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Forums  > Areas > Jalisco's Lake Chapala Region


shoe


Aug 11, 2003, 3:58 PM

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ARRIVED

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I arrived very, very later Friday night in Ajijic. Bad timing but more on that later.

Looked for a place to rent on Saturday and Today (Monday). I have checked with both Remax, Century 21, Hernandez, Caldwell, Ajijic Rentals, Leguna. I miss anybody I should go to.

Best places so far seem to be in Villa Norte, Villa del Lagos, La Floresta areas. My definition being 2 bd, 2 bth, fair kitchen, gated parking if possible. Like the idea of a fireplace as I get cold very easy. Hated Kentucky because of that. Cool here now in the morning as it must be about 70, maybe less. Any ideas out there? I will check this site tomorrow before I commit to anything. I have to get on with it as they are going to kick me out of the Casa Flores soon.

By the way, that is a greaat place to stay. I just got lucky and got a room there. Walt and his wife are great people.

HELP if possible...........

Nothing is intrinsically good or evil, but its manner of usage may make it so.
-St. Thomas Aquinas



johanson


Aug 11, 2003, 6:46 PM

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I like Eager and Asc in Ajijic. Their tel #s are 766-1918 and 766-1917 But I am not sure that you need to check with every office. Most belong to an MLS and share listings.



Pete


esperanza

Aug 11, 2003, 7:10 PM

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Are you looking for a place to rent or to buy?

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Bubba

Aug 12, 2003, 7:46 AM

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Re: [johanson] ARRIVED

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I second Johanson. Eager & Associates did outstanding work for us. They also have a rental management arm. The Eager family has been here many years and their agents did a really great job in helping my wife refine her ideas as to where she should buy, listened to her and understood what she was looking for; thereby not wasting her time .


alans727


Aug 12, 2003, 7:57 AM

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shoe


Aug 16, 2003, 12:56 PM

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UPDATE......... I will ignore your puns but the status is Ajijic Rentals had the most rentals it seemed. The additional thing I liked about them is they handle everything like electricity, phone, gas and anything else. You just give them a deposit and that is it. They had the satellite dish hooked up for me and everything like that was done for me. I really don't want to do much so it works for me.

I wound up in Villa Nova on Real Yukky or at least that is what I thought they said at first. It is really Rio Yaqui.

Every month you have to replenish the deposit on the utilities. Now Lloyds will also pay some of the utilities out of your account I know. It just depends on how you want to do things.

shoe

Nothing is intrinsically good or evil, but its manner of usage may make it so.
-St. Thomas Aquinas


mkdutch

Aug 17, 2003, 4:59 AM

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If you later decide to buy rather than rent, Visit with Mary Martin at Ajijic Realty. Ajijic Rentals used to be associated with Ajijic Realty, but is now a separate company. Mary is a real pro: a former California Broker, who has an excellent understanding of the area and will spend the time necessary to meet your needs. She and her firm will assure that title is clear, there are no hidden fees or leins against the property and the transfer is properly handled. Can't stress how important this is in Mexico. Buena Suerte!.......Dutch


shoe


Aug 18, 2003, 10:42 AM

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Thanks, but no more anchors in my life any more. I am not going to buy a house. I have had enough of them.

Nothing is intrinsically good or evil, but its manner of usage may make it so.
-St. Thomas Aquinas


Bubba

Aug 18, 2003, 8:05 PM

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shoe


Aug 19, 2003, 9:14 AM

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sandykayak


Aug 19, 2003, 11:27 AM

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umm...have I missed something, shoe?

You have found a place to rent but have not given us information-starved readers any details on size/amenities or cost?

what do you mean by "no information to give" ???

Surely you are not telling us that you will ask and accept info from the board but are not willing to give back??????
Sandy Kramer
Miami, Fla & El Parque


Bubba

Aug 19, 2003, 11:51 AM

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sandykayak


Aug 19, 2003, 12:56 PM

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shoe


Aug 22, 2003, 11:23 AM

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OOPs......I guess I should have said more.

