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If you could change Spanish...




sergiogomez / Moderator

Aug 15, 2009, 2:38 PM

Views: 30669

If you could change Spanish...

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Here's a random thought that popped into my head the other day: If the language learning gods gave you an opportunity to change one thing about the Spanish language, what would you choose?



Rolly


Aug 15, 2009, 3:21 PM

Views: 30660

Re: [sergiogomez] If you could change Spanish...

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I'd get rid of reflexive verbs.

Rolly Pirate



La Isla


Aug 15, 2009, 8:53 PM

Views: 30637

Re: [sergiogomez] If you could change Spanish...

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I know this is asking for a lot, but what about getting rid of the subjunctive?



Peter


Aug 16, 2009, 6:03 AM

Views: 30622

Re: [sergiogomez] If you could change Spanish...

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I would get rid of verb conjugations altogether and make the distinction with pronouns. English does fine like that. English does fine without a future tense. Spanish without subjunctives would just not be Spanish. Is it not the language that uses them the most extensively? Without reflexive verbs what would we use instead to really be confused?



esperanza

Aug 16, 2009, 8:16 AM

Views: 30609

Re: [Peter] If you could change Spanish...

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Wait...Peter, English makes do with pronouns rather than verb conjugations? English has no future tense? Ay ay ay!

There's a little book that I would recommend for every native English speaker who is studying Spanish: http://www.amazon.com/...arning/dp/0934034303. Part of the reason Spanish is sometimes difficult for native English-speakers is that most folks slept through or have forgotten grammar classes in grade and high school. This book explains what you need to know so you can learn Spanish more easily.

Here's an example of the subjunctive in English: "If it were me, I'd go to the movies instead of that party he planned to attend."

Peter: here's an example of how verbs change in English, just as they do in Spanish:
I run.
You run.
(He, she, it) runs.
etc.

Peter: here's an example of the future tense in English: "We'll be there tomorrow night at about 7:30." (We'll is a contraction of we shall, definitely the future tense.)

Order that book! It's a huge help.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









(This post was edited by esperanza on Aug 16, 2009, 8:18 AM)



Peter


Aug 16, 2009, 9:17 AM

Views: 30598

Re: [esperanza] If you could change Spanish...

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Yes, a long time since school days and I'm sure I've forgotten a bunch. But learning Spanish has been a great refresher, and an eye-opener.

Add "s" to third person present singular, English conjugation. It's not that difficult in past tense, do nothing. Infinitives are like the present tense, add "to" to make the infinitive. Notice I didn't say present indicative, no need, there really isn't a subjunctive. To go, I go, you go, he goes, we go, y'all go, they go. Spanish ir, voy, vas, va, vamos, van. But that's here, in Europe I have to say vais if I don't want to be too formal with y'all.

Of course there are irregular verbs in English. English "Be" is the verb it seems we most conjugate. There is I AM, you ARE, he IS, but then it's once again, we ARE, y'all ARE, they ARE. And "be" also contains our subjunctive "were," but English does not use much subjunctive. Be that as it may (a subjunctive phrase) most English subjunctive is in the form of word construction.

Much of English is word construction, it is how we differentiate past tense from imperfect, there is no conjugation or tense that does it. I went to the park, once. I went to the beach often as a kid.

I might say I am going to learn Spanish, I will learn it. Those are examples of how I express the future, but those are examples of word constructions and not actual verb tenses, not conjugations. In Spanish, voy a aprenderlo, o, lo aprendere'.

Though we share a lot of common phrases, word constructions i.e., voy a..., tengo que..., etc., you cannot compare Spanish grammar with English. It is difficult to compare any language with English. Its simplified grammar is in part why it is the number one second language in the world, that and that it is the world language of money.

But have I forgotten that much? Is there some future tense to English I have forgotten? Example, please.


(This post was edited by Peter on Aug 16, 2009, 11:22 AM)



wandita

Aug 16, 2009, 4:20 PM

Views: 30563

Re: [esperanza] If you could change Spanish...

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Actually, many adults today never studied any grammar at all. They were taught English with a different system than the older people who took old-fashioned grammar classes. I'm so thankful I studied grammar because it has helped me a lot in Spanish and I couldnt' imagine not knowing it.



esperanza

Aug 16, 2009, 4:55 PM

Views: 30561

Re: [Peter] If you could change Spanish...

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I posted at length in response to Peter's second post, but that post has disappeared. Anyone know where it went?

