

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Call me anything but late for dinner!



YucaLandia


Jul 21, 2010, 9:11 AM

Views: 4657

Re: [chinagringo] Gringo ghetto?

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When did self-deprecation go out of style?

Just as my Polack in-laws tell decades of more (really good) Polack jokes than anyone else I've known, just like African Americans call each other the so-called "n-word", just like our Jewish friends love to tell JAP jokes, how is referring to ourselves now as Yucogringos, or Gringals, etc so different and unacceptable?

When an old jewish friend of mine refers to himself as a "viejo Yucogringo" with a twinkle in his eye with locals (particularly Maya), they crack up with laughter - as he continues to regale them with funny tales, and as he probes around (trolls) for their experiences and opinions.
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p.s. Our Mexican family and friends find "YucaLandia" just as silly as "ChickyLandia" et al: a good spoof using nonsense words.
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Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Jul 21, 2010, 9:15 AM)



Hound Dog

Jul 21, 2010, 11:09 AM

Views: 4626

Re: [YucaLandia] Gringo ghetto?

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Well, Yucalandia. We ole Alabama boys call ourselves and our good friends "redneck" but only among friends and close family, never in front of auslanders unless, of course we are shining one of them on as Senator Sam Ervin used to do when he referred to himself often in public in a heavy drawl (disguising a brilliant mind) as "...just an ole country lawyer from Nawth Cahlina" but that was gamesmanship. The same sort of gamesmanship I used as a national bank examiner and, later, commercial loan quality control consultant in the San Francisco Bay Area. Those effete snob bankers in the Bay Area never took the fat redneck attired in the shiny lime green suit and light brown brogans and speaking with a heavy southern accent very seriously when I opened my pie hole to remark as to the marginal quality of their commercial loan portfolios and then, after they were caught off guard, I´d whack they ass.

Reminds me of when we moved to San Francisco from Mobile and, while at a Barclays Bank high falutin cocktail party at an exclusive men´s club (in those days) on Nob Hill, a smart-assed San Francisco banker asked my wife where she was from before moving to the Bay Area and she replied, "Paris originally but most recently I lived in Mobile.". The banker responded, "Mobile! Mobile, Alabama? How could you live there. The place is full of rednecks.", to which my wife replied in turn, " Tell me, I married one."

Drumroll and Rimshot


(This post was edited by Hound Dog on Jul 21, 2010, 11:13 AM)



robt65

Jul 21, 2010, 5:29 PM

Views: 4559

Re: [wendy devlin] Gringo ghetto?

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Hi Wendy,

Your showing your youth! (smiling) I think that both of these were originally quotes or take offs of quotes from Mae West! Weren't they?

Robt65