OK, I got a nice 2 bedroom, 2 bath, fair size kitchen, fireplace, washer and drier, automatic gate for the truck, totally furnished house in Villa Nova, which is on the west side of town. Gardener included, as is water, garbage pickup, association fees, roving guards and the like. Leased for $625 for 6 months.

It has a satallite dish so I can subscribe to a lot of stuff. If I stay here though I will probably change to DTV. This is a test to see if I like it here. So far so good for almost two weeks.

It is about a mile walk to town and does me good I guess but if I get too much stuff I take a cab back which is $3 which maybe too much but I didn{t care as I was tired and have a lot of stuff to carry. Walk or drive as the mood hits or what I am going for.

Ask more questions if you wish answers from the first impression type of thing. Been here two weeks almost. I still have to post the trip down which was a mess, but tells how wonderful the Mexican people are.

Joined LCS already as that was important as I wanted the Spanish lessons stuff and the death benefit stuff.

Nothing is intrinsically good or evil, but its manner of usage may make it so.
-St. Thomas Aquinas


Kip


Aug 22, 2003, 2:23 PM

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Hi Shoe,

Were there a lot of rentals the equivalent of yours? It sounds great. Keep up the information, I for one am extremely interested. Things that might seem trivial are things those of us who haven't made it down yet can learn from.

Kip
kip


shoe


Aug 23, 2003, 11:29 AM

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Yes, there were a fair amount of rentals like this one. I spent about three days with 9 realtors and each one has their own rentals and they all had some. Some better than this one with better furnishings, bigger, less price or more. This was the one that met my wants but there were others also. I am not sure why I chose this one. Probably the rental place as I didn't have to do anything. Might cost me a little but I really don't care at this point as I am only interested in finding out if I like it here right now. It is a 6 month test, that could extend into a year.

The part that had bugged me was the agencies really don't keep their sites updated very well in general on rentals. They make their money on selling and don't believe that they sell or rent over the internet I don't think. Everything is done person to person. You can even bargan on the rental price I found out. Make an offer and see what happens. Horse traders it seems.

Nothing is intrinsically good or evil, but its manner of usage may make it so.
-St. Thomas Aquinas


Kip


Aug 23, 2003, 11:47 AM

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Velllly interesting. What is it that you're paying the extra for that the realtors are doing? Nobody commented on the unstable land in one part of town where walls would sometimes pull apart (according to the realtor we were talking to,) You think maybe you could do a little snooping and find out it that was truth or a fairy tale?

What I loved about Ajijic (among other things) was that the street we had to walk down to get to our hotel was so dark that sometimes we had to feel our way along the wall, You know what? Never once did I I feel that my safety was threatened. Try that in Memphis some night!

Keep up the good reporting,

Kip
kip


juan david


Aug 23, 2003, 12:19 PM

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The real estate outfits take 15 or 20 percent of the monthly rent as a commission and for property management. They take care of utility bill payments and fix stuff that breaks. They may also pay the gardner and maid. Each arrangement with the property owner can be a bit different. As renters last year the agency was super responsive whenever fomething stopped working.
" let sleeping dogs lie"


shoe


Aug 23, 2003, 12:23 PM

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The stability of the area is something I don't know anything about. I do see cracks in the walls, street and sidewalk. I don't know why. Hills or something. Things aren't built earthquake proof and it might be the way things are built.

Ajijic Rentals handles everything for me and requires that I keep a $200 fund available. I pay my rent and replenish the fund each month. They pay for everything and if I need something fixed I just call them and they get it fixed and it is done with. They got me a maid that I wanted. Just about anything it seems. There were a lot of rentals available I thought. I visited about 9 realtors and they all had some. Prices varied as did the features, furnishings and prices. I chose this one for some reason.

I agree that it does seem super safe for some reason but we may be fooling ourselves. There must be some reason for the walls, bars and guards around. Everyone seems to have a fair amount of security. I don't see any cheap, easy to break in doors. I feel safer here that I did anywhere in Memphis even my hotel room. Been there a few times.