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com










sergiogomez / Moderator

Aug 16, 2009, 8:39 PM

Views: 30552

Re: [esperanza] If you could change Spanish...

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I haven't seen it. Same thing has happened to me a couple times, where I post something and the computer mysteriously swallows the post somewhere along the way. It's incredibly frustrating.



Peter


Aug 16, 2009, 9:32 PM

Views: 30550

Re: [sergiogomez] If you could change Spanish...

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That only happens to me when I post at length, or so it seems. A power bump swallowed a post I had already been working on half an hour today for another thread.



robrt8

Aug 17, 2009, 6:55 AM

Views: 30540

Re: [Peter] If you could change Spanish...

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In Reply To
... Is there some future tense to English I have forgotten? Example, please.


I'm fixin' to...

I've got another tip for ya', Peter. Download a Mexican dictionary to your spell-checker. Type without the accents and see what happens.
You can switch between the two idiomas on a page.



mazbook1


Aug 22, 2009, 1:37 PM

Views: 30457

Re: [La Isla] If you could change Spanish...

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I'm with you, La Isla. I fear I won't live long enough to master the correct usage of the subjunctive as used by native Spanish-speakers. I more-or-less understand it, but use it in conversation…¡no way!…ain't happening.



La Isla


Aug 22, 2009, 2:24 PM

Views: 30449

Re: [mazbook1] If you could change Spanish...

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When I wrote that I'd like to get rid of the subjunctive in Spanish, it was said mostly tongue in cheek because, as a former Spanish teacher, I was always telling my students how important the subjunctive is in Spanish and, yes, it's used a lot, and, yes, it's used in everyday conversation, not just in writing and formal speech. I can use it when I speak and write, but except for certain situations where it's always used (like after "para que" and "cuando" when you're talking about the future and sentences beginning with "quiero que...."), I often have to stop and think to myself, "Do I need the subjunctive here?" It's always a challenge, but I am proud of myself every time I use the subjunctive correctly without thinking. It takes time, mazbook1, but eventually it will happen!



La Isla


Aug 22, 2009, 2:41 PM

Views: 30451

Re: [robrt8] If you could change Spanish...

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In Reply To

In Reply To
... Is there some future tense to English I have forgotten? Example, please.



If by future tense you mean that the verb changes form to express a future time (as verbs do in English for present and past), then, no, strictly speaking, there is no future tense form in English. But there are several ways to express a future idea in English, and learning which ways to use when is actually quite difficult for those learning our complicated language.

There are four basic ways:

1) "going to" + infinitive without "to": "We're going to leave for Mexico next week"

2) "will" + infinitive without "to": I'll give you a call later."

3) present continuous tense: What are you doing tomorrow afternoon? I'm meeting with my lawyer.

4) present simple tense [mostly for timetables]: My flight leaves at 3:00.

Hope this helps, Peter!


(This post was edited by La Isla on Aug 22, 2009, 2:44 PM)



mazbook1


Aug 22, 2009, 3:45 PM

Views: 30443

Re: [La Isla] If you could change Spanish...

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La Isla,

Well, I am a depression baby rather than a baby boomer, so I'm generally a bit older than many on this forum, and I honestly believe that I probably won't live long enough to master the Spanish subjunctive.

When a Spanish teacher and translator says, "…I often have to stop and think to myself, "Do I need the subjunctive here?", I know that foreign-language-stressed folks like me definitely don't have enough years left. Besides, who, in normal conversational give-and-take, has time to "stop and think"? For me it's more like "say and regret"!

You would think that someone who wrote a book on speaking Mexican Spanish for new expats and tourists would speak it better, but I write it a whole lot better than I speak it, as when writing, I have the time to "stop and think".



La Isla


Aug 22, 2009, 4:28 PM

Views: 30440

Re: [mazbook1] If you could change Spanish...

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In Reply To
La Isla,

Well, I am a depression baby rather than a baby boomer, so I'm generally a bit older than many on this forum, and I honestly believe that I probably won't live long enough to master the Spanish subjunctive.

When a Spanish teacher and translator says, "…I often have to stop and think to myself, "Do I need the subjunctive here?", I know that foreign-language-stressed folks like me definitely don't have enough years left. Besides, who, in normal conversational give-and-take, has time to "stop and think"? For me it's more like "say and regret"!

You would think that someone who wrote a book on speaking Mexican Spanish for new expats and tourists would speak it better, but I write it a whole lot better than I speak it, as when writing, I have the time to "stop and think".


