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Navigating through the cyberspace signposts of Mexican history

Ron Mader

Take a look at enough street signs in Mexico and soon you will be pondering the origin of their names. The country's urban geography provides a veritable "Who's Who" of Mexico's heroes and important anniversaries. So if you are wondering who "Venustiano Carranza" was and what occurred on the “20 de Noviembre,” you might want to go online. The Web offers a good crash course in Mexican history from its native roots to up-to-the-minute headlines. Make sure your printer is working. You'll probably want to refer to these resources on cross-town treks or you may want to share some of these documents with friends.

Mexican Heritage Almanac

http://www.ironhorse.com/~nagual/alma.html
***** (out of 5 *)

This popular electronic almanac is the perfect English-language primer about Mexican history. It is bound to delight both novice and academic alike. Chihuahua native and engineer Victor Grado, one of the founders of the soc.culture.mexican usenet group, created this award-winning website that provides a treasure trove of historical "Did you know?" facts and dates.

The almanac's home page changes daily. First up is the day's astronomical alignments—important throughout Mesoamerican cultures. Morning and Evening stars are displayed each day as well as glyph representations of the date in the Maya Long Count, and the Zapotec, Purepecha and Mexica languages. The almanac also lists important events that happened that day in history. This is already a 5-star site! So how could this site be more useful? Grado throws in the "Corrido of the Day" ( http://www.ironhorse.com/~nagual/corridos/D/pick.html), which will charm aficionados of Mexican music. Excellent!
Email contact: nagual@ironhorse.com

Album Conmemorativo de la Guerra entre Mexico y Estados Unidos
(Commemorative Album of the War between Mexico and the United States)

http://sunsite.unam.mx/revistas/1847/Distrib.html
*****

This work of art digs into the events of the 1846-1847 war between Mexico and the United States. This Spanish-language site sponsored by the National Autonomous University (UNAM) makes for fascinating reading, and if you're learning Spanish, the text here is accompanied with images and makes for an engaging learning experience. There is also an excellent links page— http://sunsite.unam.mx/revistas/1847/Hebra.html—with a host of other documents about U.S.-Mexico relations.
Email contact: aepm@servidor.unam.mx

Mexico Connect´s History Index

http://www.mexconnected.com/mex_/history/historyindex.html
****

The site, developed by Mexico Connect with principal writers Jim Tuck and Dale Hoyt Palfrey, includes an index of Famous People in the History of Mexico— http://www.mexconnected.com/mex_/history/mexicopeople.html— which is a veritable "Who's Who" of Mexican historical figures from Quetzalcoatl to Carlos Salinas de Gortari and the Zapatistas. Each entry is hyperlinked. Clicking on Venustiano Carranza ( http://www.mexconnected.com/mex_/history/vcarranzo1.html) accesses a photo and brief biography of the famous Mexican president. This page is an excellent resource for students. Providing context to the biographies is the hyperlinked History Time Line ( http://www.mexconnected.com/mex_/history.html) that contrasts Mexican history with events around the world for the past 3,000 years.

Important Dates in the History of Mexico

http://mexico.udg.mx/Ingles/Historia/datos.html
***

The University of Guadalajara hosts this reference page, part of an even larger history directory— http://mexico.udg.mx/Ingles/Historia/history.html. The Important Dates page provides details on the origins of the Mexica people to 1986. This site has a great deal of information and will be of use to any Mexicophile. Specific sections address the Pre-Hispanic, Colonial and Revolutionary periods. Coverage of the Contemporary Period is lacking but could easily be updated.

Other useful pages

include the University of Texas's LANIC Latin American History ( http://lanic.utexas.edu/la/region/history/),
Mexico City's Museum of Natural History ( http://www.arts-history.mx/hnatural.html),
Donald Mabry's Historical Text Archive ( http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Forum/9061/mexico/mexico.html),
Santa Fe History: The Mexican Period ( http://www.santafe.org/mexican.html)
and the Spanish-language Evolucion del Estado Mexicano ( http://www.cegs.itesm.mx/hdem/esquema.htm), an excellent overview of political change in Mexico.

Published or Updated on: January 1, 2006 by Ron Mader © 2008
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