Nothing is intrinsically good or evil, but its manner of usage may make it so.
-St. Thomas Aquinas


Bubba

Aug 23, 2003, 1:07 PM

Post #20 of 57 (8035 views)

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Re: [shoe] ARRIVED

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Shoe:

The North Shore of Lake Chapala is very safe in general but be cautious about feeling too secure. Inattention to your surroundings can get you into trouble anywhere. Since I worked in Mobile, Oakland and San Francisco for many years, I would say that you are, indeed, safe in comparison to walking down dark steets in those places which could be deadly. I would be highly selective as to where I walked at night in Guadalajara, however.

We have been here since 2001 and have never had anything happen to us but home burglaries, muggings, assaults and other opportunistic crimes do occur with some regularity. Often these are initiated by guys cruising down from Guadalajara.

This is a pretty laid back place but never forget that there is much hardship, unemployment and a great disparity in income here. Wherever you go in the world, those conditions breed resentment and crime. That is ceratinly true of Memphis and other major southern cities that have crime rates not understood by most strangers who have no been forewarned.

Now, as to high walls and bars on the windows. Take a hint from the locals who can afford these things. Ostentatious displays of your good fortune are not appreciated here. In fact, that sort of behavior can be considered to be in poor taste and you should be discrete with your assets. Also, remember, a thief is looking for ease of execution of his intended crime and sees open housing plans as facilitating his success.

I am reminded of when I first got here and asked the contractor who was raising the level of our surrounding wall from four to eight feet if we should install a remote alarm system. He said, "Senor, in Mexico if we want to get into your property and take your assets, we will. Don't waste your money. Keep a low profile and remember, it is much harder to raise a big, heavy TV set over an eight foot wall than it is to raise a small, compact one."

And, never forget this, you would be safer in Pierre, S.D. but then you would be in Pierre, S.D.


johanson


Aug 23, 2003, 1:13 PM

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STABILITY:

I was hoping someone else would respond about these fault lines. Yep they’re there. Talk to Eager Real Estate, right across the office from them is a fault line or some line whereby there is some settling. The amount of settling seems slow but regular. I’m told that is good. Otherwise if it holds back, it could build up and there could be a major change. As you are heading East to Chapala there is a portion of the road that is always moving or settling a little bit. The locals just take all of this for granted and know better than to build on this fault or settlement line.



I have a house that was build 20 years ago in upper Ajijic. I have never had a problem with settling or whatever it’s called. Yet I’ve seen the effects of the settling on walls where these settlement or fault lines go.



Please someone with more knowledge than I pick this topic up and correct me or add to what I have already written.




Kip


Aug 23, 2003, 2:09 PM

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Re: [ian] ARRIVED

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Which agency was it? Do you use the same one every time?



Kip
kip


Kip


Aug 23, 2003, 2:24 PM

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Do you know what government (I think ) building was having so many problems with the fault? She (the realtor) also said that there had been some horror stories with some people who had bought houses nearby. The gist of the whole thing was to really do a thorough check on whatever you're looking at to buy. Even if you can fix what's wrong, just be sure it's not an ongoing thing.

Kip
kip


johanson


Aug 23, 2003, 2:49 PM

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Kip. Could the government building have been the old police station in Chapala next to the signal? I know they have been working on that for a while. But I am not sure why it had been shut down and or remodeled.



Pete


Bubba

Aug 23, 2003, 3:05 PM

Post #25 of 57 (8018 views)

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Re: [Kip] ARRIVED

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Kip & Pete:

The important thing for people to remember when coming down here to buy is that you have no true legal recourse if the contractor or architect are dishonest, incompetent or simply uninformed. If you are from some such place as California you will not comprehend this until it is too late. Am I wrong? Somebody speak up if you disagree.

How do you overcome this? Independent building inspectors? In a land where you will never successfully sue that contract inspector for fraud or incompetence? You had better use a highly reputable real estate firm which has been around forever and has something to lose by misguiding you. That firm will recommend a building inspector to you. Then, you had better follow that building inspector around and grill that person in-depth during the inspection procedure.