I'm not technically a baby-boomer since I was born a few months before the "official" cut-off year for that generation, but I take your point. Age does play a big role in second-language learning. I tell my adult students that after the age of 15 or so, it becomes increasingly difficult to learn to speak a new language, especially if one wants to acquire a native accent. Something to do with certain brain circuits that are not as receptive to new languages after the mid-teens. That's why someone who grows up bilingual finds it fairly easy to pick up a third and fourth language, while those of us who haven't had this good fortune struggle while learning a second language as adults.



esperanza

Aug 22, 2009, 6:08 PM

Views: 30433

Re: [La Isla] If you could change Spanish...

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It took me almost five years of trying to figure out how and when to use the Spanish subjunctive. Once I started trying to master it, I could count the time almost to the day from the beginning of huge frustration to the "AHA!" moment when it clicked into place.

And click into place it did. One day, I was riding with three friends in a car, heading for a forgotten destination in Tijuana, still trying to puzzle out the blankety-blank subjunctive while listening to their mile-a-minute Spanish conversation. Suddenly, without struggling, I knew. I knew how to use it, and use it I did. I don't know what happened, but it felt as if a switch was pulled in my brain and I got it. I got it, by George, I got it.

And if it happened to me, it can happen to you.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com










mazbook1


Aug 22, 2009, 6:53 PM

Views: 30422

Re: [La Isla] If you could change Spanish...

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La Isla,

You may be correct when you say, "Age does play a big role in second-language learning. I tell my adult students that after the age of 15 or so, it becomes increasingly difficult to learn to speak a new language, especially if one wants to acquire a native accent," but there are studies that refute that.

However, that was not what I was refering to when I said I was "foreign-language-stressed". I had just as much problem learning German when I was 18-20 years old as I have had learning Spanish after 60 (after 70 now), and I nearly flunked out of Latin when I was 14. No, foreign languages and I just don't seem to get along with each other. Fortunately, I have a very understanding Mexican wife, Mexican kids and extended Mexican family and they put up with my bad (but extremely polite!) Spanish.



tashby


Aug 23, 2009, 4:31 PM

Views: 30388

Re: [sergiogomez] If you could change Spanish...

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In Reply To
...change one thing about the Spanish language, what would you choose?

Too many words.



robrt8

Aug 24, 2009, 9:53 PM

Views: 30345

Re: [sergiogomez] If you could change Spanish...

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False cognates.



mazbook1


Aug 25, 2009, 6:08 PM

Views: 30315

Re: [tashby] If you could change Spanish...

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tashby,

Too many words? Gosh, English has nearly 4 times more words than Spanish. I'm just glad I'm learning Spanish as a second language and not English.



mazbook1


Aug 25, 2009, 6:12 PM

Views: 30313

Re: [robrt8] If you could change Spanish...

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robrt8,

By golly you're right! English has far too many false cognates with Spanish. I'll bet they're even derived from Latin as are nearly all Spanish words. ;-)



La Isla


Aug 25, 2009, 7:44 PM

Views: 30297

Re: [mazbook1] If you could change Spanish...

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I believe that most if not all false cognates between English and Spanish come from Latin. I love them because they are one constant theme of my English classes. My students are always so surprised when I explain, for instance, that "actual" does not mean the same thing in English as it does in Spanish. Since there are so many true cognates, the ones that break this pattern can be quite disconcerting to them!



zaragemca

Nov 12, 2009, 11:53 AM

Views: 29463

Re: [La Isla] If you could change Spanish...

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Greeting, I think somebody said that there is no future in the English language. Well, I think that the future forms in English are formed with the words, WILL and WOULD, like, 'I WILL GO, and, I WOULD GO. Gerry Zaragemca
International Club of Percussionists



norteño

Sep 23, 2010, 5:04 PM

Views: 23783

Re: [zaragemca] If you could change Spanish...

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I am surprised that no one has wished for the elimination of gender in Spanish--a totally pointless complication, and one that continues to create difficulty in learning vocabulary long after all rules of grammar have been mastered.



Peter


Sep 23, 2010, 9:33 PM

Views: 14263

Re: [norteño] If you could change Spanish...

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      I am surprised that no one has wished for the elimination of gender in Spanish--a totally pointless complication, and one that continues to create difficulty in learning vocabulary long after all rules of grammar have been mastered.


Some of my Mexican friends don't understand the confusion I have with noun gender and corresponding articles. I have to explain to them that in English only people and animals have gender (not absolutely accurate but reasonably so for illustration purpose) and English articles are neutral.

