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Baked Jalapenos Stuffed with Smoked Fish and Cheese: Jalapenos Rellenos con Pescado Ahumado y Queso al Horno by Karen Hursh Graber © 2006

This could be called a Mexican version of the jalapeño "poppers" popular north of the border. The idea for the filling came from Susana Trilling, who has written about the smoked mullet of southern Oaxaca, and the idea for the chile soaking technique came from the experience of biting into a jalapeño so hot that it obliterated the taste of the other ingredients. The soaking neutralizes some of the "heat," making this a delicious appetizer or snack that can be made with just about any kind of smoked fish. Mullet, tuna, trout and mackerel are some of the most common smoked fish in Mexico.

Ingredients:

  • 12 fresh jalapeños, slit lengthwise, stems and seeds removed
  • 4 ounces soft cream cheese
  • 4 ounces shredded smoked fish
  • 2 tablespoons finely minced onion
  • 1 clove garlic, peeled and minced
  • 1 tablespoon chopped parsley
  • salt, pepper and Worcestershire sauce ( salsa inglesa) to taste
  • 2 eggs, beaten
  • 2 tablespoons milk, plus extra for soaking chiles
  • 1/2 cup flour, seasoned with salt and pepper
  • 1/2 cup dry bread crumbs, seasoned with salt and pepper

Preparation:

Place the slit jalapeños in a bowl, cover with milk, and refrigerate overnight. Drain jalapenos and pat dry.

Mix the cream cheese, smoked fish, onion, garlic, parsley, salt, pepper. Stuff the chiles with the mixture, dividing it evenly among them.

Mix the egg and 2 tablespoons milk in a bowl. Place the flour in another bowl, and the breadcrumbs in another. Dredge the jalapeños in flour, tapping gently to shake off excess, then dip in the egg mixture, then in the breadcrumbs, coating evenly. Letting the breaded jalapenos sit on a rack for 10-15 minutes will "set" the coating so that it will adhere better while baking.

Bake the jalapenos for 25-30 minutes on a greased cookie sheet. The coating should be golden brown and the filling bubbling.

Serve as appetizers or snacks. Makes 12.


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Published or Updated on: April 1, 2006 by Karen Hursh Graber © 2008
Contact Karen Hursh Graber

Follow Karen as she travels through the Central Mexican state of Puebla, meeting local cooks, tasting the food, and collecting recipes. With over 75 recipes, plus sections on ingredients and cooking techniques, the book takes the reader on a journey through one of Mexico's oldest and most renowned culinary regions. It can be ordered online.

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