As a potential buyer, you need to know that neighborhood nuisances such as nearby nightclubs, noisy factories, pig farms, pet kennels or the non-existence of residential zoning (or a thousand other problems) need not be disclosed to you and will almost certainly not be disclosed to you. Just because they may not be there when you buy or are closed that day does not mean they won't crank up the lathes the next day or show up next week and you will have no recourse to the seller even if the seller was constructively aware of the problem. You must do your own due diligence. Check out the neighborhood with a fine tooth comb. If you depend on outside consultants you do not know or fly-by-night real estate agents, be prepared to suffer in solitude without recourse to the law.

That recourse to the law thing is another subject altogether. Don't even go there.

If you do your homework, there is no finer place on the planet.


(This post was edited by Bubba on Aug 23, 2003, 3:09 PM)


Kip


Aug 23, 2003, 3:13 PM

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That goes right back to the rent before you buy old song. Six months of renting should give you time to meet and get to know some of your potentail new neighbors and maybe find out a little extra about that perfect house you've got your eye on.

Kip
kip


Kip


Aug 23, 2003, 3:15 PM

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Re: [johanson] ARRIVED

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It could be , but we were looking at property in Ajijic when she was talking about it.
kip


johanson


Aug 23, 2003, 3:21 PM

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Re: [Bubba] ARRIVED

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Bubba: Amen to your last post.

You have to be careful, very careful. Due diligence. Due diligence. I can't say it enough.

Now if I may quote that famous Oregonian; "If you do your homework, there is no finer place on the planet. "


HHERRINGTON


Aug 23, 2003, 6:34 PM

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Kudo's Bubba, great responses and excellent advice.
----------------------------------------------------

Life is too complicated to be expressed in one liners.


Uncle Donnie

Aug 25, 2003, 8:07 AM

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Re: [Bubba] ARRIVED

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Hi Kip,

I think Pete is correct about the old Police Station in Chapala. And the area between it and the edge of Chapala headed back toward Ajijic is notorious for shifting.

One of the local realtors (you'll quickly discover who she is after you begin looking down here) sold a house in the area to an older couple from the U.S. and it immediately began deteriorating due to shifting earth. Floors buckled, outside stairs collarsed. roof leaked, walls cracked, etc.

My advice? Talk to LOTS of folks before you choose either a realtor or an area in which to buy or rent.

Just like back where you're moving from.

And Shoe, congrats! And Bubba's advice regarding due diligence on your part is dead-on!

UD

Shameless self-promotion:
http://www.headformexico.com


Kip


Aug 25, 2003, 10:32 AM

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Uncle Donnie! You're back!! All right!!

That sounds like the same house that she was telling us about. Lets hope there aren't that many that fit that description.

You're absolutely right about Mississippi. It's only been a few years since they've started doing building permits and inspections. That doesn't completely solve the problem unfortunately. The local inspector here is a heck of a nice guy but he's from a large family and a lot of them are builders. He would just hate for the family to be upset with him because he didn't approve one of his many nephews' projects.

It takes a really looooong time for things to change in the south , if ever.

Glad you're back,

Kip
kip


Bubba

Aug 25, 2003, 2:32 PM

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Re: [Kip] ARRIVED

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Kip:

Now, lissen here. I know your heart is in the right place, but to single out Mississippi as corrupted by "family values" misdirects the issue and, therefore, confuses people who have traditionally elevated their own self-esteem by looking down on others they presume to be inferior because of their geographical origin. One of the major decisions we do not make in our lives is where we are born. You and I try mightily to be humorous on the forums but we also know that southerners or even Oregonamisssissippians tend toward self-flagellation brought about by years of living with two things I list in order of importance:

(1) Fear of community rejection.

(2) Fear of spending eternity in hell which, I presume, does not mean constant contact with Cousin Betty Sue and Uncle Jim Bob in an eternal and repetitious unctuous ode to the founder of themselves.

Now, those of you planning to move down here to Mexico remember this:

Family values corrupt everywhere whether in Istanbul or Fargo. If you are a stranger in town passing through at the wrong time, God have mercy on your soul.

Mexico is not so different, just a bit more obvious than the corrupted city of San Francisco where I made my home for many years.