The only definite article in English is "the" and the indefinite articles are "a" and "an" for singular, plural nouns do not use them except that the pronoun "some" is used as a plural indefinite article in some cases. The list of articles in Spanish is much larger and there are irreglarities - el día, for example.

I agree. Thanks for mentioning this.


(This post was edited by Peter on Sep 23, 2010, 9:38 PM)



morgaine7


Sep 23, 2010, 10:08 PM

Views: 14252

Re: [norteño] If you could change Spanish...

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Gender doesn't bother me much per se, but I could do without the "gotcha" nouns like problema and agua (masculine).

Kate



La Isla


Sep 23, 2010, 11:16 PM

Views: 14249

Re: [morgaine7] If you could change Spanish...

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Problema is indeed masculine and uses the masculine articles (el, los, un, unos). I believe it has something to do with its Greek origin, as is the case with some other words ending in a but which are masculine, such as el drama, el poema, and el clima. Others, such as el día and el mapa, have a Latin origin, and this has something to do with their grammatical gender. Perhaps someone who has actually studied the Classics could give a more detailed explanation than I. (:

Agua is a different case entirely, however. It is is feminine in gender but because it begins with a stressed a-, to avoid pronunciation awkwardness, it uses the singular masculine definite article, hence, el agua. However, in the plural, it uses the feminine article, hence las aguas. Other words of this type include el águila, el alma, and el hada.

The above is the kind of neat stuff you learn when you have been a Spanish major in college!



esperanza

Sep 24, 2010, 5:03 AM

Views: 14247

Re: [La Isla] If you could change Spanish...

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Quote
...Problema is indeed masculine and uses the masculine articles (el, los, un, unos). I believe it has something to do with its Greek origin, as is the case with some other words ending in a but which are masculine, such as el drama, el poema, and el clima...


There are other nouns (and yes, from Greek origins) that also appear to be feminine but are in fact masculine.
  • el síntoma (symptom)
  • el mapa (map)
  • el día (day)
  • el tranvía (trolley)
  • el idioma (language)
  • el telegrama (telegram)
  • el profeta (prophet)
  • el cometa (comet)
All nouns that come from the Greek preserve the gender they have in that language. They don't follow the Spanish rule that nouns ending in 'a' are feminine. You'll notice that most of these Greek-origin nouns end in -ma or -ta.

Still other nouns--not of Greek origin--end in -o and appear to be masculine but are in fact feminine:
  • mano (hand)...but in the diminutive it changes to manita
  • foto (photo...the full Spanish word is fotografía)
  • radio (radio...the full Spanish word is radiografía, which means 'radio' and not 'X-ray')


http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com










Bennie García

Sep 24, 2010, 5:26 AM

Views: 14242

Re: [esperanza] If you could change Spanish...

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Just to confuse non-native speakers more, las manitos is used in most Spanish speaking countries other than Spain and Mexico.



Rolly


Sep 24, 2010, 7:30 AM

Views: 14235

Re: If you could change Spanish...

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I hate su, too confusing.

¿Dónde está Juan y Maria? En su casa.
My house? His house? Her house? Their house?

Rolly Pirate



mevale

Sep 24, 2010, 8:40 AM

Views: 14223

Re: [Rolly] If you could change Spanish...

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In Reply To
I hate su, too confusing.

¿Dónde están Juan y Maria? En su casa.
My house? His house? Her house? Their house?


In this case, if you wanted to say Juan and Maria were at home, you would simply say "En casa." "En su casa" sounds awkward and strange to my ears, unless you're talking about a case when they are in the home of somebody else, in which case you have to go by context.



Rolly


Sep 24, 2010, 9:29 AM

Views: 14209

Re: [mevale] If you could change Spanish...

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It may sound strange to you, but that's what I hear a lot.

Rolly Pirate



Judy in Ags


Oct 20, 2010, 11:07 AM

Views: 14125

Re: [tashby] If you could change Spanish...

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Too many words.????

I'd say too few words.



tashby


Oct 20, 2010, 1:43 PM

Views: 14112

Re: [Judy in Ags] If you could change Spanish...

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Quote
Too many words.????


It was a joke. That didn't work.



mazbook1


Oct 20, 2010, 5:18 PM

Views: 14102

Re: [mevale] If you could change Spanish...

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melvale, I don't know what "brand" of Spanish you speak, but I must agree with Rolly, "en su casa" is the ONLY way I've ever heard that answer said in Spanish by native Spanish speakers. In this context (answering a specific question) the "su" can't refer to anyone except Juan y María. Leaving out possessive pronouns isn't the same as leaving out personal pronouns, and I've never heard it done.

