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YucaLandia


Oct 19, 2015, 9:13 PM

Views: 22603

Re: [viktoremski] Recent experiences in INM and Consulate office

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"renouncing any foreign citizenships" - what do they exactly mean? Giving up US (or any other) citizenship, or just renouncing it while in Mexican territory?


This issue has been around since at least the mid-1980's.

Mexico requires that its foreigner-applicants for naturalized citizenship both make oral pledges to renounce citizenship with any/all other countries.

They also make the foreigner-applicant for naturalized citizenship to sign forms saying that the applicant renounces citizenship with any/all other countries.

Once a foreigner is given naturalized citizenship - they are liable for all Mexican government laws and regulations, and the SRE people also explain that the IF the new naturalized Mexican citizen gets into legal trouble in Mexico ... that individual (now a Mexican Citizen) ... gets NO help from any countries that they had prior citizenship in.

..
.
Before 1986, this was a huge problem for Americans. In 1986, the US Congress passed a rule (law?) saying that US citizens remain as US citizens, until / unless 2 things happen first:
1. the US citizen files a formal written letter at a US Consulate saying that they renounce their US citizenship.
and
2. the US citizen is STILL a US citizen (even after filing the formal written renunciation), until the IRS decides that the citizen has paid all future taxes that are owed ... So, the IRS must get their final bite of your apple before allowing us to legally stop being US citizens.

The US State Department was grumpy about this until about 1993, but then relented, and since then, formal US policy has been that Americans can go through ceremonies in Mexico where the US citizens sign renunciation forms for the Mex. Gob. and that the US citizens can make oral renunciations of their US citizenship in front of Mexican officials ...

And under both Mexican and US law ... when a person carries both passports ... That individual is bound-by all US laws as a US citizen while in the USA ... with none of the privileges of carrying a foreign passport ... and The same goes for Mexico that the individual is bound by all Mexican laws - with none of the privileges of being a US citizen - while in Mexico.

Make sense?
steve
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Read-on MacDuff
E-visit at http://yucalandia.com

(This post was edited by YucaLandia on Oct 19, 2015, 9:15 PM)


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Post edited by YucaLandia (Veteran) on Oct 19, 2015, 9:14 PM
Post edited by YucaLandia (Veteran) on Oct 19, 2015, 9:15 PM


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