I suggest a re-viewing of Midnight Express with close attention to the fat crooked lawyer and the court system.

A Mexican friend of mine, who is a great and morally cognizant person, at one time told me that gringos helped to perpetuate the corruption in Mexico by paying mordida to traffic cops. Then last week she told me where I could buy a pirated CD of one of her favorite artists for only $50 Pesos. She failed to see the irony.

What you new people need to know is that Mexico, as every other place, Paris to Nairobi has nuances within its infrastructure you will not comprehend for a long time after arriving here and, therefore, you are subject to the same flim-flam as the country boy from Nebraska just arriving in The Big Apple. Be alert and cautious in all strange places! Once you understand your surroundings and the people you are dealing with you will be allright and can really enjoy the pleasure of having learned to live successfully in a place that is (or was) strange to you while all of your friends were afaid to leave Oshkosh and are sitting back there right now in Fred's Tavern and Package Store eating fried zucchini strips with Pabst Blue Ribbon .


(This post was edited by Bubba on Aug 25, 2003, 2:38 PM)


Kip


Aug 25, 2003, 5:28 PM

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I think the main difference between Mississippi and Mexico is that in Mexico you're expecting things to be different so you're more likely to watch for the differences. You can look around and see that you're not in Kansas anymore. Whereas in Mississippi you look around and except for the small number of complete sets of teeth, the bib overalls the shotguns in the back windows, the ever present wad of chewing tobacco in the cheek,...Hmmmmm,..Never mind.

Kip
kip


Jean

Aug 26, 2003, 6:12 AM

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I think what has been referred to in previous posts about homes falling apart is the Chula Vista Norte development and all the problems they had with their new homes. There is a website somewhere where the people who owned homes set up pictures showing all the things that were happening to their "new" homes. At one point last year they even had a protest march right out near the highway. I do not know if the issues were ever resolved to anyone's satisfaction.
Retirement Communities
http://www.retirecommunities.com


Kip


Aug 26, 2003, 6:38 AM

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How do I word it to search the posts? I tried "houses falling down "and walls falling down", but that didn't do it.

Kip
kip


Jean

Aug 26, 2003, 7:04 AM

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http://www.mexconnected.com/...ta%20norte%22;#25224

Half way down in this thread they discuss some of what happened in Chula Vista Norte. The website that had been put up on the net is now gone.
Retirement Communities
http://www.retirecommunities.com


Kip


Aug 26, 2003, 7:26 AM

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Re: [Tuatha_de_Danann] ARRIVED

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I didn't find any mention of walls falling, mainly an agument about who had the right information.

Kip
kip


juan david


Aug 26, 2003, 3:26 PM

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We had Ajijic Rentals.....same as Shoe. Margarita runs the "back office" which has everything to do with the excellent service we recieved as renters. This year we are returning as owners, but would still love to get our mitts on their fixit guys. Being a plumbing/electrical/mechanical/carpentry etc klutz, I need a go to guy for all kinds of things. Anybody know of a good general handyman in Ajijic?
" let sleeping dogs lie"


Kip


Aug 26, 2003, 5:56 PM

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I'm bringing one with me!

Kip
kip


esperanza

Aug 27, 2003, 7:33 AM

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OK, since nobody else has directly addressed this question, I will.

The entire north shore of the lake is riddled with faultlines. Don't let anyone tell you otherwise. Examples:

Even before last January's earthquake, the indoor market on the plaza in Chapala was slated to be torn down due to faultline damage. After protest by vendors and the public, it was renovated instead.

A friend of mine owns a large house from the Porfiriato (around the turn of the century), located on the street directly behind the Chapala market. His house is cracked and crumbling beyond repair due to slippage along the fault.

The hill area on Hidalgo in Chapala, as you head out of town (directly across from several banks and the Coffee Tree) is geologically unstable in the extreme. Last year a boulder the size of a small house rolled down the hill and crushed a house in its path, killing the young woman who lived there. She was 8 months pregnant.