"en casa" is particularly bad Spanish as an answer to the question ¿dónde estan Juan y María? as it could be any house anywhere. If they were in someone else's house the answer would probably be something like this: "estan en la casa de José alla", referring to José's house "over there".



Peter


Oct 20, 2010, 5:42 PM

Views: 14094

Re: [mazbook1] If you could change Spanish...

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As a non-native speaker either one would make sense to me, "en casa" I would interpret to sounding like the English "at home" but consulting my in-home expert Tere tells me the answer "en su casa" would be the correct response UNLESS Juan y María happened to live in the same house with me, then it would be correct for me to answer "en casa."

I'll stick my neck out a bit and suggest there may be regional or colloquial variation, but I will defer to Tere who was born and lived in Mexico City until she was about 15 as speaking a representative version of Mexican Spanish.



mazbook1


Oct 21, 2010, 4:29 PM

Views: 14072

Re: [Peter] If you could change Spanish...

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Peter, I never even thought about the case where Juan y María lived in the house with me. Tere is absolutely correct that in this case and this case only, the answer, "en casa" would be correct. Even though I get asked this question often (I have a family of 5 besides myself), I don't think I have ever used just "en casa" to reply, it was always, "es en su recamara", "es en baño", "momentido", etc. For me, "en casa" just doesn't work well.



mevale

Oct 22, 2010, 8:34 PM

Views: 14036

Re: [mazbook1] If you could change Spanish...

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In Reply To
melvale, I don't know what "brand" of Spanish you speak, but I must agree with Rolly, "en su casa" is the ONLY way I've ever heard that answer said in Spanish by native Spanish speakers. In this context (answering a specific question) the "su" can't refer to anyone except Juan y María. Leaving out possessive pronouns isn't the same as leaving out personal pronouns, and I've never heard it done.

"en casa" is particularly bad Spanish as an answer to the question ¿dónde estan Juan y María? as it could be any house anywhere. If they were in someone else's house the answer would probably be something like this: "estan en la casa de José alla", referring to José's house "over there".


Well, my brand is the brand I speak with my Mexican friends. Please Google "está en casa" and you'll quickly see what I'm talking about. I get 40,500,000 results. I can't believe you've never heard it, or consider it "bad Spanish". I hear it all of the time.


(This post was edited by mevale on Oct 22, 2010, 8:56 PM)



norteño

Oct 22, 2010, 8:34 PM

Views: 14034

Re: [mazbook1] If you could change Spanish...

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"En casa" for "at home", meaning the home of the person or persons referred to, is standard, correct Spanish.



mevale

Oct 22, 2010, 8:53 PM

Views: 14030

Re: [norteño] If you could change Spanish...

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In Reply To
"En casa" for "at home", meaning the home of the person or persons referred to, is standard, correct Spanish.


Thanks "norteño". These people had me thinking I had lost my mind.

A few examples from Spanish media:

"Zsa Zsa Gabor ya está en casa
La actriz se sometió hace cuatro semanas a un reemplazo de cadera" (headline from Estrella Digital)

"Confirman que Hanna Yaneh está en casa y con buena salud" (headline from TVN Noticias)

"Christina Aguilera ya está en casa con su hijo Max Liron" (headline from Son Famosos)

"Al fin, despues del milagro, Mía ya está en casa con sus papás" (headline from Clarín.com)













mazbook1


Oct 22, 2010, 9:16 PM

Views: 14022

Re: [mevale] If you could change Spanish...

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melvale, It's not worth arguing about. Up here in Sinaloa they say "está en su casa" which YOU said was incorrect and/or bad Spanish. Rolly says he hears that all the time over in the Torreon area, and I have never heard it any other way here in Mazatlán. Rolly lives with a Mexican family and my family is 100% Mexican (we don't even speak English at home).

I definitely don't trust Google listings for that sort of comparison, as they can be VERY misleading. Check the correct spelling of Tlaltelolco against the incorrect spelling, Tlatelolco if you don't believe me. Just because a lot more folks spell things wrong or use incorrect grammar or depend on lousy translations from English doesn't make them correct. Goggle just tells you how many people are doing so.

But all it means is that your friends speak a slightly different brand of Spanish than the family Rolly lives with or my family. When I get into these sorts of discussions on some international Spanish language forums, everyone identifies where they learned Spanish and how it is spoken there; it's only polite to do so.

I apologize it I was off base, but I didn't start it, you and Rolly did.