The faultlines continue through Riberas, San Antonio, La Floresta, and Ajijic. Most people are plagued with minor cracking of walls and floors due to the constant shifting of the soil and the water table. Some areas are more affected than others. Age of the house doesn't appear to have anything to do with stability. A friend in San Antonio can no longer live in his house due to heaving of the floors. There is substantial cracking in business structures as well as in private homes.

In my own house, I have had a variety of problems. Two years ago the kitchen floor heaved up approximately 18 inches and then fell apart. Fortunately it was possible to have it repaired. During that same time period, serious structural cracking appeared in one wall; it was also possible to have this problem repaired.

After the earthquake last January (the epicenter was in Colima), new cracks began developing in my 70-year-old house and casita. At the moment, I am in the process of contracting to have the façade of the casita removed and replaced (torsion has caused the iron window frames to twist just enough to break the glass, and the cement portion of the wall has developed large cracks). Torsion also has caused glass breakage in a bedroom window and serious cracking in the affected wall.

Neighbors across the street have experienced severe structural cracking in several walls of their home.

Similar problems exist in other areas of town, including newly built and theoretically luxury homes west of the village.

The problems are not so much construction problems as faultline and other earth-movement problems. I am in no way complaining or otherwise stressed by the situation; this is NORMAL for the Lake Chapala area.

There is no law that requires disclosure of this type situation. Be careful where you rent or buy, and be cautious about your contractors if you build. Know your realtor and don't be bamboozled.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Kip


Aug 27, 2003, 10:04 AM

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Thank you Esperanza,

These aren't deal killers just things to take into consideration. The more we all know ahead of time the less pole-axed we're going to be if and when something does happen. The other thing is to put the blame on the real creator of the problem, in this case Mother Nature, not the guys who did the work.

That old song you all keep singing, "rent first, rent first, rent first", doth apply again.

Hmmm.... don't know if this would apply or have any worth at all , but in the NW they make some log houses out of "really big" logs. I'm not a builder so I may not explain this right, but they had some kind of semi attached board to allow for the movement of the wall as the logs shrank. I know that I'm not explaining this right, anybody out there know what I'm referring to that can explain it better?

I don't know if there is any way to do construction that would be "more forgiving" of natures "little' bumps and grinds, but it is something to think about.

Kip
kip


shoe


Aug 27, 2003, 5:27 PM

Post #42 of 57 (6792 views)

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Love these threads. My ARRIVED came to this topic now. I love it.

I don't know much about fault lines here or the building industry here. BUT, when KIP mentions a more forgiving type of building I just have to put in my two cents. Certainly all it is worth.

In the late 20's a guy named Buckminster Fuller (check Google) invented a structure called the Geodesic Dome. This sucker is about the strongest thing we can build out of wood, and most cost effective structure known to man. I know as I built one in Kentucky after a lot of study. I bought a partial kit (shell), from a company call Timberline, and had the shell up with my wife helping me in three days. This was to the point of ready for shingles (our choice of roofing). Tar paper was on. Windows in and doors were in. Sucker was buttoned up. We did have a young man help us some. Partial kit costs were about $9K in '89. I built it on a deck which I found out moved a little (KY has fault lines too) but it didn't bother the dome at all. Kept having to fix the deck. Think of a bee hive and if you remember your high school teacher telling you that you can stand on one, it is the same principle. Where ever you or something pushes on a dome the rest of the dome pushes back. We were hit by the winds of a tornado and it did nothing to the dome. It took doors off the barn and things like that but nothing to the house.

Now, while it didn't take very long to put the shell up, it took me better than 5+ years to finish up the inside. I made all the cabinets and did all plumbing, electrical and everything. Wife did get upset when I made the bar before I made anything for the kitchen. There were no square corners and it wasn't any fun. Doing it by myself was a pain also as my wife went to work. I was too retired to work to hard and had a quarter horse farm to take care of also. Some retirement!

I see no domes here and think one would really look out of place but it might tackle the settling problem a little bit.

The log shrinkage problem is a header system that is on the top of the logs between the logs and the roof. As the logs shrink this allows the roof to settle without any leakage. I forget what it is called also, but it does the trick. Now I don't know what this would do if the thing warps or sags. I guess if you warp a log long enough it might split.

A dome can warp and sag and all you would have to do is adjust the doors and windows, if that. Maybe shore it up a little if necessary. No big deal. Mine did a little but I never had to adjust anything. Mother nature has a hard time taking down domes, hurricane Hugo didn't do it, Nomo didn't do it, the typhon in the Philippines didn't do it the same year. None went down.

Just my thoughts, KIP, et al.

shoe


Kip


Aug 27, 2003, 6:25 PM

Post #43 of 57 (6782 views)

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You are so right! I'd forgotten about domes,..I love them! There are so many cool things you can do with them. I know the first ones to come out had some problems with leaking but if I remember right they solved that problem. Hmmmm, what if you covered the dome in some kind of stucco with a polymer? anyway something that gives added in? A stucco dome covered in Bouganvillia? I love it!They had some really great ones in California. One was HUGE with smaller domes connected and all covered in bright metallic red tiles. Oh yeah, they were very efficient because they had such great air flow (no corners) I wonder if there would be a way to do them in tile without them cracking? We've got the big Oregon Dome catalog around here someplace. I bet they have a website. Food for thought. Thanks Shoe,

Kip
kip


shoe


Aug 28, 2003, 6:51 AM

Post #44 of 57 (6761 views)

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Kip, there are elastomeric coatings that you can put on domes that you can get in colors and looks like stucco and is quite forgiving. They have the properties of rubber. Made from polymers these days. Moves quite well. Doesn't leak and isn't too difficult to put on. Tile would be a different story as trying to fit in over the ridges might be difficult. There are a lot of ridges and points to a dome. A shake roof is also quite nice. There are a lot of dome sites on the net. Connecting a little one to a bigger one works out fine and gives lots of space. Heating and cooling works out well as air flow is great. Minimum restrictions. My plan was to add another dome to the 35' one that I had done but the marriage went south first as the job became more important to her than the horses, farm, and me. We are still friends and I helped her buy a house in town and store some of my stuff in her basement. I am furnishing a couple of rooms in her house with antique bedroom furniture and other antiques.

Anyway check Google for a lot of web sites for your reading pleasure.

You certainly could grow a lot of things over the domes to make it look very nice. Many flowers would climb the thing and make it very attractive.

Just some more thoughts. Not too many people like domes though as there is a lot of wasted space in them a lot of people think. I liked the feeling of the openness. My front room ceiling was 22' with a pentagon skylight up there that opened. I loved it. It also had two other skylights looking up. Loved it. Inside walls of the dome were done in 3/8" knotty pine, tongue and groove which didn't split if the dome moved while I was there in the 14 years, so it wasn't too bad. It did move some too. So it wasn't too bad. I had a loft too and that was closer to the pentagon and loved it.

shoe

Nothing is intrinsically good or evil, but its manner of usage may make it so.
-St. Thomas Aquinas


Kip


Aug 28, 2003, 7:19 AM

Post #45 of 57 (6756 views)

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Ask the right questions.... Your dome sounds great. We were always going to build one but it just never happened. I loved not having to have any load bearing interior walls. The ones we were looking at had one wall that they designed all of the plumbing and electrical around. Went from first floor on up. Kind of a hidden hallway that had easy access for any kind of repair work. Very cool design. With a dome your imagination is about the only limitation for your interior design.

Kip
kip


shoe


Aug 28, 2003, 8:33 AM

Post #46 of 57 (6744 views)

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The one wall idea sounds great but it also depends on how private you want your bathrooms to be and a few things like that, especially for guests. Ha! ha!