Peter


Oct 22, 2010, 11:01 PM

Views: 14014

Re: [mazbook1] If you could change Spanish...

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I don't think I have ever used just "en casa" to reply, it was always, "es en su recamara", "es en baño", "momentido", etc. For me, "en casa" just doesn't work well.

Even though "en casa" worked for me, a non-native speaker, though my darling better-half disagreed, I will by-pass asking her in this case and say in your examples that I would prefer "está en su recamara" and would use "está" over "es" when referring to the present location of a person.



mevale

Oct 23, 2010, 7:05 AM

Views: 14002

Re: [mazbook1] If you could change Spanish...

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In Reply To
melvale, It's not worth arguing about. Up here in Sinaloa they say "está en su casa" which YOU said was incorrect and/or bad Spanish. Rolly says he hears that all the time over in the Torreon area, and I have never heard it any other way here in Mazatlán. Rolly lives with a Mexican family and my family is 100% Mexican (we don't even speak English at home).



Sorry, but I never said it was "wrong" or "bad Spanish". Please read more carefully. I said it sounded awkward.

Let me give you an example in English. If I were to ask a friend where his wife was and he replied "At her home", it would be correct English but it would sound awkward and strange. "At home" would be the more natural reply. Same thing in Spanish. When I ask a Mexican friend where his wife or kids are, the reply is never "en su casa", but always "en casa" with the "están" implied.


(This post was edited by mevale on Oct 23, 2010, 7:06 AM)



mazbook1


Oct 23, 2010, 12:50 PM

Views: 13978

Re: [Peter] If you could change Spanish...

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Peter, Yep, you caught me! A big thumbs up. I should have written "está" instead of "es". Obviously, I'm a poor proofreader of my own stuff.

PS – I agree with Tere, the "su" is necessary AND normal.


(This post was edited by mazbook1 on Oct 23, 2010, 12:52 PM)



eyePad

Oct 24, 2010, 3:27 PM

Views: 13943

Re: [mazbook1] If you could change Spanish...

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As is my wont, when confronted with such a seemingly trivial question "en casa" or "en su casa" I had to research a bit. Apparently this question really is trivial because academically it is not covered (at least at first look). In colloquial Spanish "en casa" is not only fine, it is very common. "en su casa" is quite understandable also.


(This post was edited by eyePad on Oct 24, 2010, 3:32 PM)



colibri1

Oct 27, 2010, 8:58 PM

Views: 13887

Re: [sergiogomez] If you could change Spanish...

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WOW...I'VE BEEN WISHING I COULD CHANGE SPANISH...AS I GET MORE AND MORE INTO LEARNING VERB CONJUGATIONS....BUT... THE THING IS...ONE HAS TO LEARN THE CULTURE BEHIND THE SEEMINGLY INANE MANNER IN WHICH THEY ARE CONJUGATED. I UNDERSTAND THE TOO MANY WORDS THING...IT'S TOO MANY ARTICLES AND PREPOSITIONS AND LET'S NOT FORGET THE "PERSONAL A"... WELL, MY CONLCUSION IS THAT, I'D JUST BETTER BUCK UP AND LEARN THE INS AND OUTS IF I WANT TO COMMUNICATE WITH MY NEIGHBORS, BECAUSE SPANISH, AND MY NEIGHBORS, WOULD NOT BE SO INTRIGUING IF THE LANGUAGE WERE NOT SO.
ABRAZOS A TODOS,
M
PS YEA..JUST WHEN YOU THINK YOU'RE GETTING THE GIST OF THE CONJUGATIONS IN YOUR LESSON PLAN, THEY THROW IN A ZINGER THAT BLOWS YOU OUT OF THE WATER!!! OH WELL, PRACTICE, PRACTICE, PRACTICE!!!


(This post was edited by colibri1 on Oct 27, 2010, 9:10 PM)



surjo666

May 6, 2011, 2:29 AM

Views: 12925

Re: [sergiogomez] If you could change Spanish...

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The reflexive verbs. Never really liked them.



mazbook1


May 6, 2011, 1:10 PM

Views: 12901

Re: [surjo666] If you could change Spanish...

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sujo666, Heck, the reflexive verbs are EASY compared to the subjunctive!



alex .

May 7, 2011, 5:06 PM

Views: 12858

Re: [mevale] en casa

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I interpret "en casa" to mean "at home". All this discussion makes me grateful that my English is more gooder than my geography ;<)


(This post was edited by alex . on May 7, 2011, 5:08 PM)