Electrical codes for outlets on the walls can make for some interesting problems. Forget codes, its usage that I care about. I don't like extension cords. I want a lot of outlets. Had them every 4 to 6 feet. I had the whole house on a ground fault box. Didn't need individual GFI outlets. Blew the inspectors mind that I went to that trouble. KY people didn't do that. Plumbing was inside as it freezes hard up there. Ran it behind the cabinets in the kitchen, and to the bathrooms. I only had three walls.

shoe

Nothing is intrinsically good or evil, but its manner of usage may make it so.
-St. Thomas Aquinas


esperanza

Aug 28, 2003, 8:51 AM

Post #47 of 57 (6737 views)

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There is at least one dome in the Lake Chapala area. Shoe, your homework for this week is to find it. Hint: it's in plain sight on a main road.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com









Kip


Aug 28, 2003, 8:55 AM

Post #48 of 57 (6736 views)

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Ah ha! The man has a quest! Be very interesting to hear what the owners have to say.

Kip
kip


Uncle Donnie

Aug 28, 2003, 9:20 AM

Post #49 of 57 (6731 views)

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Esperanza, do you think anyone lives in that dome? I've never seen anyone around. Many times I've been tempted to drive up there to check it out.

Shameless self-promotion:
http://www.headformexico.com


sfmacaws


Aug 28, 2003, 4:38 PM

Post #50 of 57 (6709 views)

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Some of these are domes but I dont know if the concrete works well on a fault or not. They are incredible though and worth going to look at if nothing else.

http://www.geocities.com/...ngconcrete/index.htm



Jonna


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




esperanza

Aug 28, 2003, 5:35 PM

Post #51 of 57 (1206 views)

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UD, I don't know...I agree that it looks a little lonesome over there. Maybe we should meet up and go have a peek.

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Uncle Donnie

Aug 29, 2003, 8:53 AM

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Davey Baby wants us to meet up anyway for a secret project to be unveiled in November. Would you contact me at dondelmundo@yahoo.com? Both of these adventures might be exciting (and informative).

Shameless self-promotion:
http://www.headformexico.com


mkdutch

Aug 29, 2003, 10:15 AM

Post #53 of 57 (1187 views)

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Perhaps taking a cue from Frank Lloyd Wright's Imperial Hotel in Tokyo might work. The hotel withstood a major quake shortly after it was built, when all of the structures around it came tumbling down. It eventually came down, tho. The ground under it became so valuable, that it was torn down...a real travesty, IMO.

The Hotel rested on a simple slab that had small piers going down into the ground at regular intervals; no conventional foundation. This allowed the soil under the building to move without taking the walls with it. I would think that laying a network of rebars that are welded together before pouring the slab would give you a fairly crack-resistant base to build upon. Anyone tried anything like this?


sandykayak


Aug 29, 2003, 11:59 AM

Post #54 of 57 (1176 views)

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wow, jonna, they certainly are creative. check out steve and emilia's house near SMA.

i love barrel vaulted roofs...especially the Ajijic ones I saw that show the natural brick...and those domed skylights are also awesome.....
Sandy Kramer
Miami, Fla & El Parque


sfmacaws


Aug 29, 2003, 12:06 PM

Post #55 of 57 (1174 views)

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I drove around looking for those houses last New Year's when we were in SMdA. Alas, I didn't find them. I'm sure if I ask around I'll be able to at least drive by and see them in person. They must be rather well known and they appear to be outside of town where it is open and fairly flat so you can see a ways.

Those are some of my "if I won the lottery" houses - I'd love to have them make a house for me somewhere around Xcalak. Oh well, I always forget to buy lotto tickets so it's probably not in my future. They are fun to dream about though.

Jonna


Jonna - Mérida, Yucatán




sandykayak


Aug 29, 2003, 12:19 PM

Post #56 of 57 (1169 views)

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usn's in south florida always reckoned that we'd rather have hurricanes cos at least we get several days' notice and can haul a** if necessary.

i "survived" an earthquake in caracas about 30 years ago - buildings came down in the city, but we were in the 'burbs and just ran outside when everything started shaking.

i do, however, clearly remember the feeling of panic as i looked down and wondered if the earth was going to open up and swallow us!!
Sandy Kramer
Miami, Fla & El Parque


esperanza

Aug 29, 2003, 1:33 PM

Post #57 of 57 (1157 views)

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OK gang, this has been a fun thread, but it's drifted way away from its original topic. I'm going to lock it up now, so let's start another one or two.

http://www.mexicocooks.typepad.com







 
 
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